See also: Dy, DY, , , d.y., d'y, dy-, and dy.

English

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English dyen, variant of dien (to die). More at die.

Verb

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dy

  1. Obsolete form of die.

Etymology 2

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Clipping of already.

Adverb

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dy

  1. (text messaging) already

See also

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Anagrams

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Afrikaans

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Etymology

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From Dutch dij, from Middle Dutch die, from Old Dutch *thio, from Proto-Germanic *þeuhą.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [də̟i̯]
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

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dy (plural dye, diminutive dytjie)

  1. thigh

Albanian

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Albanian cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : dy
    Ordinal : dytë

Etymology

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From Proto-Albanian *duwō masc, *duwai fem, from Proto-Indo-European *dwóh₁.[1] Matzinger reconstructs *duu̯a.[2]

Pronunciation

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Numeral

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dy

  1. two
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References

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  1. ^ Orel, Vladimir E. (1998) “dy”, in Albanian Etymological Dictionary, Leiden, Boston, Köln: Brill, →ISBN, page 79
  2. ^ Schumacher, Stefan, Matzinger, Joachim (2013) Die Verben des Altalbanischen: Belegwörterbuch, Vorgeschichte und Etymologie (Albanische Forschungen; 33) (in German), Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, →ISBN, page 216

Central Mazahua

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Pronunciation

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Letter

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dy (upper case Dy)

  1. A letter of the Mazahua alphabet.

Danish

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Etymology

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Uncertain, possibly from Middle Low German dōgen (to suffer, endure), from Proto-Germanic *daugijaną, cognate with Dutch dogen (dialect).

Verb

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dy (past tense dyede, past participle dyet)

  1. (reflexive) to restrain oneself, to help oneself
    • 2012, Richard Russo, Åndernes rige, Klim, →ISBN:
      Han er egentlig for klog til det, men han kan ikke dy sig.
      He is actually too clever for it, but he cannot help himself.
    • 2010, Mette Winge, Et udestående: - en provisorietidsroman, Gyldendal A/S, →ISBN:
      Han var lige ved at tilføje at der ikke havde været anført noget om sagen i de franske aviser, men han dyede sig, for politiinspektøren hørte ikke til dem man opmuntrede med vitser.
      He was just about to add that there had been no note of the case in the French papers, but he restrained himself, for the police inspector did not belong to those people that one cheered up with jokes.
    • 2009, Hanne Reintoft, Hjertebånd, ArtPeople, →ISBN:
      De havde dyet sig og nøjedes med den tilmålte ration uden at stikke fingrene hverken i slunkne melsække eller halvtomme sulekar.
      They had restrained themselves and made do with the measured ration without sticking their fingers in lacking flour bags, nor in half-empty meat jars.

Conjugation

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References

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Egyptian

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Romanization

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dy

  1. Alternative transliteration of dj.

Lower Sorbian

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Pronunciation

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Adverb

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dy

  1. Alternative form of gdy.

Further reading

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  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928) “dy”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999) “dy”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Middle English

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Noun

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dy

  1. Alternative form of dee

Middle French

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Verb

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dy

  1. first-person singular present indicative of dire

Silesian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈdɪ/
  • Rhymes: -dɪ
  • Syllabification: dy

Conjunction

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dy

  1. Alternative form of gdy

Further reading

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  • dy in silling.org

Swedish

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Etymology

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From Old Norse , related to dýja (to shake, tremble), from Proto-Germanic *dūjan- (to tremble), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewh₂- (smoke, mist).

Noun

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dy c

  1. mud, mire, sludge

Declension

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Declension of dy 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative dy dyn
Genitive dys dyns

Derived terms

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See also

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Further reading

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Traveller Norwegian

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Etymology

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Inherited from Romani duj.

Numeral

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dy

  1. two
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References

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  • dy” in Norwegian Romani Dictionary.
  • dy” in Tavringens Rakripa: Romanifolkets Ordbok, Landsorganisasjonen for Romanifolket.

Vilamovian

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Pronunciation

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Article

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dy (definite, feminine and plural form of dyr)

  1. The; declined form of dyr

Welsh

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Alternative forms

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  • d' (before vowels)
  • 'th (after vowels)

Etymology

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From Proto-Celtic *towe (your); compare Cornish dha, Breton da, Irish do. See ti (you).

Pronunciation

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Determiner

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dy (triggers soft mutation of a following consonant)

  1. your (familiar singular)
    Beth sy yn dy dŷ di?
    What's in your house?

Pronoun

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dy (triggers soft mutation of a following consonant)

  1. you (familiar singular; as the direct object of a verbal noun)
    Beth sy'n dy gnoi di?
    What's worrying/annoying you?

Usage notes

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  • After the noun or verbnoun which dy precedes, di is often added (or ti after bod when used to initiate a content clause). In formal language, this is done to emphasise the determiner or pronoun. In colloquial language, it is not necessarily an indicator of emphasis, and is often included with the determiner and always included with the pronoun. The exception to the latter case is in passive constructions employing cael, where di is never used.
  • In formal Welsh, contractions of dy include d' before a vowel-initial words in poetic language and 'th after mostly functional vowel-final words. In colloquial Welsh, these contractions are not used in writing although dy /də/ is often pronounced /d/ before vowel-initial words in rapid speech and so esentially becoming d'.
  • Pronomial dy can occur before any verbal noun. Before a verb, pronomial 'th is found only in literary language after certain vowel-final preverbal particles. See entry for 'th for more information.

Further reading

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  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “dy”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

West Frisian

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Etymology 1

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From Old Frisian thī, from Proto-West Germanic *siz, from Proto-Germanic *sa (that, the). Compare Dutch die, English the.

Pronunciation

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Determiner

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dy

  1. that, those
Inflection
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  • Common singular: dy
  • Neuter singular: dat
  • Plural: dy
Further reading
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  • dy (I)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Etymology 2

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From Old Frisian thī, from Proto-Germanic *þiz.

Pronunciation

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Pronoun

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dy

  1. object of do ("thou"), thee
Further reading
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  • dy (II)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

Xhosa

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Pronunciation

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Letter

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dy (upper case Dy)

  1. A digraph in Xhosa orthography.