See also: Mich, MICH, Mich., mích, and mịch

English edit

Verb edit

mich (third-person singular simple present miches, present participle miching, simple past and past participle miched)

  1. Alternative form of mitch

Anagrams edit

Cimbrian edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German mich (me). Cognate with German mich.

Pronoun edit

mich

  1. (Sette Comuni) accusative of ich: me

See also edit

References edit

  • “mich” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Coatepec Nahuatl edit

Noun edit

mich

  1. fish.

German edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German mich, from Old High German mih, from Proto-Germanic *mek, from Proto-Indo-European *me (me).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /mɪç/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Pronoun edit

mich

  1. accusative of ich: me

Further reading edit

  • mich” in Duden online
  • mich” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Hunsrik edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German mich, from Old High German mih, from Proto-Germanic *mek, from Proto-Indo-European *me (me).

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

mich

  1. stressed and unstressed accusative of ich: me.

Inflection edit

Further reading edit

Limburgish edit

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (most dialects) IPA(key): /mɪx/
  • (Maastricht) IPA(key): /mix/
  • (Cleverlandic dialects) IPA(key): /mɪk/

Pronoun edit

mich

  1. accusative of ich: me

Lower Sorbian edit

Alternative forms edit

  • (obsolete, dialectal) mnich

Etymology edit

From earlier mnich, from Old High German munih,[1] from Proto-West Germanic *munik, from Late Latin monicus, from Latin monachus, from Ancient Greek μονᾰχός (monakhós, solitary, single).

Compare Upper Sorbian mnich, Old Czech mnich, Old Church Slavonic мънихъ (mŭnixŭ).

Noun edit

mich m pers (feminine mniška or mnichowka, diminutive mišk)

  1. monk

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

nouns
adjectives

References edit

  1. ^ Schuster-Šewc, Heinz (1984), “mnich”, in Historisch-etymologisches Wörterbuch der ober- und niedersorbischen Sprache [Historical-Etymological Dictionary of the Upper and Lower Sorbian Language] (in German), issue 13 (mjetło – njedara), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, →ISBN, page 936

Further reading edit

  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928), “mich”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999), “mich”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Middle High German edit

Etymology edit

From Old High German mih, from Proto-Germanic *mek, from Proto-Indo-European *me (me).

Pronoun edit

mich

  1. me: accusative singular of ich

Descendants edit

  • Alemannic German: mich, mi
  • Central Franconian: mich
  • Cimbrian: mich
  • East Central German: mihch, mich, miech
  • German: mich
  • Hunsrik: mich
  • Luxembourgish: mech
  • Pennsylvania German: mich
  • Yiddish: ⁧מיך(mikh)

Old Swedish edit

Pronoun edit

mich

  1. Alternative form of mik (Late Old Swedish)

Pennsylvania German edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German mich. Compare German mich.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

mich

  1. accusative of ich: me

Declension edit

Polish edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /mix/
  • Rhymes: -ix
  • Syllabification: mich

Noun edit

mich f

  1. genitive plural of micha

West Frisian edit

Etymology edit

From Old Frisian *megge, from Proto-West Germanic *muggju.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

mich c (plural miggen, diminutive michje)

  1. fly
  2. mosquito
  3. shorty; short person

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit

  • mich”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011