See also: ENS, -ens, Ens., and -ēns

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Late Latin ēns(thing), from esse(to be). See entity.

NounEdit

ens ‎(plural enses or entia)

  1. (philosophy) An entity or being; an existing thing, as opposed to a quality or attribute.
    • 1860, John Henry Macmahon, A treatise on metaphysics: chiefly in reference to revealed religion, page 195:
      the Nature of the Supreme Ens
  2. (chemistry, alchemy, now historical) Something supposed to condense within itself all the virtues and qualities of a substance from which it is extracted; an essence, an active principle.
    • 2006, Philip Ball, The Devil's Doctor, Arrow 2007, p. 245:
      Here he states that there are five ‘active principles’ – the five Enses or entia – that influence our bodies and give rise to disease […].

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected forms.

NounEdit

ens

  1. plural of en

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronounEdit

ens ‎(proclitic, enclitic nos, contracted enclitic 'ns)

  1. us (direct or indirect object)

DeclensionEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse eins, from Middle Low German eines.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ens

  1. identical
  2. alike

PronounEdit

ens

  1. genitive of en

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Formed as a present participle of sum(to be) in Medieval Latin (and therefore unknown in the Classical period) by analogy with the Ancient Greek present participle ὤν(ṓn), thereby using the bare present participle ending -ēns of second and third conjugation verbs. See also essentia for a similar formation.

The original present participle sōns had taken on the meaning "guilty" in the Classical period, but the still productive combining form -sēns present in the verbs absum (absēns(absent)) and praesum (praesēns(present)) was ignored in creating this form.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ēns n ‎(genitive entis); third declension

  1. being
    • 13th c., Boetius of Dacia
      Ens autem aeternum nullum sequitur in duratione; ergo mundus non est aeternus. - Nothing follows the Eternal Being (God) in duration; therefore, the world isn't eternal.

DescendantsEdit

ParticipleEdit

ēns m, f, n ‎(genitive entis); third declension

  1. being

DeclensionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative ens enta
genitive entis entum
dative entī entibus
accusative ens enta
ablative ente entibus
vocative ens enta

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French ens.

PrepositionEdit

ens

  1. in; inside

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin intus.

PrepositionEdit

ens

  1. in; inside

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle French: ens

SwedishEdit