Abinomn

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Noun

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bom

  1. earth

Afrikaans

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Etymology

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From Dutch bom, from French bombe.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /bɔm/
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

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bom (plural bomme, diminutive bommetjie)

  1. bomb, explosive
  2. (figurative) bombshell (something sensational, amazing or controversial)

Derived terms

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Danish

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Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

Etymology

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Borrowed from Middle Low German bōm (tree), from Proto-Germanic *baumaz, *bagmaz, compare German Baum and English beam.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bom c (singular definite bommen, plural indefinite bomme)

  1. bar, tollbar
  2. barrier (rail)
  3. beam
  4. boom

Inflection

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References

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bom” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from French bombe, still attested as bombe in Early Modern Dutch.

Noun

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bom f (plural bommen, diminutive bommetje n)

  1. bomb (explosive)
    Er werd een bom ontdekt in het treinstation.A bomb was discovered in the train station.
    De bommen vielen op de stad tijdens de luchtaanval.The bombs fell on the city during the air raid.
    Hij maakte een klein bommetje in het zwembad.He made a small splash in the pool. (figurative use)
  2. (Suriname) gas cylinder (cylindrical vessel for compressed gas)
    Synonyms: gasbom, gascylinder, gasfles
Derived terms
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Descendants
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  • Afrikaans: bom
  • Caribbean Javanese: bom
  • Indonesian: bom
  • Sranan Tongo: bom
  • West Frisian: bom

Etymology 2

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Clipping of bomschuit.

Noun

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bom f (plural bommen, diminutive bommetje n)

  1. (historical) flat-bottomed marine fishing vessel

Etymology 3

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From Middle Dutch bomme, bonne, probably of Celtic origin, from Gaulish *bunda, feminine form of *bundos (bottom), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰudʰ-, *bʰudʰmḗn.[1]

Noun

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bom f (plural bommen, diminutive bommetje n)

  1. (archaic) bung, stopper (for barrels)
    Synonyms: spon, stop

References

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  1. ^ bonde”, in Trésor de la langue française informatisé [Digitized Treasury of the French Language], 2012.

Iban

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English bom.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bom

  1. bomb

Indonesian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈbɔm]
  • Hyphenation: bom

Etymology 1

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From Dutch bom, from French bombe, from Italian bomba, from Latin bombus (a boom).

Noun

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bom (first-person possessive bomku, second-person possessive bommu, third-person possessive bomnya)

  1. bomb, an explosive device used or intended as a weapon.
Derived terms
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Compounds

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Etymology 2

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From Dutch boom (tree, pole), from Middle Dutch bôom, from Old Dutch bōm, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz.

Noun

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bom (first-person possessive bomku, second-person possessive bommu, third-person possessive bomnya)

  1. boom, tree, pole.

Etymology 3

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From Dutch slagboom (boom barrier, boom gate) or boom (beam, barrier). Compare to Dutch boomklok (A bell tolled during the opening (in the morning) or closing (in the evening) of a port, literally beam bell).

Noun

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bom (first-person possessive bomku, second-person possessive bommu, third-person possessive bomnya)

  1. boom barrier, boom gate
  2. (figuratively) harbor, harbour.
    Synonym: pelabuhan
  3. (figuratively) customs.
    Synonym: pabean
Alternative forms
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Further reading

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Lower Sorbian

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Etymology

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From Middle High German boum (German Baum), or East Central German, German Low German Boom.[1]

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bom m inan (diminutive bomk)

  1. tree
    • 2011 September 27, I. Neumannojc, “Sadowe bomy za derjeměśe luźa a natury”, in Nowy Casnik:
      Sadowe bomy w burskich gumnach a teke na dwórach su typiske za naš region.
      Fruit trees in farmers’ gardens and even in courtyards are typical for our region.

Declension

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References

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  1. ^ Lower Sorbian vocabulary. In: Haspelmath, M. & Tadmor, U. (eds.) World Loanword Database. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.

Further reading

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  • Muka, Arnošt (1921, 1928) “bom”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • Starosta, Manfred (1999) “bom”, in Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch (in German), Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag

Malay

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Malay Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ms

Etymology

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Ultimately from Ancient Greek βόμβος (bómbos).

Noun

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bom (Jawi spelling بوم, plural bom-bom, informal 1st possessive bomku, 2nd possessive bommu, 3rd possessive bomnya)

  1. bomb

Further reading

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Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology

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From either Middle Low German bōm, from Old Saxon bōm or from Dutch boom (tree, beam, mast, boom), from Middle Dutch bôom (tree, beam, pole, boom barrier), from Old Dutch bōm (tree), from Proto-West Germanic *baum (tree, beam), from Proto-Germanic *baumaz, *bagmaz (tree, beam, balk), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to grow, swell).

Noun

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bom m (definite singular bommen, indefinite plural bommer, definite plural bommene)

  1. a boom (for a sail, crane, microphone etc.)
  2. a barrier (at a railway crossing etc.)
  3. a beam (in gymnastics: balance beam)
  4. a derrick (nautical, for loading/unloading cargo)

Derived terms

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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology

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From Middle Low German bom.

