See also: Himself

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English hymself, from Old English him selfum. Equivalent to him +‎ -self.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /hɪmˈsɛlf/, /ɪ̈msɛlf/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛlf
  • Hyphenation: him‧self

Pronoun edit

himself (the third person singular, masculine, personal pronoun, reflexive form of he, feminine herself, neuter itself, plural themselves, gender-neutral singular himself or themselves or themself)

  1. (reflexive) Him; the male object of a verb or preposition that also appears as the subject
    He injured himself.
  2. (emphatic) He; used as an intensifier, often to emphasize that the referent is the exclusive participant in the predicate
    He was injured himself.
  3. (Ireland, otherwise archaic) The subject or non-reflexive object of a predicate; he himself.
    • 1603, Michel de Montaigne, chapter 7, in John Florio, transl., The Essayes [], book II, London: [] Val[entine] Simmes for Edward Blount [], →OCLC:
      Yet it is that himselfe had been liberally gratified by his Unkle with militarie rewards, before ever he went to warres.
    • Sir John Denham (1614-1669)
      With shame remembers, while himself was one / Of the same herd, himself the same had done.
    • 1998, Kirk Jones, Waking Ned, Tomboy films:
      Dennis: His glass is there and himself is in the toilet.
  4. (Ireland) The subject or non-reflexive object of a predicate; he (used of upper-class gentlemen, or sarcastically, of men who imagine themselves to be more important than others)
    Has himself come down to breakfast yet?
    Have you seen himself yet this morning?

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

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Further reading edit

Anagrams edit