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ChineseEdit

 
spring (time); gay; joyful; youthful; love; lust; life
 
day; sun; date; day of the month; Japan (abbrev.)
simp. and trad.
(春日)
 
Wikipedia has an article on:

EtymologyEdit

“Kasuga”
Orthographic borrowing from Japanese 春日 (Kasuga).

PronunciationEdit



Rime
Character
Reading # 1/1 1/1
Initial () (24) (38)
Final () (47) (48)
Tone (調) Level (Ø) Checked (Ø)
Openness (開合) Closed Open
Division () III III
Fanqie
Reconstructions
Zhengzhang
Shangfang
/t͡ɕʰiuɪn/ /ȵiɪt̚/
Pan
Wuyun
/t͡ɕʰʷin/ /ȵit̚/
Shao
Rongfen
/t͡ɕʰjuen/ /ȵʑjet̚/
Edwin
Pulleyblank
/cʰwin/ /ȵit̚/
Li
Rong
/t͡ɕʰiuĕn/ /ȵiĕt̚/
Wang
Li
/t͡ɕʰĭuĕn/ /ȵʑĭĕt̚/
Bernard
Karlgren
/t͡ɕʰi̯uĕn/ /ȵʑi̯ĕt̚/
Expected
Mandarin
Reflex
chūn
BaxterSagart system 1.1 (2014)
Character
Reading # 1/1 1/1
Modern
Beijing
(Pinyin)
chūn
Middle
Chinese
‹ tsyhwin › ‹ nyit ›
Old
Chinese
/*tʰun/ /*C.nik/
English springtime sun; day

Notes for Old Chinese notations in the Baxter–Sagart system:

* Parentheses "()" indicate uncertain presence;
* Square brackets "[]" indicate uncertain identity, e.g. *[t] as coda may in fact be *-t or *-p;
* Angle brackets "<>" indicate infix;
* Hyphen "-" indicates morpheme boundary;

* Period "." indicates syllable boundary.
Zhengzhang system (2003)
Character
Reading # 1/1 1/1
No. 12573 10845
Phonetic
component
Rime
group
Rime
subdivision
2 2
Corresponding
MC rime
Old
Chinese
/*tʰjun/ /*njiɡ/
Notes

NounEdit

春日

  1. (literary) spring; spring days
  2. (literary) spring sun
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
Sino-Xenic (春日):

Proper nounEdit

春日

  1. () Chunri (a mountain indigenous township in Pingtung, Taiwan)
  2. () Kasuga (a city in Fukuoka, Japan)

JapaneseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Kanji in this term
しゅん
Grade: 2
じつ
Grade: 1
kan’on

From Middle Chinese compound 春日 (MC t͡ɕʰiuɪn ȵiɪt̚).

Compare Min Nan 春日 (chhun-ji̍t).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

春日 (hiragana しゅんじつ, rōmaji shunjitsu)

  1. the spring sun; a day in springtime
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Kanji in this term
はる
Grade: 2

Grade: 1
kun’yomi
Kanji in this term
はる
Grade: 2
ひ > び
Grade: 1
kun’yomi

From Old Japanese.

Compound of (haru, spring, springtime) +‎ (hi, sun, sunlight, daylight, day).

Sometimes pronounced with rendaku (連濁), as harubi.[2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

春日 (hiragana はるひ, rōmaji haruhi, alternative reading はるび, rōmaji harubi)

  1. (archaic) the spring sun; a day in springtime
    • c. 100507, Shūi Wakashū (book 1, poem 57)
      ちりぬべき (はな) () (とき)はすがのねのながきはる ()もみじかかりける
      chirinu beki hana miru toki wa suga no ne no nagaki haruhi mo mijikakarikeru
      (please add an English translation of this example)
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:春日.
CitationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:春日.

Proper nounEdit

春日 (hiragana はるひ, rōmaji Haruhi)

  1. a placename, especially within Kiyosu city in northwestern Aichi Prefecture
  2. a surname
  3. a female given name

Etymology 3Edit

 
Japanese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ja
 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
Kanji in this term
Grade: 2 Grade: 1
Irregular

From Old Japanese.

