See also: ail-, -ail, àil, áil, -áil, and Äil

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English eilen, from Old English eġlan, eġlian (to trouble, afflict), from Proto-West Germanic *aglijan, from Proto-Germanic *aglijaną (to trouble, vex), cognate with Gothic 𐌰𐌲𐌻𐌾𐌰𐌽 (agljan, to distress).

VerbEdit

ail (third-person singular simple present ails, present participle ailing, simple past and past participle ailed)

  1. (transitive) To cause to suffer; to trouble, afflict. (Now chiefly in interrogative or indefinite constructions.)
    Have some chicken soup. It's good for what ails you.
    • What aileth thee, Hagar?
    • 2011, "Connubial bliss in America", The Economist:
      Not content with having in 1996 put a Defence of Marriage Act (DOMA) on the statue book, Congress has now begun to hold hearings on a Respect for Marriage Act. Defended, respected: what could possibly ail marriage in America?
  2. (intransitive) To be ill; to suffer; to be troubled.
QuotationsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

ail (plural ails)

  1. (obsolete) An ailment; trouble; illness.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English eyle, eile, from Old English eġle (hideous, loathsome, hateful, horrid, troublesome, grievous, painful). Cognate with Gothic 𐌰𐌲𐌻𐌿𐍃 (aglus, hard, difficult).

AdjectiveEdit

ail (comparative ailer or more ail, superlative ailest or most ail)

  1. (obsolete) Painful; troublesome.

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English eile, eyle, eiȝle, from Old English eġl (an ail; awn; beard of barley; mote), from Proto-Germanic *agilō (awn), related to *ahaz (ear (of grain)).[1] Cognate with German Achel, Egel, Ägel.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ail (plural ails)

  1. The awn of barley or other types of corn.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge (1883), “Achel”, in John Francis Davis, transl., Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, published 1891

AnagramsEdit


DalmatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin allium.

NounEdit

ail

  1. (Vegliot) garlic

ReferencesEdit

  • Ive, A. (1886), “L'antico dialetto di Veglia [The old dialect of Veglia]”, in G. I. Ascoli, editor, Archivio glottologico italiano [Italian linguistic archive], volume 9, Rome: E. Loescher, pages 115–187

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Latin allium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ail m (plural ails or aulx)

  1. garlic

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Haitian Creole: lay (from l'ail)
  • Mauritian Creole: lay (from l'ail)
  • Moore: lay (from l'ail)

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish ail (boulder, rock), from Proto-Celtic *ɸales-, from Proto-Indo-European *pelis-, *pels- (stone).[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ail f (genitive singular aileach, nominative plural aileacha or ailche)

  1. stone, rock

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ail n-ail hail not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*fales-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 120

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

ail

  1. Alternative form of ale (beer)

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

ail

  1. Alternative form of hayle (hail)

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, from Latin allium.

NounEdit

ail m (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) garlic

Old IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Possibly from Proto-Celtic *ɸalos, from Proto-Indo-European *pels-, *pelis- (rock, cliff), see also German Fels (rock).[1]

The declension was not stable at the start of the Old Irish period, with a shift from an i-stem declension to a k-stem declension ongoing.

NounEdit

ail f (genitive ailech, nominative plural ailich)

  1. rock
  2. foundation
InflectionEdit
Feminine i-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative ail ailL ailiH
Vocative ail ailL ailiH
Accusative ailN ailL ailiH
Genitive aloH, alaH aloH, alaH aileN
Dative ailL ailib ailib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
Feminine k-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative ail ailichL ailich
Vocative ail ailichL ailchea
Accusative ailichN ailichL ailchea
Genitive ailech ailech ailechN
Dative ailichL ailchib ailchib
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization
DescendantsEdit

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
ail unchanged n-ail
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

·ail

  1. third-person singular present indicative conjunct of ailid

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
·ail unchanged ·n-ail
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko (2009), “*fales-”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, →ISBN, page 120

Further readingEdit


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English eilen, from Old English eġlan, eġlian (to trouble, afflict), from Proto-West Germanic *aglijan.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ail (third-person singular simple present ails, present participle ailin, simple past ailt, past participle ailt)

  1. to trouble, afflict (of body or mind)
  2. to hinder, prevent
  3. to be ill

ReferencesEdit


WelshEdit

Welsh numbers (edit)
20
 ←  1 2 3  → [a], [b]
    Cardinal (masculine): dau
    Cardinal (feminine): dwy
    Ordinal: ail, eilfed
    Ordinal abbreviation: 2il
    Adverbial: dwywaith
    Multiplier: dwbl
Welsh Wikipedia article on 2

Alternative formsEdit

  • 2il (abbreviation)

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Welsh eil, from Proto-Brythonic *ėl, from Proto-Celtic *alyos, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂élyos (other).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ail (feminine singular ail, plural ail, not comparable) (precedes the noun, triggers soft mutation of all nouns)

  1. (ordinal number) second
    Synonym: eilfed
    yr ail lawrthe second floor

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal h-prothesis
ail unchanged unchanged hail
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.