Translingual edit

Alternative forms edit

Symbol edit

im

  1. (informal) A Roman numeral representing nine hundred ninety-nine (999).

See also edit

English edit

Adjective edit

im (not comparable)

  1. (medicine) Initialism of intramuscular.
    Alternative forms: IM, I.M., i.m.
    • 1999, Carrie J. Bagatell, William J. Bremmer, “Androgen and Estrogen Effects on Plasma Lipids in Men”, in Leonard Share, editor, Hormones and the Heart in Health and Disease (Contemporary Endocrinology; 21), Totowa, NJ: Humana Press, →ISBN, page 237:
      In the past few years, T patches have also been released for prescription usage. Both scrotally applied and nonscrotally applied vehicles are available. These forms of delivery offer more constant T levels and avoid the inconvenience of im injection.

Afar edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ím m 

  1. thing

Synonyms edit

References edit

  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[5], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Albanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology 1 edit

Demonstrative pronoun Proto-Albanian *is + (unstressed) 1st sg. pronoun Proto-Albanian *me, from Proto-Indo-European *is and Proto-Indo-European *me.[1][2]

Pronoun edit

im m (accusative/dative/ablative tim, genitive (i) tim, nominative, accusative plural e mi, genitive plural (i) të mi, dative/ablative plural të mi)[3][4][5]

  1. my, of mine (possessive pronoun in nominative form, adjectival aspect)[6][7]
    1.1. possessive pronoun placed → after noun, gender of the pronoun agrees with the gender of possessum/noun:
    (Gheg) syn i ẽm (jẽm)(one/an) eye of mine (one of my eye)
    1.1.b. definite/singular noun + im m (Gheg: with jẽm m; a compound of prepositive article i + pronoun ẽm m):
    libri imthe book of mine (my book)
    syri immy eye
    (Gheg) syni i ẽm (syni jẽm)my eye
    ati im, vëllai im, biri immy father, my brother, my son
    1.2.a. indefinite/plural noun + (linking morpheme) + (pronoun) mi m:
    dy sy të mi(two) both of my eyes
    1.2.b. definite/plural noun + (link. morph.) e + mi m:
    librat e mimy books (the books of mine)
    sytë e mimy (the eyes of mine)
  2. my (possessive pronoun, adjectival aspect)
    2.1. pronoun placed → before noun, pronoun gender agrees with possessum gender, → restricted to kinship terms, family members:
    2.1.a. indefinite/singular noun + im m:
    im gjysh, im atë, im birmy grandfather, my father, my son
    Im atë, i dashuri ati im.My father, my beloved father.
  3. mine (possessive pronoun, nominal aspect)
    3.1. pronoun stands alone, nominal declension of pronoun, pronoun gender agrees with possessum gender (fem. possessor → masc. possessum → masc. pronoun), im m (my) → imi m (mine):
    Singular: imimine
    (Gheg) i ẽmi (jẽmi)(of/the) mine
    Plural: të mitëmine
    Ti je imi m.You are mine.
    (Gheg) Ti je i m ẽmi m (jẽmi).You are (of/the) mine.
    Është imi.It is mine.
    (Gheg) Õsht i ẽmi (jẽmi).It is (of/the) mine.
Declension edit
  • 1. Possessive pronouns (adjectival)
  • 2. Possessive pronouns (adjectival)

There are also alternative forms which can be used before the noun (which will be in the indefinite state). These forms are restricted to personal relationships like family members, for example:

  • im vëlla (my brother), ime motër (my sister)

These forms are limited to singulars.

