Contents

AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch doen, from Middle Dutch doen, from Old Dutch duon, from Proto-Germanic *dōną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁-.

VerbEdit

doen ‎(present doen, present participle doenende, past participle gedoen or gedoet)

  1. to do

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch doen, from Old Dutch duon, from Proto-Germanic *dōną, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéh₁t.

VerbEdit

doen

  1. to do
  2. to put
    Doe dat daar maar in.
    Just put it in there.
  3. (auxiliary) to cause to, to make; forms causative verbs
InflectionEdit
Inflection of doen (strong, irregular)
infinitive doen
past singular deed
past participle gedaan
infinitive doen
gerund doen n
verbal noun
present tense past tense
1st person singular doe deed
2nd person sing. (jij) doet deed
2nd person sing. (u) doet deed
2nd person sing. (gij) doet deedt
3rd person singular doet deed
plural doen deden
subjunctive sing.1 doe dede
subjunctive plur.1 doen deden
imperative sing. doe
imperative plur.1 doet
participles doend gedaan
1) Archaic.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Gerund of the verb doen.

NounEdit

doen n ‎(uncountable)

  1. routine
    De mensen zijn uit hun doen, maar schikken zich wel.
    The people are outside of their routine, but do accomodate themselves.

LuxembourgishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • dinn (chiefly south-western dialects; remains common)
  • dunn (dated)

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German duon, a northern variety of tuon, from Proto-Germanic *dōną. The phonetically regular form is dunn. The form doen seems to be a backformation from the past participle by analogy with verbs such as droen, schloen.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

doen ‎(third-person singular present deet, preterite doung, past participle gedoen, past subjunctive déit or déing, auxiliary verb hunn)

  1. to do
  2. to make, cause

Usage notesEdit

  • The verb is overall rare and widely replaced with maachen (even in many cases where German would use tun rather than machen).
  • The preterite doung is obsolete in general Luxembourgish, whereas the subjunctive déit (déing) still sees some usage as an alternative auxiliary for the conditional tense: ech déit soen (“I would say”) instead of ech géif soen, ech géing soen.

ConjugationEdit

Irregular with past tense
infinitive doen
participle gedoen
auxiliary hunn
present
indicative
past
indicative
conditional imperative
1st singular doen doung déing
2nd singular dees doungs déings do
3rd singular deet doung déing
1st plural doen doungen déingen
2nd plural dot doungt déingt dot
3rd plural doen doungen déingen
(n) or (nn) indicates the Eifeler Regel.

Derived termsEdit


Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch duon, from Proto-Germanic *dōną.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

doen

  1. to do

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

doen m, n

  1. definite masculine singular of do

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

doen m, n

  1. definite masculine singular of do

WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • delen (colloquial)
  • desen (colloquial)
  • dethen (colloquial)
  • deuem (literary, first-person plural)
  • deuent (literary, third-person plural)
  • doem (literary, first-person plural)
  • doent (literary, third-person plural)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

doen

  1. (colloquial) first-person singular conditional of dod
  2. (colloquial) third-person singular conditional of dod

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
doen ddoen noen unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.
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