User:1998alexkane/German Plural

Masculine NounsEdit

Masculine nouns usually form the plural by adding the suffix -e. One-syllable masculine nouns often add umlaut to the stressed vowel (where possible), but not always.

  • der Hund – die Hunde
  • der Arzt – die Ärzte


The e-pluralEdit

The majority of masculine and neuter nouns form the plural with -e. For example:


In addition feminine nouns ending in -nis or -sal form the plural with -e.

The e-plural with umlautEdit

Many nouns form the plural by adding an umlaut and adding -e.

Many masculine nouns:

Some feminine nouns:

One neuter noun: Floß (raft).

The n-pluralEdit

The majority of feminine nouns form the plural with -en. For these nouns ending in -el, er, or e, only -n is added to the end. These never add umlaut except for Werkstatt.

  • Masculine and neuter nouns ending in unstressed -on or -or. Ex.
    Note that the stress shifts in the plural
  • A small group of neuter nouns have this plural ending:
  • A small group of masculine nouns have this plural ending:

Weak NounsEdit

A groups of masculine nouns add -(e)n in every case except the masculine singular. This includes nearly every masculine noun ending in -e.

Replacing the ending with -enEdit

Some nouns, especially those of foreign origin remove their ending and replace it with -en

  • A few feminine nouns replacing -a with -en Ex. Firma – Firmen
  • Feminine nouns ending in -sis and -xis form the plural with -sen and -xen respectively. For example:
    • Basis – Basen
  • Masculine nouns ending in -us and neuter nouns ending in -um. For example:
    • Zentrum – Zentren
    • Rhythmus – Rhythmen
  • A few other foreign nouns:

The r-pluralEdit

Many neuter nouns and a few masculine nouns form the plural with -er. These nouns always add umlaut if possible (the stressed vowel is a, o, au, or u).

The zero-pluralEdit

Nearly all masculine and neuter nouns ending in -en, -er, -el, -chen, or -lein have no plural suffix.

Two neuter nouns (Kloster and Wasser), two feminine nouns (Mutter and Tochter), and the following masculine nouns form the plural solely by adding umlaut.

The s-pluralEdit

Most words borrowed from English or French form the plural by adding -s. In addition acronyms and other parts of speech used as nouns form the plural with -s.

  • die CD – die CDs
  • der Pkw – die Pkws
  • der Akku – die Akkus
  • der Cousin – die Cousins
  • der Job – die Jobs
  • das Handy – die Handys
  • das Lebewohl – die Lebewohls

The s-Plural is used for the identification of family members:

  • die Müllers (multiple people with the last name Müller)

but:

  • der Müller – die Müller (occupation)