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See also: BOM, BoM, bôm, bờm, and bơm

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AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch bom, from French bombe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bom (plural bomme, diminutive bommetjie)

  1. bomb, explosive
  2. (figuratively) bombshell (something sensational, amazing or controversial)

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

 
Danish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia da

NounEdit

bom c (singular definite bommen, plural indefinite bomme)

  1. bar, tollbar
  2. barrier (rail)
  3. beam
  4. boom

InflectionEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /bɔm/
  • Rhymes: -ɔm
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French bombe, still attested as bombe in Early Modern Dutch.

NounEdit

bom f, m (plural bommen, diminutive bommetje n)

  1. bomb (explosive)
  2. (Surinam) gas cylinder (cylindrical vessel for compressed gas)
    Synonyms: gascylinder, gasfles
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Afrikaans: bom
  • Indonesian: bom

Etymology 2Edit

Clipping of bomschuit.

NounEdit

bom f (plural bommen, diminutive bommetje n)

  1. (historical) flat-bottomed marine fishing vessel

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Dutch bomme, bonne.

NounEdit

bom f (plural bommen, diminutive bommetje n)

  1. (archaic) bung, stopper (for barrels)
    Synonyms: spon, stop

IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Dutch bom.

NounEdit

bom

  1. bomb

Lower SorbianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From German Baum, or specifically East Central German Boom.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bom m (diminutive bomk)

  1. tree
    • 2011 September 27, I. Neumannojc, "Sadowe bomy za derjeměśe luźa a natury", Nowy Casnik:
      Sadowe bomy w burskich gumnach a teke na dwórach su typiske za naš region.
      Fruit trees in farmers’ gardens and even in courtyards are typical for our region.

DeclensionEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German bom.

NounEdit

bom m (definite singular bommen, indefinite plural bommer, definite plural bommene)

  1. a boom (for a sail, crane, microphone etc.)
  2. a barrier (at a railway crossing etc.)
  3. a beam (in gymnastics: balance beam)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German bom.

NounEdit

bom m (definite singular bommen, indefinite plural bommar, definite plural bommane)

  1. a boom (as above)
  2. a barrier (as above)
  3. a beam (as above)

ReferencesEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *baumaz.

NounEdit

bōm m

  1. a tree

DeclensionEdit


DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Low German: bôm
    • German Low German: Boom
    • Plautdietsch: Boom
    • Danish: bom
    • Finnish: puomi
    • Gutnish: bom
    • Norwegian: bom
    • Swedish: bom

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese bõo, inherited from Latin bonus (good), from Old Latin duenos, later duonus, from Proto-Italic *dwenos, from Proto-Indo-European *dew- (to show favor, revere). Doublet of bónus, a later borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bom (feminine boa, masculine plural bons, feminine plural boas)

  1. good

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:bom.

AntonymsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bom

  1. well, very well

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:bom.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


SloveneEdit

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

bom c

  1. barrier (rail)
  2. miss, failure to hit
  3. boom (sail)

DeclensionEdit

Declension of bom 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative bom bommen bommar bommarna
Genitive boms bommens bommars bommarnas

SynonymsEdit


VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French bombe.

NounEdit

(classifier quả, trái) bom

  1. bomb

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from French pomme; the phoneme /p/ is changed into /ɓ/ as it is not a native onset consonant.

NounEdit

(classifier quả) bom

  1. (dialectal) apple
SynonymsEdit

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English bone.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bom (plural boms)

  1. bone

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • SARMENTO, Leila Lauar. Gramática em textos. 2nd edition. São Paulo, Brazil: Moderna, 2005.