  • 3. Possessive pronouns (nominal)

Noun edit

im m (definite imi, definite plural të mitë)[8]

  1. a kinsman; a member of the same clan, tribe or family (kinship, singular)
    Synonyms: afërm, fis, fisnik, kushëri
    Një imi.A kinsman (One of mine).
  2. one's (own); kinsfolk; family members (kinship, plural)
    Synonyms: familje, familjarët, farefis, gjini
    A: Kush erdhi? - B: Erdhën të mitë.A: Who came? - B: My family came.
  3. a close friend or partner; a beloved and trusted person (sg.+pl., person (or people) connected through relationship (or friendship))
    Synonyms: besnik, dashur, mik, shok
Related terms edit
  • ime f (my, of mine)
  • ma (me), (id)
  • mu (to me), mua (id)

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

From imë, a variant of imtë (tiny, small).[9]

Verb edit

im (aorist ima, participle imur)

  1. (active voice, transitive) to crumble, grind, shred, refine
    Synonyms: imtoj, imtësoj, bluaj, thërrmoj, zbërthej
Declension edit
  • (note: only 3rd person sg/pl passive forms; passive imet (it is grinding))
Related terms edit
References edit
  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (2000) A concise historical grammar of the Albanian language: reconstruction of Proto-Albanian[1], Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 241 → personal pronouns §3.2.4.1., from IE *me
  2. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998), “pronoun im (my)”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden; Boston; Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 154
  3. ^ Oda Buchholz, Wilfried Fiedler, Gerda Uhlisch (2000) Langenscheidt Handwörterbuch Albanisch, Langenscheidt Verlag, →ISBN, page 196 → (m.) possessive pronoun im (my) / (f.) poss. pronoun ime (my)
  4. ^ Oda Buchholz, Wilfried Fiedler, Gerda Uhlisch (2000) Langenscheidt Handwörterbuch Albanisch, Langenscheidt Verlag, →ISBN, page 323 → (m.pl) possessive pronoun (e/të) mi (my, (of) mine); (f.pl) poss. pronoun (e/të mia (my, (of) mine)
  5. ^ Oda Buchholz, Wilfried Fiedler, Gerda Uhlisch (2000) Langenscheidt Handwörterbuch Albanisch, Langenscheidt Verlag, →ISBN, page 570 → (m./sg.) dat./abl. possessive pronoun tim (my, of mine); genitive poss. pronoun (i) tim (my, of mine)
  6. ^ Martin Camaj (1984) Albanian grammar: with exercises, chrestomathy and glossaries, Otto Harrassowitz Verlag, Wiesbaden, →ISBN, [[2] → (m.) possessive pronouns im, imi (my (of mine), mine); ime, imja (my (of mine), mine) (see → §134. - §136.: possessive pronouns and declension) page 102-103]
  7. ^ Olga Mišeska Tomić (2006) Balkan Sprachbund, Morpho-syntactic Features, Springer Science & Business Media, The Netherlands, →ISBN, [[3] page 199-201]
  8. ^ [4] 7.) m./sg. noun im/imi; f.sg. noun ime/imja(kinsman, kinswoman) / m./pl. noun (të) mitë; f./pl. noun (të) mijat (kinfolks (m., f.)) • in FJALË, Fjalor Shqip (WORDS, Albanian Dictionary)
  9. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998), “im”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden; Boston; Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 154
Further reading edit
  • [6] (m.sg.) poss. pronoun im (my) • Fjalori Shqip (Albanian Dictionary)
  • [7] (m.pl.) poss. pronoun (e) mi (my) • Fjalori Shqip (Albanian Dictionary)
  • [8] (f.sg.) poss. pronoun ime (my) • Fjalori Shqip (Albanian Dictionary)
  • [9] (f.pl.) poss. pronoun (e) mia (my) • Fjalori Shqip (Albanian Dictionary)

Degenan edit

Noun edit

im

  1. water

Further reading edit

Dupaningan Agta edit

Conjunction edit

im

  1. but
  2. than (comparative marker)

German edit

Etymology edit

Contraction.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɪm/
  • (file)

Contraction edit

im

  1. Contraction of in dem; in the

Usage notes edit

  • The contraction im is obligatory when the definite article has no deixis whatsoever. In this case it is ungrammatical to use in dem as separate words:
Wir sitzen im Garten.We're sitting in the garden.
Er arbeitet im technischen Bereich.He works in the technical field.
  • On the other hand, im is usually not applicable when the definite article has an indicative function. This includes contexts in which English would use a demonstrative pronoun (“this” or “that”) but also some others. Particularly, in dem is used before a defining relative clause.
In dem Haus haben wir mal gewohnt.We used to live in that house [over there].
Mein Großvater starb in dem Haus, wo ich geboren wurde.My grandfather died in the house where I was born.

