Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: RAG, rág, räg, and råg

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English ragge, from Old English *ragg (suggested by derivative raggiġ (shaggy; bristly; ragged)), from Old Norse rǫgg (tuft; shagginess). Cognate with Swedish ragg. Related to rug.

NounEdit

rag (plural rags)

  1. (in the plural) Tattered clothes.
    • 1684, John Dryden, Miscellany Poems: Containing a New Translation of Virgills Eclogues, Ovid's Love Elegies, Odes of Horace and Other Authors, The twenty-ninth ode of the first book of Horace:
      And virtue, though in rags, will keep me warm.
  2. A piece of old cloth; a tattered piece of cloth; a shred, a tatter.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book III, lines 490-491:
      Cowls, hoods, and habits, with their wearers, toss'd, / And flutter'd into rags; then reliques, beads,
    • 1655, Thomas Fuller, The Church-history of Britain from the Birth of Jesus Christ until the year MDCXLVIII[1], page 399:
      [] even by the law of their own might and malice, not having otherwise any rag of legality to cover the shame of their cruelty.
  3. A shabby, beggarly fellow; a ragamuffin.
  4. A ragged edge in metalworking.
  5. (nautical, slang) A sail, or any piece of canvas.
    • 1864, James Russell Lowell, My Garden Acquaintance; A Good Word for Winter; A Moosehead Journal, page 83:
      Our ship was a clipper, with every rag set, stunsails, sky-scrapers, and all
  6. (slang, pejorative) A newspaper, magazine.
  7. (poker) A poor, low-ranking kicker.[1]
    I have ace-four on my hand. In other words, I have ace-rag.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

rag (third-person singular simple present rags, present participle ragging, simple past and past participle ragged)

  1. (intransitive) To become tattered.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for rag in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Etymology 2Edit

Unknown origin; perhaps the same word as Etymology 1, above.

NounEdit

rag (plural rags)

  1. A coarse kind of rock, somewhat cellular in texture; ragstone.
    • 2003, Peter Ackroyd, The Clerkenwell Tales, page 1:
      the three walls around the garden, each one of thirty-three feet, were built out of three layers of stone — pebble stone, flint and rag stone.

VerbEdit

rag (third-person singular simple present rags, present participle ragging, simple past and past participle ragged)

  1. To break (ore) into lumps for sorting.
  2. To cut or dress roughly, as a grindstone.

Etymology 3Edit

Origin uncertain.

VerbEdit

rag (third-person singular simple present rags, present participle ragging, simple past and past participle ragged)

  1. To scold or rail at; to rate; to tease; to torment; to banter.
  2. (Britain slang) To drive a car or another vehicle in a hard, fast or unsympathetic manner.
  3. To tease or torment, especially at a university; to bully, to haze.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

rag (plural rags)

  1. (dated) A prank or practical joke.
  2. (Britain, Ireland) A society run by university students for the purpose of charitable fundraising.

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Perhaps from ragged. Compare later ragtime.

NounEdit

rag (plural rags)

  1. (obsolete, US) An informal dance party featuring music played by African-American string bands. [19th c.]
  2. A ragtime song, dance or piece of music. [from 19th c.]
  3. (music, obsolete) To add syncopation (to a tune) and thereby make it appropriate for a ragtime song.[2]
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

rag (third-person singular simple present rags, present participle ragging, simple past and past participle ragged)

  1. (transitive, informal) To play or compose (a piece, melody, etc.) in syncopated time.
  2. (intransitive, informal) To dance to ragtime music.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. ISBN 978-1880069523
  2. ^ 2001. The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music: North America. Garland Publishing. Ellen Koskoff (Ed.). Pg. 651.

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

PrepositionEdit

rag

  1. before

DutchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Unknown, only found to related to West Frisian reach, though possibly more distantly to Old Saxon raginna (rough hair), Old English ragu (moss).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rag n (plural raggen, diminutive ragje n)

  1. spider silk
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From English rag.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

rag n (plural rags, diminutive ragje n)

  1. A piece of ragtime music.

GermanEdit

VerbEdit

rag

  1. Imperative singular of ragen.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of ragen.

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Back-formation from ragad. Created during the Hungarian language reform which took place in the 18th–19th centuries.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɒɡ]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: rag

NounEdit

rag (plural ragok)

  1. (grammar) suffix, affix, case ending

DeclensionEdit

Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative rag ragok
accusative ragot ragokat
dative ragnak ragoknak
instrumental raggal ragokkal
causal-final ragért ragokért
translative raggá ragokká
terminative ragig ragokig
essive-formal ragként ragokként
essive-modal
inessive ragban ragokban
superessive ragon ragokon
adessive ragnál ragoknál
illative ragba ragokba
sublative ragra ragokra
allative raghoz ragokhoz
elative ragból ragokból
delative ragról ragokról
ablative ragtól ragoktól
Possessive forms of rag
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. ragom ragjaim
2nd person sing. ragod ragjaid
3rd person sing. ragja ragjai
1st person plural ragunk ragjaink
2nd person plural ragotok ragjaitok
3rd person plural ragjuk ragjaik

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit


LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

rag

  1. rafsi of rango.

North FrisianEdit

NounEdit

rag m (plural rager)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) (anatomy) back

Scottish GaelicEdit

SomaliEdit

NounEdit

rag ?

  1. man