See also: and
U+6A9C, 檜
CJK UNIFIED IDEOGRAPH-6A9C

[U+6A9B]
CJK Unified Ideographs
[U+6A9D]

TranslingualEdit

Han characterEdit

(radical 75, +13, 17 strokes, cangjie input 木人一日 (DOMA), four-corner 48966, composition)

  1. Chinese cypress (Cupressus duclouxiana)
  2. Chinese juniper (Juniperus chinensis)

ReferencesEdit

  • KangXi: page 557, character 11
  • Dai Kanwa Jiten: character 15676
  • Dae Jaweon: page 946, character 18
  • Hanyu Da Zidian (first edition): volume 2, page 1303, character 4
  • Unihan data for U+6A9C

ChineseEdit

trad.
simp.

Glyph originEdit

Pronunciation 1Edit



Rime
Character
Reading # 1/2 2/2
Initial () (28) (28)
Final () (26) (64)
Tone (調) Departing (H) Checked (Ø)
Openness (開合) Closed Closed
Division () I I
Fanqie
Reconstructions
Zhengzhang
Shangfang
/kuɑiH/ /kuɑt̚/
Pan
Wuyun
/kʷɑiH/ /kʷɑt̚/
Shao
Rongfen
/kuɑiH/ /kuɑt̚/
Edwin
Pulleyblank
/kwajH/ /kwat̚/
Li
Rong
/kuɑiH/ /kuɑt̚/
Wang
Li
/kuɑiH/ /kuɑt̚/
Bernard
Karlgren
/kuɑiH/ /kuɑt̚/
Expected
Mandarin
Reflex
guì guo
Expected
Cantonese
Reflex
gui3 gut3
BaxterSagart system 1.1 (2014)
Character
Reading # 1/1
Modern
Beijing
(Pinyin)
guì
Middle
Chinese
‹ kwajH ›
Old
Chinese
/*[k]ˁ[o][p]-s/
English ornament on coffin

Notes for Old Chinese notations in the Baxter–Sagart system:

* Parentheses "()" indicate uncertain presence;
* Square brackets "[]" indicate uncertain identity, e.g. *[t] as coda may in fact be *-t or *-p;
* Angle brackets "<>" indicate infix;
* Hyphen "-" indicates morpheme boundary;

* Period "." indicates syllable boundary.
Zhengzhang system (2003)
Character
Reading # 1/2 2/2
No. 5499 5519
Phonetic
component
Rime
group
Rime
subdivision
3 3
Corresponding
MC rime
Old
Chinese
/*koːbs/ /*koːd/

DefinitionsEdit

  1. Chinese juniper

SynonymsEdit

CompoundsEdit

Pronunciation 2Edit



Rime
Character
Reading # 1/2
Initial () (28)
Final () (26)
Tone (調) Departing (H)
Openness (開合) Closed
Division () I
Fanqie
Reconstructions
Zhengzhang
Shangfang
/kuɑiH/
Pan
Wuyun
/kʷɑiH/
Shao
Rongfen
/kuɑiH/
Edwin
Pulleyblank
/kwajH/
Li
Rong
/kuɑiH/
Wang
Li
/kuɑiH/
Bernard
Karlgren
/kuɑiH/
Expected
Mandarin
Reflex
guì
Expected
Cantonese
Reflex
gui3
BaxterSagart system 1.1 (2014)
Character
Reading # 1/1
Modern
Beijing
(Pinyin)
guì
Middle
Chinese
‹ kwajH ›
Old
Chinese
/*[k]ˁ[o][p]-s/
English ornament on coffin

Notes for Old Chinese notations in the Baxter–Sagart system:

* Parentheses "()" indicate uncertain presence;
* Square brackets "[]" indicate uncertain identity, e.g. *[t] as coda may in fact be *-t or *-p;
* Angle brackets "<>" indicate infix;
* Hyphen "-" indicates morpheme boundary;

* Period "." indicates syllable boundary.
Zhengzhang system (2003)
Character
Reading # 1/2
No. 5499
Phonetic
component
Rime
group
Rime
subdivision
3
Corresponding
MC rime
Old
Chinese
/*koːbs/

DefinitionsEdit

  1. Used in personal names.
    /   ―  Qín Huì  ―  Qin Hui
Usage notesEdit

Its use in personal names is now rare because of Qin Hui (1090-1155), a chancellor of the Southern Song who is widely regarded and condemned as a traitor to the Chinese people for his part in the persecution and execution of his political enemy, Yue Fei, a general who fought for the Song against the Jin dynasty during the Jin–Song Wars.


JapaneseEdit

Shinjitai

Kyūjitai

KanjiEdit

(“Jinmeiyō” kanji used for nameskyūjitai kanji, shinjitai form )

ReadingsEdit

CompoundsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Kanji in this term
ひのき
Jinmeiyō
kun’yomi
Alternative spelling
檜木
 
Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
 
(hinoki): a large Japanese cypress in Daichiji temple in Gifu City.

Compound of (hi, Japanese cypress, see below) +‎ (no, attributive particle) +‎ (ki, tree).[1][2]

The wood and bark was commonly used as tinder, and the term was previously thought to be from (hi, fire) +‎ (no, attributive particle) +‎ (ki, tree). However, later research into ancient kana usage in Old Japanese revealed that had a reading of ⟨pi1, while was read as ⟨pi2, ruling out this derivation.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

(ひのき) (hinoki (kyūjitai, shinjitai )

  1. the Japanese cypress, Chamaecyparis obtusa
Usage notesEdit

As with many terms that name organisms, this term is often spelled in katakana, especially in biological contexts (where it is customary), as ヒノキ.

Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • English: hinoki

Proper nounEdit

(ひのき) (Hinoki (kyūjitai, shinjitai )

  1. a female given name
  2. a surname

Etymology 2Edit

Kanji in this term

Jinmeiyō
kun’yomi

⟨pi1 → */pʲi//ɸi//hi/

From Old Japanese.[1][2][3]

Appears in the Kojiki of 712 C.E..[1]

NounEdit

() (hi (kyūjitai, shinjitai )

  1. (archaic, or in compounds) the Japanese cypress, Chamaecyparis obtusa
Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1988, 国語大辞典(新装版) (Kokugo Dai Jiten, Revised Edition) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN
  3. ^ 1995, 大辞泉 (Daijisen) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan, →ISBN

KoreanEdit

HanjaEdit

(hoe, gwal) (hangeul , , revised hoe, gwal, McCune–Reischauer hoe, kwal, Yale hoy, kwal)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

CompoundsEdit

See alsoEdit


Old JapaneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

(pi1) (kana )

  1. the Japanese cypress, Chamaecyparis obtusa
    • 711712, Kojiki (poem 100)
      ...麻紀佐久美加度...
      ...maki2 saku pi1 no mi1kado1...
      ...this wooded palace of flourishing cypresses...

DescendantsEdit

  • Japanese: (hi, hinoki)

VietnameseEdit

Han characterEdit

: Hán Nôm readings: cối

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.