Declension edit

The preposition in can be used with both accusative and dative objects, but it only contracts with dem as im and with das as ins. Thus, the combination of in with the definite article has the following forms:

masculine neuter feminine plural
accusative in den ins in die in die
dative im im in der in den

Gothic edit

Romanization edit

im

  1. Romanization of 𐌹𐌼

Irish edit

Etymology 1 edit

 
im

From Old Irish imb,[1] from Proto-Celtic *amben (compare Welsh ymenyn), from Proto-Indo-European *h₃engʷen- (compare Latin unguen (grease), Old High German ancho (butter)).[2]

 
Irish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ga

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

im m (genitive singular ime, nominative plural imeanna)

  1. butter
Declension edit
Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

Etymology 2 edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Contraction edit

im (triggers lenition)

  1. (Munster) Contraction of i mo (in my).
    Chuireas an peann im phóca.
    I put the pen in my pocket.
Related terms edit

Etymology 3 edit

Preposition edit

im (plus dative, triggers lenition, does not mutate b, m, or p)

  1. Alternative form of um

Mutation edit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
im n-im him t-im
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References edit

  1. ^ G. Toner, M. Ní Mhaonaigh, S. Arbuthnot, D. Wodtko, M.-L. Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “imb, imm”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  2. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*amben-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 69
  3. ^ Sjoestedt, M. L. (1931) Phonétique d’un parler irlandais de Kerry (in French), Paris: Librairie Ernest Leroux, § 134, page 70
  4. ^ Quiggin, E. C. (1906) A Dialect of Donegal, Cambridge University Press, § 101, page 40

Iu Mien edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Hmong-Mien *ʔim (bitter). Cognate with White Hmong iab and Western Xiangxi Miao [Fenghuang] anb.

Adjective edit

im 

  1. bitter

Jamaican Creole edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Derived from English him.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈim/
  • Hyphenation: im

Pronoun edit

im

  1. he
    Mek im tek weh himself.He needs to go away.
    • 2005, Kamau Brathwaite, The Development of Creole Society in Jamaica, 1770-1820 (in English), →ISBN, page 239:
      “An im seh, Yu nyaam me peas today? Him seh, nuo ma, me no eat non. []
      And he said, did you eat my peas today? He said, no ma, I didn't eat them. []
  2. him
    Shi sen' im a letter wah day.She sent him a letter recently.
    • 1984, Laura Tanna, Jamaican Folk Tales and Oral Histories, →ISBN, page 11:
      “What de poor Bug do? Tek im pon im back an him travel, an him travel, an im travel. []
      What did poor Bug do? He let him go on his back and he travelled on and on. []
  3. his
    Den im res' im han' pan di bench.Then he rested his hand on the bench.
    • 1984, Laura Tanna, Jamaican Folk Tales and Oral Histories, →ISBN, page 11:
      “What de poor Bug do? Tek im pon im back an him travel, an him travel, an im travel. []
      What did poor Bug do? He let him go on his back and he travelled on and on. []
  4. her[1]
    'Im frack look good.Her dress looks good.
  5. she[2]
    Tanya deh yah? — Yeah, man. Im deh yah.Is Tanya here? — Yes, she's here.

