See also: Dir, Dir., dir-, dír-, and dîr

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dir (plural dirs)

  1. Abbreviation of direction.
  2. (computing) Abbreviation of directory.
  3. Abbreviation of director.

AdjectiveEdit

dir (not comparable)

  1. Abbreviation of direct.

AdverbEdit

dir

  1. Abbreviation of directly.

AnagramsEdit


AragoneseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dicere.

VerbEdit

dir

  1. to say

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin īre, present active infinitive of ; the forms beginning with V from corresponding forms of vādō; the forms beginning with F from the corresponding forms of sum.

VerbEdit

dir

  1. to go

ConjugationEdit

From http://ast.oslin.org/index.php?action=lemma&lemma=17232


BretonEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dir m

  1. steel

CatalanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dīcere, present active infinitive of dīcō, from Proto-Italic *deikō, from Proto-Indo-European *déyḱti (to show, point out). Compare Occitan dire or díser, French dire, and Spanish decir.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dir (first-person singular present dic, past participle dit)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to say, to pronounce
  2. (transitive) to say, to tell
    Va dir una mentida.
    She told a lie.
    El dèiem que cuinés el sopar.
    We told him to cook dinner.
  3. (transitive) to call, to refer to as
  4. (reflexive) to be named, to be called
    Com et dius?What's your name?

ConjugationEdit

Balearic has deis as the second-person plural present indicative form. This is similar to French dire having dites as the standard form instead of the expected disez, and contemporary Italian dire having dite as the standard form in place of the expected dicete.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German dir, from Old High German dir, from Proto-West Germanic *þiʀ, from Proto-Germanic *þiz.

PronunciationEdit

  • (standard) IPA(key): /diːɐ̯/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːɐ̯
  • (colloquially in unstressed position) IPA(key): /dɐ/, /də/

PronounEdit

dir

  1. (personal) dative of du; you, to you.
  2. (reflexive) dative of du; yourself, to yourself.

Further readingEdit

  • dir” in Duden online

Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French dire (to say).

VerbEdit

dir

  1. (Saint-Domingue) to say, to tell
    Mo prié vou tant seulement vou pas dir personne à rien.I just ask that you don't tell anyone a thing.

DescendantsEdit

  • Haitian Creole: di

ReferencesEdit

  • S.J Ducoeurjoly, Manuel des habitans de Saint-Domingue, contenant un précis de l'histoire de cette île

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

dir

  1. Apocopic form of dire

LuxembourgishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • der (unstressed)

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old High German dir.

PronounEdit

dir

  1. second-person singular, dative: you; thee
    Ech hunn dir e Bréif geschéckt.
    I have sent you a letter.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old High German ir. The d- is through unetymological segmentation of the ending -t of a preceding verb (*stitt ir*stiddirstitt dir). This development was assisted by a parallelism with the 1st person, in which the dative singular mir is also the nominative plural (this latter development occurred for a similar reason, but was earlier and is widespread throughout High German).

PronounEdit

dir

  1. second-person plural, nominative: you; you all; ye
    Hutt dir gutt geschlof?
    Have you slept well?
Derived termsEdit
  • Dir (singular and plural polite form)

DeclensionEdit


Old OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a contraction of Latin dīcō, dīcere.

VerbEdit

dir

  1. to say

DescendantsEdit


Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German dir, from Old High German dir, from Proto-West Germanic *þiʀ, from Proto-Germanic *þiz. Compare German dir.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

dir

  1. to you

DeclensionEdit


RomanschEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin dūrus.

AdjectiveEdit

dir m (feminine singular dira, masculine plural dirs, feminine plural diras)

  1. (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Rumantsch Grischun) hard
Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From a contraction of Latin dīcō, dīcere, from Proto-Italic *deikō, from Proto-Indo-European *deyḱ- (to show, point out). The origin of some forms starting with sch- likely result from regular elisions of unstressed syllables: dīcēbam*dcéβascheva.

VerbEdit

dir

  1. to say
ConjugationEdit
Alternative formsEdit
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Puter, Vallader) dir
  • (Sutsilvan) gir
  • (Surmiran) deir

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

dir m (plural dirs)

  1. (anatomy, Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) liver
Alternative formsEdit
SynonymsEdit

SomaliEdit

VerbEdit

dir

  1. send

TolaiEdit

PronounEdit

dir

  1. Third-person dual pronoun: they two, them two

DeclensionEdit



VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a contraction of Latin dīcere (compare Italian dire), present active infinitive of dīcō.

VerbEdit

dir

  1. (transitive) to say, tell
  2. (transitive) to affirm

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dir

  1. Soft mutation of tir (land).

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
tir dir nhir thir
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.