Noun

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bom m (definite singular bommen, indefinite plural bommar, definite plural bommane)

  1. a boom (as above)
  2. a barrier (as above)
  3. a beam (as above)
  4. a derrick (nautical, for loading/unloading cargo)

References

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Occitan

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Etymology

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Imitative.

Interjection

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bom

  1. boom

Old Dutch

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *baum.

Noun

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bōm m

  1. tree

Inflection

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This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants

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Further reading

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  • bōm”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old Saxon

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Etymology

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From Proto-West Germanic *baum, from Proto-Germanic *baumaz.

Noun

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bōm m

  1. tree

Declension

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Descendants

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  • Middle Low German: bôm
    • German Low German: Boom
    • Plautdietsch: Boom
    • Danish: bom
    • Finnish: puomi
    • Gutnish: bom
    • Norwegian Bokmål: bom
    • Norwegian Nynorsk: bom
    • Swedish: bom

Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Dutch boom.[1][2]

Alternative forms

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Noun

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bom m inan

  1. boom (a gymnastics apparatus similar to a balance beam)
    Synonym: tram
  2. (sailing) boom (a spar extending the foot of a sail; a spar rigged outboard from a ship's side to which boats are secured in harbour)
  3. boom (a wishbone-shaped piece of windsurfing equipment)
Declension
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Etymology 2

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Onomatopoeic.

Interjection

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bom

  1. dong (sound of a bell, clock, etc.)

Etymology 3

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronoun

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bom

  1. Combined form of bo + -m

Further reading

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References

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  1. ^ Mirosław Bańko, Lidia Wiśniakowska (2021) “bom”, in Wielki słownik wyrazów obcych, →ISBN
  2. ^ Witold Doroszewski, editor (1958–1969), “bom”, in Słownik języka polskiego (in Polish), Warszawa: PWN

Portuguese

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old Galician-Portuguese bõo, inherited from Latin bonus (good), from Old Latin duonos, earlier duenos, from Proto-Italic *dwenos.

Compare Fala and Galician bo, Spanish bueno, French bon, Italian buono, and Romanian bun. Doublet of bónus, a later borrowing.

Pronunciation

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  • Rhymes:
  • Hyphenation: bom
  • Audio:(file)

Adjective

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bom (feminine boa, masculine plural bons, feminine plural boas, comparable, comparative melhor, superlative o melhor or ótimo or boníssimo)

  1. good
    1. desirable, positive, advantageous
    2. (in reference to senses) pleasant, enjoyable, (of food) tasty
      Esta brisa é boa.
      This breeze is pleasant.
      Synonyms: agradável, aprazível
    3. (of a person) kind, generous, acting morally
      Synonyms: gentil, generoso
      Ele é um homem bom.
      He is a good man.
    4. (of quantity or time) sizeable, reasonable, significant
      Synonyms: razoável, significante
      uma boa parte
      a significant part

Quotations

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For quotations using this term, see Citations:bom.

Antonyms

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(antonym(s) of all senses):

Interjection

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bom

  1. well, very well

Quotations

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For quotations using this term, see Citations:bom.

Derived terms

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  • bom dia
  • For terms derived from the feminine inflection, boa, see ==Derived terms== in boa.
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See also

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Slovene

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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bọ̑m

  1. first-person singular future of bíti

Swedish

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Etymology

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From Dutch boom.

Noun

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bom c

  1. a barrier (in the form of a pole that can be raised/lowered or opened/closed)
  2. a miss, failure to hit
  3. a boom (sail)
  4. a boom (type of balance beam, used in gymnastics)

Declension

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Declension of bom 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bom bommen bommar bommarna
Genitive boms bommens bommars bommarnas

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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References

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Tày

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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bom

  1. to encourage; to provoke
    bom đếch pin mạyto nudge the children into climbing trees
    bom cần tò fậtto encourage wrestling

References

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  • Lương Bèn (2011) Từ điển Tày-Việt [Tay-Vietnamese dictionary]‎[1][2] (in Vietnamese), Thái Nguyên: Nhà Xuất bản Đại học Thái Nguyên

Vietnamese

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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Borrowed from French bombe.

Noun

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(classifier quả, trái) bom

  1. bomb
    Synonym: trái phá (obsolete)

Etymology 2

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Borrowed from French pomme; the phoneme /p/ is changed into /ɓ/ as it is not a native onset consonant.

Noun

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(classifier quả, trái) bom

  1. (dialectal) apple
Synonyms
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Volapük

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English bone.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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bom (nominative plural boms)

  1. bone

Declension

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Derived terms

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References

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  • SARMENTO, Leila Lauar. Gramática em textos. 2nd edition. São Paulo, Brazil: Moderna, 2005.

Welsh

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Etymology

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Borrowed from English bomb.

Noun

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bom m or f (plural bomiau)

  1. bomb
  2. (slang) bomb, mint, killing (large amount of money)

Derived terms

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Mutation

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Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bom fom mom unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading

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  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “bom”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

Pronunciation

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Verb

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bom

  1. (transitive) to bind

References

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  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 81