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Richard Allsopp, editor (1996) Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage, Kingston, Jamaica: University of the West Indies Press, published 2003, →ISBN, page 292
  2. ^ Richard Allsopp, editor (1996) Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage, Kingston, Jamaica: University of the West Indies Press, published 2003, →ISBN, page 292

Further reading edit

  • im at JamaicanPatwah.com
  • im at majstro.com

Livonian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • i'm

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *imeh.

Noun edit

im

  1. miracle

Marshallese edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Alternative forms edit

Conjunction edit

im

  1. and

Etymology 2 edit

Noun edit

im

  1. a skirmish
  2. a bout
  3. a brawl
  4. a duel
  5. a riot
  6. a hassle

References edit

Middle English edit

Pronoun edit

im

  1. Alternative form of him (him)

Nalca edit

Noun edit

im

  1. sky
  2. heaven

Derived terms edit

Nigerian Pidgin edit

Etymology edit

From English him.

Pronoun edit

im

  1. he
  2. his
  3. she
  4. it

Northern Kurdish edit

Verb edit

im

  1. first-person singular present indicative of bûn.
    Synonym: me

Old Irish edit

Etymology edit

Univerbation of hi (in) +‎ mo (my)

Pronunciation edit

Determiner edit

im

  1. in my
    • c. 800, Würzburg Glosses on the Pauline Epistles, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 499–712, Wb. 14c23
      co beid .i. co mbed a ndéde sin im labrad-sa .i. gáu et fír .i. combad sain a n‑as·berin ó bélib et aní imme·rádin ó chridiu
      so that there may be, i.e. so that those two things might be in my speaking, namely false and true, i.e. so that what I might say with [my] mouth and what I might think with [my] heart might be different

Old Saxon edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Germanic *iz.

Pronoun edit

im

  1. dative of sia: them

Declension edit

Descendants edit

  • Middle Low German: one, gim, jum

Pnar edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Khasian *ʔim. Cognate with Khasi im and Proto-Palaungic *ʔiːm (alive, raw) (whence Riang [Sak] ʔiːm¹ and Blang [La Gang] ʔɪ́m).

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

im

  1. to live

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronoun edit

im

  1. dative of oni
    Ktoś musiał im powiedzieć.Someone must have told them.
  2. dative of one

See also edit

Etymology 2 edit

Conjunction edit

im

  1. introduces a parallel, conditional or comparative statement, placed before the thing being compared to
    im więcej..., tym mniej...the more ..., the less ...
    Im większy głód, tym lepiej smakuje.The greater the hunger, the better [the food] tastes.

Further reading edit

  • im in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin līmus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂leyH- (to smear).

Noun edit

im n (plural imuri)

  1. (uncommon, regional) mud, dirt, filth
    Synonyms: noroi, murdărie, nămol

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Scots edit

Pronoun edit

im

  1. (South Scots, personal) him

Verb edit

im

  1. (South Scots) First person singular simple present form of ti be

See also edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

im (Cyrillic spelling им)

  1. to them (clitic dative plural of ȏn (he))
  2. to them (clitic dative plural of òno (it))
  3. to them (clitic dative plural of òna (she))
  4. (clitic, emphatic, possessive, dative) their, of theirs
    Gdje im je auto?
    Where is their car?

Declension edit

Somali edit

Etymology edit

This verb has been postulated to have a Semitic origin due to its frequent usage with verbal prefixes common in Semitic languages such as timid (you came), yimid (he came), timid (she came), in which case Ge'ez እም (əm, from) is the likeliest source. Others posit these linguistic features to be remnants of Proto-Cushitic.

Verb edit

im/imaad

  1. to come from; to arrive from somewhere

Sumerian edit

Romanization edit

im

  1. Romanization of 𒅎 (im)
  2. Romanization of 𒉎 (im)

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

im (, , , , )

  1. calm; silent; quiet; not talking anymore

Derived terms edit

Derived terms

Anagrams edit

Welsh edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

im

  1. (literary) first-person singular of i