vouch

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French voucher, from Latin vocāre, present active infinitive of vocō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vouch (third-person singular simple present vouches, present participle vouching, simple past and past participle vouched)

  1. To take responsibility for; to express confidence in; to witness; to obtest.
  2. To warrant; to maintain by affirmations; to attest; to affirm; to avouch.
    • Atterbury
      They made him ashamed to vouch the truth of the relation, and afterwards to credit it.
  3. To back; to support; to confirm.
    • Milton
      Me damp horror chilled / At such bold words vouched with a deed so bold.
  4. To call into court to warrant and defend, or to make good a warranty of title.
    • Blackstone
      He vouches the tenant in tail, who vouches over the common vouchee.
  5. (obsolete) To call; to summon.
    • Sir T. Elyot
      [They] vouch (as I might say) to their aid the authority of the writers.
  6. To bear witness; to give testimony or full attestation.
    • Jonathan Swift
      He will not believe her until the elector of Hanover shall vouch for the truth of what she has [] affirmed.
  7. To call as a witness.
    • Dryden
      Vouch the silent stars and conscious moon.
  8. To assert; to aver; to declare.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

vouch (plural vouches)

  1. Warrant; attestation.
Last modified on 10 January 2014, at 18:16