EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Imitative.

Alternative formsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bo

  1. An exclamation used to startle or frighten.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.37:
      We may fairely cry bo-bo-boe; it may well make us hoarse, but it will nothing advaunce it.

Etymology 2Edit

Probably a shortening of boy.

NounEdit

bo

  1. (US, slang) Fellow, chap, boy.
    • 1940, Raymond Chandler, Farewell, My Lovely, Penguin 2010, p. 255:
      ‘Never heard of him,’ he smiled. ‘On your way, bo.’

Etymology 3Edit

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Wikipedia

From Japanese ( ぼう), from Middle Chinese (bǽwng "staff", "club") (compare Mandarin bàng).

NounEdit

bo (plural bos)

  1. (martial arts) A quarterstaff, especially in an oriental context.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old Provençal bon, from Latin bonus. Numerous cognates include French bon and Portuguese bom.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bo m (feminine bona, masculine plural bons, feminine plural bones)

  1. good

Usage notesEdit

The form bon is used as the masculine singular form when the adjective precedes the noun, and bo is used in all other cases.

See alsoEdit


CuibaEdit

NounEdit

bo

  1. home, house

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse , from búa (to reside).

NounEdit

bo n (singular definite boet, plural indefinite boer)

  1. estate (the property of a deceased person)
  2. den, nest
  3. abode, home
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse búa (to reside).

VerbEdit

bo (imperative bo, infinitive at bo, present tense bor, past tense boede, past participle har boet)

  1. live, reside, dwell
  2. stay, stop

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

Short for boterham.

NounEdit

bo m (plural bo's, diminutive boke n)

  1. (Flemish) sandwich

EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

bo (plural bo-oj, accusative singular bo-on, accusative plural bo-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter B/b.

See alsoEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin bonus.

AdjectiveEdit

bo m (feminine boa, masculine plural bos, feminine plural boas)

  1. good

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

InterjectionEdit

bo

  1. An interjection expressing doubt or indecision.
    • Viene Filomena stasera? Bo, non m’ha richiamato.
      • Is Filomena coming tonight? I don’t know, she never called me back.

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

bo

  1. rōmaji reading of
  2. rōmaji reading of

LojbanEdit

CmavoEdit

bo (rafsi bor)

  1. Closest scope grouping operator; groups surrounding words within compound words (tanru); that is, it strengthens the association between immediately neighboring words.
    le xunre kerfa bo smani
    the haired monkey who is red
    compare to:
    • le xunre kerfa smani
      • the monkey who has red hair
  2. Can be used as terminator to end a string of time tense indicating cmavo (at the beginning of a sentence).
    .ibazabo la lojban. cu pu co'a zmadu la loglan. leka vajni [1]
    After some time, Lojban began to exceed Loglan in terms of importance.

Usage notesEdit

  • Consecutive uses of bo cause their neighboring brivla (in a tanru) to behave right-associatively.[1]
  • An equivalent construction can be achieved using a surrounding/circumfix ke ... ke'e pair (replacing the infix bo).

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Lojban Reference Grammar, Chapter 5, §4

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

bo (Zhuyin ㄅㄛ˙)

  1. Pinyin reading of
  2. Pinyin reading of
  3. Nonstandard spelling of .
  4. Nonstandard spelling of .
  5. Nonstandard spelling of .
  6. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Low German behof (compare behov)

NounEdit

bo (idiomatic use only)

  1. (usually with ha) a need
    Jeg har bo for en hammer.
    I could use a hammer.
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
Usage notesEdit

A noun not commonly used.

Etymology 2Edit

From Danish bo, from Old Norse , "settled area, town" (compare alternative form bu). Akin to bod, "store room, booth" and the verb bo, "to live".

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

bo n (definite singular boet; indefinite plural bo; definite plural boa/boene)

  1. one's home (mainly idiomatic)
    De giftet seg og satte bo.
    They married and settled down/build their home.
  2. estate
    Å skifte et bo.
    To divide an estate.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
  • dødsbo
  • konkursbo
  • sette bo
  • skifte et bo
  • uskiftet bo
  • sitte i uskiftet bo
  • ta et bo under behandling

Etymology 3Edit

From Danish bo, from Old Norse búa, "to prepare, finish, make preparations, equip", cognate with Old English būan, Old Frisian buwa, Old Saxon būan and Old High German būan (> German bauen).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

bo (present tense bor; past tense bodde; past participle bodd)

  1. to live (have permanent residence), to stay
    Hvor bor du (hen)?
    Where do you live?
    Jeg vet hvor du bor.
    I know where you live.
    Hvor lenge blir du boende.
    How long will you be staying?
  2. to be, to dwell, to be in
    Husk at all skjønnhet på jord bor i de evige ord: Jeg elsker deg. (Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson)
    Remember that all beauty on Earth dwells in those eternal words: I love you.
    Du aner ikke hva som virkelig bor i henne.
    You have no idea what she's really like. (literally: "you have no idea what really dwells in her")
SynonymsEdit
  • (to live, have residence) holde hus (holde til huse), holde til husere, kampere, leve, losjere, oppholde seg, residere, tilbringe
  • (dwell in, be in) finnes, rommes, skjule seg, være, være til stede
Derived termsEdit
  • boende
  • bo sammen
  • bo seg i hjel
  • bygge og bo
  • hva som bor i
See alsoEdit
  • bu (alternative form and Nynorsk form)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German behof (compare behov)

NounEdit

bo (idiomatic use only)

  1. (usually with ha) a need
    Eg har bo for ein hammar.
    I could use a hammer.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

A noun not commonly used.

ReferencesEdit

  • “blomst” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

bo ?

  1. (East dialect) dwelling

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

bo

  1. because
  2. or (else)
    Wstawaj już, bo spóźnisz się do szkoły!
    Get up now or you'll be late at school!

SloveneEdit

VerbEdit

bo

  1. third-person singular future form of biti.

SwedishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse búa, from Proto-Germanic *būaną.

VerbEdit

bo

  1. live; dwell; to have permanent residence
    Jag vill bo i en stor stad.
    I want to live in a big city.
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

bo n

  1. nest; the place where certain animals live, in particular birds.
    fågelbo
    bird’s nest
  2. a home (the inventory that turns a place into a home)
  3. c (only in compounds) a person living in given city (e.g. Londonbo) or way (sambo, särbo)
DeclensionEdit

Alternative form for the definite singular: bot/bots.

Related termsEdit
See alsoEdit

VenetianEdit

NounEdit

bo m (invariable)

  1. ox

VietnameseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French tip, extra money given in appreciation for a rendered service

PronunciationEdit

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): /ˀɓɔ˧˧/
  • (Huế) IPA(key): /ˀɓɔ˧˧/
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): /ˀɓɔ˧˥/

NounEdit

bo

  1. (money) tip, extra money given in appreciation for a rendered service

SynonymsEdit


WelshEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • byddo

VerbEdit

bo

  1. (literary) third-person singular present subjunctive of bod

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bo fo mo unchanged

ZuluEdit

PronounEdit

-bo

  1. Combining stem of bona.

See alsoEdit

Last modified on 7 April 2014, at 07:06