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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French ange, angle, from Late Latin angelus, from Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɑ̃ʒ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

ange m (plural anges)

  1. angel

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Haitian Creole: zanj

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

ange

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of angō

ReferencesEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French angle, ange, angre, from Late Latin angelus, from Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos, messenger).

NounEdit

ange m (plural anges)

  1. (Jersey, religion) angel
  2. (Jersey) moth

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ange

  1. narrow, straightened, vexed, troubled, sorrowful

ReferencesEdit

  • ange in Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898) An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

ange m (oblique plural anges, nominative singular anges, nominative plural ange)

  1. Alternative form of angle

PaliEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

ange

  1. locative singular of anga

San Pedro Amuzgos AmuzgoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Spanish ángel, from Latin angelus, from Ancient Greek ἄγγελος (ángelos, messenger).

NounEdit

ange

  1. angel

ReferencesEdit

  • Stewart, Cloyd; Stewart, Ruth D.; colaboradores amuzgos (2000) Diccionario amuzgo de San Pedro Amuzgos, Oaxaca (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 44)‎[1] (in Spanish), Coyoacán, D.F.: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, A.C., →ISBN

SwedishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

an +‎ ge, shortened form of angiva, from German angeben

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

ange

  1. to indicate; to point out
  2. to turn in (someone); to point someone out for the police, as being guilty of a crime

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit