See also: sie, šie, and się

Central FranconianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • Siet (northernmost Ripuarian)
  • Sick (Kölsch)
  • Seck (most other Ripuarian)
  • Seit (Moselle Franconian)

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German *sīda, northern variant of sīta, from Proto-Germanic *sīdǭ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Sie f (plural Sijje)

  1. (westernmost Ripuarian) side
    Jank op Sie!Go aside!
  2. (westernmost Ripuarian) page

GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • -se, Se (colloquial, rare spelling)

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

Sie

  1. you (polite; singular and plural)
    Was möchten Sie, Frau Wagner?
    What would you like to have, Mrs. Wagner?

Usage notesEdit

  • The German Sie expresses distance in the relation between two persons. It is not perfectly correct to say that it expresses respect. Sie has never been used to address gods and saints. Towards parents it was only briefly used during the 18th century by some of the upper classes. (In both of these cases, however, Ihr was formerly possible alongside du.) Even royal highnesses used to be addressed as du, albeit not personally but in songs and poems (compare the famous "Heil dir im Siegerkranz").
  • Sie is identical in form to the third person plural pronoun sie (they) and takes the same verb form. The "polite" Sie is distinguished in writing by capitalization. The only form which is not capitalized is the reflexive sich. When addressing a person with Sie, one generally needs to replace the third person plural pronoun with the demonstrative die ("those ones") to avoid confusion: Wissen Sie, was die zu mir gesagt haben? − “Do you know what they said to me?”

DeclensionEdit

  • The genitive case Ihrer is more and more rarely used in modern German.
  • The genitive case Ihrer does not express ownership, so it must not be confused with the possessive pronoun Ihr, which is declined by gender, singular/plural and case.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Compare German Sie.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

Sie

  1. polite form of du; you

DeclensionEdit