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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (US) IPA(key): /aɪɹ/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /aɪ.ə(ɹ)/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(r)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ire, yre, shortened form of iren (iron). More at iron.

NounEdit

ire

  1. (obsolete) Iron.
    • Chaucer
      the cruel ire, red as any gleed

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English ire, from Old French ire (ire), from Latin īra (wrath, rage), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁eysh₂- (to fall upon, act sharply) (compare Old English ofost (haste, zeal), Old Norse eisa (to race forward), Ancient Greek ἱερός (hierós, supernatural, holy), οἶστρος (oîstros, frenzy; gadfly), Avestan 𐬀𐬈𐬯𐬨𐬀(aesma, anger), Sanskrit एषति (eṣati, to drive on)).

NounEdit

ire (uncountable)

  1. (literary, poetic) Great anger; wrath; keen resentment.
    • Geoffrey Chaucer's The Knight's Tale.
      That lord is now of Thebes the Citee,
      Fulfild of ire and of iniquitee,
      He, for despit and for his tirannye,
      To do the dede bodyes vileynye,
      Of alle oure lordes, whiche that been slawe,
      Hath alle the bodyes on an heep ydrawe,
      And wol nat suffren hem, by noon assent,
      Neither to been yburyed nor ybrent.
    • John Sidney
      She lik'd not his desire; Fain would be free, but dreaded parents' ire.
    • John Gower, Confessio Amantis.
      "My good father, tell me this;
      "What thing is ire?
      Sonne, it is That in our English wrath is hote."
    • William Shakespeare, Henry IV.
      If I digg'd up thy forefathers graves, And hung their rotten coffins up in chains, It could not slake mine ire, nor ease my heart.
    • John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book IX.
      Or Neptune's ire, or Juno's, that so long Perplex'd the Greek and Cytherea's son.
    • John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book X.
      The sentence, from thy head remov'd, may light On me, sole cause to thee of all this woe; Me! me! only just object of his ire.
    • John Dryden
      For this th' avenging pow'r employs his darts, And empties all his quiver in our hearts; Thus will persist, relentless in his ire, 'Till the fair slave be render'd to her sire
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

ire (third-person singular simple present ires, present participle iring, simple past and past participle ired)

  1. (transitive) To anger; to fret; to irritate.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DongxiangEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Mongolic *ire-, compare Mongolian ирэх (ireh), Daur irgw.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ire

  1. to come

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin īra.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ire f (plural ires)

  1. (archaic, literary or poetic) ire, anger
    Synonym: colère

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

ire f

  1. plural of ira

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin īre, present active infinitive of .

VerbEdit

ire

  1. (obsolete, regional, literary) to go

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

īre

  1. present active infinitive of

ReferencesEdit

  • ire in The Perseus Project (1999) Perseus Encyclopedia[1]

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

DeterminerEdit

ire

  1. Alternative form of hire

PronounEdit

ire

  1. Alternative form of hire

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

PronounEdit

ire

  1. Alternative form of hire

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English ēare.

NounEdit

ire

  1. Alternative form of ere (ear)

Etymology 4Edit

DeterminerEdit

ire

  1. Alternative form of here (their)
ReferencesEdit

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French ire < Latin īra.

NounEdit

ire f (plural ires)

  1. ire; rage; fury

DescendantsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

ire m (definite singular iren, indefinite plural irer, definite plural irene)

  1. person from Ireland, Irishman.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

ire m (definite singular iren, indefinite plural irar, definite plural irane)

  1. person from Ireland, Irishman.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin īra.

NounEdit

ire f (oblique plural ires, nominative singular ire, nominative plural ires)

  1. ire, anger, rage

DescendantsEdit

  • English: ire (borrowed)
  • French: ire (now rare)

ReferencesEdit


Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *hiz.

PronounEdit

ire

  1. Alternative form of ira

DeclensionEdit


PortugueseEdit