See also: -ail

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English eyle, eile, from Old English eġle (hideous, loathsome, hateful, horrid, troublesome, grievous, painful), from Proto-Germanic *agluz (cumbersome, tedious, burdensome, tiresome), from Proto-Indo-European *agʰlo-, *agʰ- (offensive, disgusting, repulsive, hateful). Cognate with Gothic 𐌰𐌲𐌻𐌿𐍃 (aglus, hard, difficult).

AdjectiveEdit

ail (comparative ailer or more ail, superlative ailest or most ail)

  1. (obsolete) Painful; troublesome.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English eġlan, eġlian (to trouble, afflict), cognate with Gothic 𐌰𐌲𐌻𐌾𐌰𐌽 (agljan, to distress).

VerbEdit

ail (third-person singular simple present ails, present participle ailing, simple past and past participle ailed)

  1. (transitive) To cause to suffer; to trouble, afflict. (Now chiefly in interrogative or indefinite constructions.)
    Have some chicken soup. It's good for what ails you.
    • Bible, Genesis xxi. 17
      What aileth thee, Hagar?
    • 2011, "Connubial bliss in America", The Economist:
      Not content with having in 1996 put a Defence of Marriage Act (DOMA) on the statue book, Congress has now begun to hold hearings on a Respect for Marriage Act. Defended, respected: what could possibly ail marriage in America?
  2. (intransitive) To be ill; to suffer; to be troubled.
    • Richardson
      When he ails ever so little [] he is so peevish.
QuotationsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

ail (plural ails)

  1. An ailment; trouble; illness.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old English eġl.

NounEdit

ail (plural ails)

  1. The awn of barley or other types of corn.

AnagramsEdit


DalmatianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin allium.

NounEdit

ail

  1. garlic

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin allium.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ail m (plural ails or aulx)

  1. garlic

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin allium.

NounEdit

ail m (usually uncountable)

  1. garlic

Old IrishEdit

VerbEdit

·ail

  1. third-person singular present indicative conjunct of ailid

WelshEdit

Welsh ordinal numbers
 <  1af 2il 3ydd  > 
    Ordinal : ail
    Cardinal : dau
    Adverbial : dwywaith
    Multiplier : dwbl

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

AdjectiveEdit

ail m & f (plural ail, not comparable)

  1. second

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
ail unchanged unchanged hail
Last modified on 6 April 2014, at 10:37