See also: Peel

English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Middle English pelen, from Old English pilian and Old French peler, pellier; both from Latin pilō, pilāre (to remove hair from, depilate), from pilus (hair). Doublet of pill.

Verb

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peel (third-person singular simple present peels, present participle peeling, simple past and past participle peeled)

  1. (transitive) To remove the skin or outer covering of.
    I sat by my sister's bed, peeling oranges for her.
  2. (transitive) To remove something from the outer or top layer of.
    I peeled (the skin from) a banana and ate it hungrily.
    We peeled the old wallpaper off in strips where it was hanging loose.
  3. (intransitive) To become detached, come away, especially in flakes or strips; to shed skin in such a way.
    I had been out in the sun too long, and my nose was starting to peel.
  4. (intransitive) To remove one's clothing.
    The children peeled by the side of the lake and jumped in.
  5. (intransitive) To move, separate (off or away).
    The scrum-half peeled off and made for the touchlines.
Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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Noun

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peel (countable and uncountable, plural peels)

  1. (usually uncountable) The skin or outer layer of a fruit, vegetable, etc.
  2. (countable, rugby) The action of peeling away from a formation.
  3. (countable) A cosmetic preparation designed to remove dead skin or to exfoliate.
 
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Synonyms
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Derived terms
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Translations
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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2

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From Middle English peel, pele, from Anglo-Norman pel (compare modern French pieu), from Latin pālus (stake). Doublet of pole and pale.

Noun

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peel (plural peels)

  1. (obsolete) A stake.
  2. (obsolete) A fence made of stakes; a stockade.
  3. (archaic) A small tower, fort, or castle; a keep.
Derived terms
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Etymology 3

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From Middle English pele, from Old French pele (modern French pelle), from Latin pāla, from the base of plangō (fix, plant). Doublet of pala.

Noun

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peel (plural peels)

  1. A shovel or similar instrument, now especially a pole with a flat disc at the end used for removing pizza or loaves of bread from a baker's oven.
  2. A T-shaped implement used by printers and bookbinders for hanging wet sheets of paper on lines or poles to dry.
  3. (archaic, US) The blade of an oar.
Translations
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Etymology 4

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Unknown.

Noun

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peel (plural peels)

  1. (Scotland, curling) An equal or match; a draw.
  2. (curling) A takeout which removes a stone from play as well as the delivered stone.

Verb

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peel (third-person singular simple present peels, present participle peeling, simple past and past participle peeled)

  1. (curling) To play a peel shot.

Etymology 5

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Named from Walter H. Peel, a noted 19th-century croquet player.

Verb

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peel (third-person singular simple present peels, present participle peeling, simple past and past participle peeled)

  1. (croquet) To send through a hoop (of a ball other than one's own).

Etymology 6

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Old French piller (pillage).

Verb

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peel (third-person singular simple present peels, present participle peeling, simple past and past participle peeled)

  1. (archaic, transitive) To plunder; to pillage, rob.

Etymology 7

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Noun

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peel (plural peels)

  1. Alternative form of peal (a small or young salmon)

Etymology 8

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Verb

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peel

  1. Misspelling of peal: to sound loudly.
    • 1825 June 25, "My Village Bells", in The Circulator of Useful Knowledge, Literature, Amusement, and General Information number XXVI, available in, 1825, The Circulator of Useful Amusement, Literature, Science, and General Information, page 401,
      Oh ! still for me let merry bells peel out their holy chime;
    • 1901 January 1, "Twentieth Century's Triumphant Entry", The New York Times, page 1,
      The lights flashed, the crowds sang,... bells peeled, bombs thundered,... and the new Century made its triumphant entry.
    • 2006, Miles Richardson, Being-In-Christ and Putting Death in Its Place, Louisiana State University Press, →ISBN, pages 230–231:
      As the tiny Virgin... approaches one of the barrio churches, bells peel vigorously, a brass band launches into a fast-paced tune, and large rockets zoom... .

Anagrams

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Wolof

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Noun

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peel

  1. shovel

Yola

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Etymology

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From Middle English pele, from Old French pele, from Latin pāla.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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peel

  1. A wooden implement like a shovel for putting loaves of bread in the oven.

References

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  • Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, page 135