arrimar

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Locally documented circa 1300.[1] Related to rima (pile), perhaps from Proto-Celtic *ad (to) + *rīmā (number, count).[2]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

arrimar (first-person singular present arrimo, first-person singular preterite arrimei, past participle arrimado)

  1. (transitive) to add
  2. (transitive) to pile
  3. (transitive) to bring close
  4. (transitive) to support
    • c. 1300, R. Martínez López (ed.), General Estoria. Versión gallega del siglo XIV. Oviedo: Archivum, page 88:
      pensarõ que mellores moradas poderiam aver que as que aviam, et buscarõ mays sobre esto, et tomarõ madeyros que arrymarõ aas pẽnas et aas grandes aruores et cobriã aqueles madeyros dos rramos das aruores et das eruas
      they though that they could get better dwellings than that that they had, so they searched about this, and they took logs that they supported against boulders and against large trees, and they covered them with branches and grasses
  5. (transitive, colloquial) to beat
  6. (takes a reflexive pronoun, colloquial) to live together
  7. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to lean, to get near
  8. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to search for support or protection

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

arrimar

  1. (nautical) to stow, belay

ConjugationEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French arrimer or from a- +‎ rima +‎ -ar.

VerbEdit

arrimar (first-person singular present indicative arrimo, past participle arrimado)

  1. (transitive) to pile up
  2. (transitive) to support
  3. (colloquial, transitive) to beat
  4. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to lean
  5. (takes a reflexive pronoun, transitive with a) to join
  6. (takes a reflexive pronoun, transitive with em) to depend on

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Unknown origin.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

arrimar (first-person singular present arrimo, first-person singular preterite arrimé, past participle arrimado)

  1. to draw near
  2. to hang up (give up doing an activity)
  3. to thwack; bash; hit
  4. (reflexive) to live in sin

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit