See also: Bass and Baß

EnglishEdit

 Bass (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

Etymology 1Edit

A respelling of base under the influence of Italian basso (low).

Alternative formsEdit

  • (noun): base (dated)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bass (comparative basser, superlative bassest)

  1. Of sound, a voice or an instrument, low in pitch or frequency.
    The giant spoke in a deep, bass, rumbling voice that shook me to my boots.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

bass (plural basses)

Examples (a bass voice singing a soprano part)
(file)
 
body of a bass guitar [4]
  1. A low spectrum of sound tones.
    Peter adjusted the equalizer on his audio equipment to emphasize the bass.
  2. A section of musical group that produces low-pitched sound, lower than the baritone and tenor.
    The conductor preferred to situate the bass in the middle rear, rather than to one side of the orchestra.
  3. One who sings in the bass range.
    Halfway through middle school, Edgar morphed from a soprano to a bass, much to the amazement and amusement of his fellow choristers.
  4. (music) An instrument that plays in the bass range, in particular a double bass, bass guitar, electric bass or bass synthesiser.
    The musician swung the bass over his head like an axe and smashed it into the amplifier, creating a discordant howl of noise.
  5. The clef sign that indicates that the pitch of the notes is below middle C; a bass clef.
    The score had been written without the treble and bass, but it was easy to pick out which was which based on the location of the notes on the staff.
SynonymsEdit
Coordinate termsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bass (third-person singular simple present basses, present participle bassing, simple past and past participle bassed)

  1. To sound in a deep tone.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English bace, bas, alteration of bars, from Old English bærs (a fish, perch), from Proto-West Germanic *bars, from Proto-Germanic *barsaz (perch, literally prickly), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰórsos (prickle, thorn, scale). Cognate with Dutch baars (perch, bass), German Barsch (perch). More at barse.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bass (countable and uncountable, plural basses or bass)

  1. The perch; any of various marine and freshwater fish resembling the perch, all within the order of Perciformes.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

A corruption of bast.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bass (countable and uncountable, plural basses)

  1. The fibrous inner bark of the linden or lime tree, used for making mats.
  2. Fibers from other plants, especially palm trees
  3. Anything made from such fibers, such as a hassock, basket or thick mat.
    • [1865, William Stott Banks, A List of Provincial Words in use at Wakefield in Yorkshire, Wakefield: J.R.Smith, page 6:
      BASS, 1, a door mat]
    • 1982 [1980], J L Carr, A Month in the Country, Harmondsworth, Middlesex: Penguin Books/Harvester Press, →ISBN, page 2:
      I set off half-heartedly, as best I could sheltering my spare clothes (which were in the straw fish-bass) under my coat. […] The rain made a channel from my trilby down my neck and one handle of the fish-bass gave way.
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CimbrianEdit

NounEdit

bass n (plural bèssardiminutive bèssle)

  1. (Mezzaselva) Alternative form of vass

DeclensionEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Former comparative of wohl.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bass (strong nominative masculine singular basser, not comparable)

  1. greatly

Usage notesEdit

This primarily used in the collocations bass erstaunt/basses Erstaunen.

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • bass” in Duden online
  • bass” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

LatvianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Italian basso.

NounEdit

bass m (1st declension)

  1. bass

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Balto-Slavic *basás, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰosós. Cognate with Lithuanian basas, Russian босо́й (bosój), English bare.

AdjectiveEdit

bass (definite basais, comparative basāks, superlative visbasākais, adverb basi)

  1. bare, unshod (of feet: without shoes, socks or other coverings)
    staigāt basām kājāmto walk barefoot, to walk with bare feet
DeclensionEdit
SynonymsEdit

LombardEdit

EtymologyEdit

Akin to Italian basso, from Late Latin bassus.

AdjectiveEdit

bass

  1. low

LuxembourgishEdit

VerbEdit

bass

  1. second-person singular present indicative of sinn

MalteseEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Root
b-s-s
2 terms

Inherited from dialectal Arabic; compare Tunisian Arabic بص(baṣṣ, to fart).

VerbEdit

bass (imperfect jboss)

  1. to fart
ConjugationEdit
    Conjugation of bass
singular plural
1st person 2nd person 3rd person 1st person 2nd person 3rd person
perfect m bassejt bassejt bass bassejna bassejtu bassew
f basset
imperfect m nboss tboss jboss nbossu tbossu jbossu
f tboss
imperative boss bossu

Etymology 2Edit

From English bus.

NounEdit

bass m (plural basis)

  1. bus

Middle EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

bass

  1. Alternative form of bas

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin bassus, via Italian basso.

NounEdit

bass m (definite singular bassen, indefinite plural basser, definite plural bassene)

  1. (music) bass; (musical range, person, instrument or group performing in the base range)
  2. (music) short for bassgitar (bass guitar) or kontrabass (double bass)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin bassus, via Italian basso.

NounEdit

bass m (definite singular bassen, indefinite plural bassar, definite plural bassane)

  1. (music) bass; (musical range, person, instrument or group performing in the base range)
  2. (music) short for bassgitar (bass guitar) or kontrabass (double bass)

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin bassus.

AdjectiveEdit

bass m (f bassa, m pl bass, f pl bassas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) deep, low