Compare 飛鳥 (Asuka).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Irregular reading)

Proper nounEdit

春日 (hiragana かすが, rōmaji Kasuga)

  1. a placename, especially:
    1. Short for 春日市 (Kasuga-shi): a city in Fukuoka Prefecture
    2. an ancient placename in the vicinity that is today part of city of Nara in Nara Prefecture; site of 春日大社 (Kasuga-taisha, Kasuga Grand Shrine)
  2. a surname
  3. a female given name
CitationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:春日.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Other various nanori readings.

Proper nounEdit

春日 (hiragana かすか, rōmaji Kasuka)

  1. a surname

春日 (hiragana かずか, rōmaji Kazuka)

  1. a placename

春日 (hiragana しゅんにち, rōmaji Shunnichi)

  1. a surname

春日 (hiragana はるか, rōmaji Haruka)

  1. a female given name
  2. a surname

春日 (hiragana はるま, rōmaji Haruma)

  1. a surname

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 2006, 大辞林 (Daijirin), Third Edition (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Sanseidō, →ISBN
  2. ^ 1995, 大辞泉 (Daijisen) (in Japanese), Tōkyō: Shogakukan, →ISBN

Old JapaneseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From (paru, spring, springtime) +‎ (pi1, sun, sunlight, daylight, day).

NounEdit

春日 (parupi1) (kana はるひ)

  1. the spring sun; a day in springtime
    • c. 759, Man'yōshū (book 5, poem 846), text here
      可須美多都那我岐波流卑乎可謝勢例杼伊野那都可子岐烏梅能波那可毛
      kasumi1 tatu nagaki1 parupi1 wo kazaseredo2 iya natukasiki1 ume2 no2 pana ka mo
      Through the long spring day, hazy with its rising mist, we keep our brows decked with blossoms of the plum, but only grow the fonder.[1]
    • c. 759, Man'yōshū (book 19, poem 4292), text here
      宇良宇良爾照流春日比婆理安我里情悲毛比登里志於母倍婆
      uraura ni tereru parupi1 ni pi1bari agari ko2ko2ro2 kanasi mo pi1to2ri si omope2ba
      Into the soft light of a tranquil day in spring a lark rises high―leaving my heart saddened as I muse on all alone.[2]
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:春日.
  2. a misty day (or sun) in spring, allusion to 春日 (Kasuga, a placename, see below)
CitationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:春日.

Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Japanese: 春日 (haruhi, harubi)

Etymology 2Edit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.
Particularly: “Kasu- cognate with 霞む (kasumu, grow hazy, be misty), -ga is either from (-ka, days) or (-ga, suffix indicating a place)?”

Compare 明日香 (Asuka), from pillow word 飛ぶ鳥の (to2bu to2ri no2).

Proper nounEdit

春日 (Kasuga) (kana かすが)

  1. a placename in the vicinity that is today part of the city of Nara in Nara Prefecture
    • c. 759, Man'yōshū (book 3, poem 407), text here
      千磐破神之社四無有世伐春日之野邊種益乎
      tipayaburu kami2 no2 yasiro2 si nakariseba Kasuga-no2-no1pe1 ni apa makamasi wo
      Thousand-rock-smashing, a fierce deity abides in the godly shrine: but for her I'd be well pleased to sow our millet in Kasuga fields.[3]
    • For more examples of usage of this term, see Citations:春日.
CitationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:春日.

Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Edwin A. Cranston (1998) The Gem-Glistening Cup, Stanford University Press, →ISBN, page 548
  2. ^ Steven D. Carter (1991) Traditional Japanese Poetry: An Anthology, illustrated edition, Stanford University Press, →ISBN, page 70
  3. ^ Minoru Sonoda (2013), “Shinto and the natural environment”, in John Breen, Mark Teeuwen, editors, Shinto in History: Ways of the Kami (Routledge Studies in Asian Religion), Routledge, →ISBN