quidam

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quīdam.

NounEdit

quidam ‎(plural quidams)

  1. A nobody; a person of no importance. [from 16th c.]
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, III.12:
      A quidam gallant determined upon a time to surprise both my house and my selfe.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quī (pronoun) + -dam (demonstrative ending).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

quīdam m, quaedam f, quiddam n

  1. someone, a certain one/thing; something

Usage notesEdit

Do not confuse with quidem.

DeclensionEdit

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative quīdam quaedam quiddam quīdam quaedam
genitive cuiusdam /
cujusdam
quōrundam quārundam quōrundam
dative cuidam quibusdam
accusative quendam quandam quiddam quōsdam quāsdam quaedam
ablative quōdam quādam quōdam quibusdam


AdjectiveEdit

quīdam m, quaedam f, quoddam n

  1. Certain (person or thing), some (person or thing), one [in the sense of "a specific"] (person or thing not previously introduced in the present discourse).

DeclensionEdit

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative quīdam quaedam quoddam quīdam quaedam
genitive cuiusdam /
cujusdam
quōrundam quārundam quōrundam
dative cuidam quibusdam
accusative quendam quandam quoddam quōsdam quāsdam quaedam
ablative quōdam quādam quōdam quibusdam


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • quidam” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
Read in another language