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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bum (buttocks, bottom), a syncopated form of Middle English botym (bottom). Compare also Old Irish, Scottish Gaelic bun (base, bottom). More at bottom.

NounEdit

bum (plural bums)

  1. The buttocks.
    Okay, everyone sit on your bum and try and touch your toes.
  2. (Britain, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand, informal, rare, Canada, US) The anus.
  3. (by metonymy, informal) A person.
Usage notesEdit
  • In Canada, bum is considered the most appropriate term when speaking to young children, as in Everyone please sit on your bum and we'll read a story. In the United States, bum is not often used in this sense (though this may vary from dialect to dialect) except in conscious imitation of British English. The term butt is the most common term in North America except in professional contexts such as medical, legal, and scientific where buttocks is generally used or gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, etc. for the muscles specifically. Glutes is often used in sports medicine and bodybuilding. Ass (originally a dialectal variant of arse) is considered vulgar in North America, whereas backside, behind, and bottom are considered to be non-specific terms.
QuotationsEdit
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (Britain, transitive, colloquial) To sodomize; to engage in anal sex.

InterjectionEdit

bum

  1. (Britain) An expression of annoyance.
    • 2010, Jill Mansell, Sheer Mischief:
      Maxine tried hers. 'Oh bum,' she said crossly. 'The sugar isn't sugar. It's salt.'

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

1864, back-formation from bummer, from German Bummler (loafer), from bummeln (loaf)

NounEdit

bum (plural bums)

  1. (Canada, US, colloquial, sometimes derogatory) A homeless person, usually a man.
  2. (Canada, US, Australia, colloquial) A lazy, incompetent, or annoying person, usually a man.
    Fred is becoming a bum - he's not even bothering to work more than once a month.
    That mechanic's a bum - he couldn't fix a yo-yo.
    That guy keeps interrupting the concert. Throw the bum out!
  3. (Canada, US, Australia, colloquial, sports) A player or racer who often performs poorly.
    Trade him to another team, he's a bum!
  4. (colloquial) A drinking spree.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (transitive, colloquial) To ask someone to give one (something) for free; to beg for something.
    Can I bum a cigarette off you?
  2. (intransitive, colloquial) To behave like a hobo or vagabond; to loiter.
    I think I'll just bum around downtown for awhile until dinner.
  3. (transitive, slang, Britain) To wet the end of a marijuana cigarette (spliff).
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bum (comparative bummer, superlative bummest)

  1. Of poor quality or highly undesirable.
    bum note
  2. Unfair.
    bum deal
  3. Injured and without the possibility of full repair, defective.
    I can't play football anymore on account of my bum knee.
  4. Unpleasant.
    He had a bum trip on that mescaline.
QuotationsEdit
SynonymsEdit
  • (defective): duff (UK)
TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Back-formation from bum out.

VerbEdit

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. To depress; to make unhappy.

ReferencesEdit

  • bum” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

Etymology 4Edit

See boom.

NounEdit

bum (plural bums)

  1. (dated) A humming noise.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)

VerbEdit

bum (third-person singular simple present bums, present participle bumming, simple past and past participle bummed)

  1. (intransitive) To make a murmuring or humming sound.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)

Etymology 5Edit

Abbreviations.

NounEdit

bum (plural bums)

  1. (obsolete) A bumbailiff.
    • 1705, Bernard Mandeville, The Fable of the Bees:
      About her Chariot, and behind, / Were Sergeants, Bums of every kind, / Tip-staffs, and all those Officers, / That squeeze a Living out of Tears.

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

NounEdit

bum ?

  1. (economics) boom

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

bum m (genitive singular bum, nominative plural bumanna)

  1. (sailing) boom

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
bum bhum mbum
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

MizoEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bum

  1. swindle
  2. cheat
  3. trick

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

bum

  1. boom! (sound of explosion)
  2. bang! (any brief, sharp, loud noise)

PortugueseEdit

InterjectionEdit

bum!

  1. boom (sound of explosion)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

VerbEdit

bum (Cyrillic spelling бум)

  1. (Kajkavian) first-person singular future form of biti.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Onomatopoeic.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

bum

  1. boom

Transylvanian SaxonEdit

NounEdit

bum m

  1. tree

ReferencesEdit


VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bum (plural bums)

  1. act of building

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

bum

  1. Soft mutation of pum (five).

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
pum bum mhum phum
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.