Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quīdam.

NounEdit

quidam ‎(plural quidams)

  1. A nobody; a person of no importance. [from 16th c.]
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, III.12:
      A quidam gallant determined upon a time to surprise both my house and my selfe.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin quī (pronoun) + -dam (demonstrative ending).

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

quīdam m, quaedam f, quiddam n

  1. someone, a certain one/thing; something

Usage notesEdit

Do not confuse with quidem.

DeclensionEdit

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative quīdam quaedam quiddam quīdam quaedam
genitive cuiusdam
cujusdam
quōrundam quārundam quōrundam
dative cuidam quibusdam
accusative quendam quandam quiddam quōsdam quāsdam quaedam
ablative quōdam quādam quōdam quibusdam


AdjectiveEdit

quīdam m, quaedam f, quoddam n

  1. Certain (person or thing), some (person or thing), one [in the sense of "a specific"] (person or thing not previously introduced in the present discourse).

DeclensionEdit

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative quīdam quaedam quoddam quīdam quaedam
genitive cuiusdam
cujusdam
quōrundam quārundam quōrundam
dative cuidam quibusdam
accusative quendam quandam quoddam quōsdam quāsdam quaedam
ablative quōdam quādam quōdam quibusdam


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit