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See also: Pique and piqué

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Middle French pique (a prick, sting), from Old French pic (a sharp point).[1] Doublet of pike (long pointed weapon). Compare Spanish picar (to sting).

NounEdit

pique (countable and uncountable, plural piques)

  1. A feeling of enmity; ill-feeling, animosity; a transient feeling of wounded pride.
    • (Can we date this quote by Dr. H. More?)
      Men take up piques and displeasures.
    • (Can we date this quote by De Quincey?)
      Wars had arisen [] upon a personal pique.
  2. A feeling of irritation or resentment, awakened by a social slight or injury; offence, especially taken in an emotional sense with little thought or consideration.
    • 2018 April 10, Daniel Taylor, “Liverpool go through after Mohamed Salah stops Manchester City fightback”, in The Guardian (London)[1]:
      Klopp’s team had the better balance between attack and defence and, crucially, they got lucky with the disallowed goal that brought Guardiola to the point of spontaneous combustion at half-time. Guardiola’s fit of pique led to his banishment from the dugout and City will wonder what might have happened if they had taken a 2-0 lead into the second half.
    • 1994, Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom, Abacus 2010, p. 7:
      This defiance was not a fit of pique, but a matter of principle.
    • Sweet Smell of Success (1957) screenplay by Clifford Odets and Ernest Lehman, starring Burt Lancaster as J.J. Hunsecker who says:
      You think this is a personal thing with me? Are you telling me I think of this in terms of a personal pique?
  3. (obsolete) Keenly felt desire; a longing.
    • (Can we date this quote by Hudibras?)
      Though it have the pique, and long, / 'Tis still for something in the wrong.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

pique (third-person singular simple present piques, present participle piquing, simple past and past participle piqued)

  1. (transitive) To wound the pride of; to excite to anger.
    Synonyms: sting, nettle, irritate, fret
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 11
      She treated him indulgently, as if he were a child. He thought he did not mind. But deep below the surface it piqued him.
    • Byron
      Pique her and soothe in turn.
  2. (reflexive) To take pride in; to pride oneself on.
    • John Locke
      Men [] pique themselves upon their skill.
  3. (transitive) To excite (someone) to action by causing resentment or jealousy; to stimulate (a feeling, emotion); to offend by slighting.
    Synonyms: excite, stimulate
    I believe this will pique your interest.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Prior to this entry?)
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From French pic.

NounEdit

pique (plural piques)

  1. (card games) In piquet, the right of the elder hand to count thirty in hand, or to play before the adversary counts one.

VerbEdit

pique (third-person singular simple present piques, present participle piquing, simple past and past participle piqued)

  1. (card games, transitive) To score a pique against.

Etymology 3Edit

From Spanish pique, from Central Quechua piki.

NounEdit

pique (plural piques)

  1. A chigger or jigger, Tunga penetrans.

Etymology 4Edit

From French piqué from past participle of French piquer (to prick, quilt)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pique (countable and uncountable, plural piques)

  1. A durable ribbed fabric made from cotton, rayon, or silk.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ pique” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary, 2001–2018.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pique f (plural piques)

  1. pike, lance
  2. (card games) spade (as a card suit)
    quatre de pique
    four of spades

VerbEdit

pique

  1. first-person singular present indicative of piquer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of piquer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of piquer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of piquer
  5. second-person singular imperative of piquer

See alsoEdit

Suits in French · couleurs (layout · text)
       
cœur carreau pique trèfle

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

pique f (plural piques)

  1. Alternative form of picque

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French picque (a prick, sting), from Old French pic (a sharp point).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pique m (plural piques)

  1. any spear
  2. or specifically a pike
  3. hide-and-seek (game)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

pique

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of picar (sting)
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of picar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of picar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of picar

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

pique m (plural piques)

  1. (card games) spade
  2. downward movement
    irse a pique (sink [for a ship])
    1. jump, leap
  3. hit, fix (of drugs)
  4. rivalry, loggerheads
  5. grudge match

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

pique

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of picar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of picar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of picar.