English edit

 
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Wikipedia

Etymology edit

From Middle English lunge, longe, from Old English lungen, from Proto-Germanic *lunganjō, an enlargement of *lungô (the light organ, lung), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁lengʷʰ-, whence ultimately also light. Cognate with West Frisian long, Dutch long, German Lunge, Danish lunge, Norwegian lunge, Swedish lunga, Icelandic lunga, and also Russian лёгкое (ljóxkoje) (lung), Ancient Greek ἐλαφρός (elaphrós, light in weight) and perhaps Albanian lungë (blister, bulge). Compare Latin levis and Old English lēoht (Modern English light). See also lights (lungs). Superseded non-native Middle English pomoun (lung), borrowed from Old French poumon, pomon (lung).

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: lŭng, IPA(key): /ˈlʌŋ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋ

Noun edit

lung (plural lungs)

  1. (anatomy) A biological organ of vertebrates that controls breathing and oxygenates the blood.
    • 1913, Joseph C[rosby] Lincoln, chapter VII, in Mr. Pratt’s Patients, New York, N.Y., London: D[aniel] Appleton and Company, →OCLC:
      I made a speaking trumpet of my hands and commenced to whoop “Ahoy!” and “Hello!” at the top of my lungs. [] The Colonel woke up, and, after asking what in brimstone was the matter, opened his mouth and roared “Hi!” and “Hello!” like the bull of Bashan.
  2. (in the plural) Capacity for exercise or exertion; breath.
    He no longer has the lungs to play long rallies like he used to.
  3. That which supplies oxygen or fresh air, such as trees, parklands, forest, etc., to a place.
    • 1898, H.G. Wells, The War of the Worlds, London: William Heinemann, page 123:
      Afterwards he found that the vague feeling of alarm had spread to the clients of the underground railway, and that the Sunday excursionists began to return from all the South-Western "lungs" - Barnes, Wimbledon, Richmond Park, Kew, and so forth - at unnaturally early hours[.]

Synonyms edit

  • (organ): (in the plural) bellows (informal or archaic), (in the plural) lights (of an animal, used as food)

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Aromanian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin longus. Compare Romanian lung.

Adjective edit

lung m (feminine lunghe, masculine plural lundz, feminine plural lundzi)

  1. long

Related terms edit

See also edit

Drung edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Sino-Tibetan *luŋ.

Noun edit

lung

  1. stone

References edit

Ross Perlin (2019) A Grammar of Trung[1], Santa Barbara: University of California

Indonesian edit

 
Indonesian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia id

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [ˈlʊŋ]
  • Hyphenation: lung

Etymology 1 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.).

Noun edit

lung (first-person possessive lungku, second-person possessive lungmu, third-person possessive lungnya)

  1. curve, bend.
    Synonym: keluk
  2. archer's bow.
    Synonym: busur

Etymology 2 edit

Inherited from Malay [Term?], from Hokkien [Term?] (láng, lâng, lông, lóng, “bamboo container”).

Noun edit

lung (first-person possessive lungku, second-person possessive lungmu, third-person possessive lungnya)

  1. bottomless coffin.

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

lung (first-person possessive lungku, second-person possessive lungmu, third-person possessive lungnya)

  1. alternative spelling of long (large firecracker).

Further reading edit

Lashi edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

lung

  1. to force someone to put (something inside something)

References edit

  • Hkaw Luk (2017) A grammatical sketch of Lacid[2], Chiang Mai: Payap University (master thesis)

Old French edit

Adjective edit

lung m (oblique and nominative feminine singular lunge)

  1. (Anglo-Norman) Alternative form of long

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

From the Latin longus (long, adjective), from Proto-Indo-European *dl̥h₁gʰós (long).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

lung m or n (feminine singular lungă, plural lungi)

  1. long
    Antonym: scurt
    Asta e o stradă foarte lungă!
    This is a really long street!

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Romani: lùngo

See also edit

Romansch edit

Etymology edit

From Latin longus.

Adjective edit

lung m (feminine singular lunga, masculine plural lungs, feminine plural lungas)

  1. long

Vietnamese edit

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

lung (𢥆)

  1. (of thought) very hard

Adjective edit

lung

  1. (only in compounds) loose

Derived terms edit

Derived terms