Translingual edit

Symbol edit

fo

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Faroese.

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1 edit

Clipping of folio

Noun edit

fo (plural fos)

  1. (paper, printing) Abbreviation of folio., page and book size (10"-12.5" x 15"-20").
Synonyms edit
  • (page and book size): f
  • (book size): F

Etymology 2 edit

Preposition edit

fo

  1. (informal) Alternative spelling of fo'

Anagrams edit

Asaro'o edit

Noun edit

fo

  1. (Molet Kasu, Molet Mur) water

Alternative forms edit

  • po (Asaro'o)

References edit

Beneraf edit

Noun edit

fo

  1. water

Further reading edit

Berik edit

Noun edit

fo

  1. water

Further reading edit

Bislama edit

Bislama cardinal numbers
 <  3 4 5  > 
    Cardinal : fo

Etymology edit

From English four.

Numeral edit

fo

  1. four

Cameroon Pidgin edit

Preposition edit

fo

  1. Alternative spelling of for

Chinese edit

Etymology 1 edit

Borrowed from English follow.

Pronunciation edit


Verb edit

fo

  1. (Internet, Internet slang) to follow (subscribe to see content from an account on a social media platform)
Synonyms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From clipping of English focus.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fo (Hong Kong Cantonese)

  1. Alternative form of foc.

Verb edit

fo (Hong Kong Cantonese)

  1. Alternative form of foc.

Etymology 3 edit

From clipping of English follow.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fo (Hong Kong Cantonese)

  1. (Internet slang) Alternative form of fol.

Dineor edit

Noun edit

fo

  1. water

Further reading edit

Esperanto edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

fo (accusative singular fo-on, plural fo-oj, accusative plural fo-ojn)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter F.

See also edit

Ewe edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fo

  1. brother (older brother)
  2. cousin (older male cousin)

Verb edit

fo

  1. to peel (remove skin)

Fanagalo edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English four.

Numeral edit

fo

  1. four

Italian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fo

  1. (literary or regional) first-person singular present indicative of fare
    Synonym: faccio

Usage notes edit

fo is an alternative form (with respect to faccio) for the present indicative of the first person. Its usage is mainly literary and archaic[1] but is still used in some regional forms of Italian.

References edit

Itik edit

Noun edit

fo

  1. water

Further reading edit

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

fo

  1. Rōmaji transcription of ふぉ
  2. Rōmaji transcription of フォ

Malagasy edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *pusuq, cognate of Javanese pusuh and Tagalog puso.

Noun edit

fo

  1. (anatomy) heart

Further reading edit

  • fo in Malagasy dictionaries at malagasyword.org

Mambwe-Lungu edit

Noun edit

fo

  1. water

Further reading edit

Mandarin edit

Romanization edit

fo

  1. Nonstandard spelling of .
  2. Nonstandard spelling of .

Usage notes edit

  • Transcriptions of Mandarin into the Latin script often do not distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without indication of tone.

Manx edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish fo, from Proto-Celtic *uɸo, from Proto-Indo-European *upo (under, up from under).

Preposition edit

fo

  1. under
  2. below

Inflection edit

Singular Plural
Person 1st 2nd 3rd m. 3rd f. 1st 2nd 3rd
Normal foym foyd fo foee foin feue foue
Emphatic foyms foyds fosyn foeeish foinyn feueish fouesyn

Pronoun edit

fo

  1. third-person singular masculine of fo
    under him/it

Derived terms edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

From the oblique stem of Old English ġefāh; equivalent to y- +‎ fo (adjective), ultimately from Proto-West Germanic *faih.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fo (plural fon or fos)

  1. A foe, enemy or opponent:
    1. An enemy of the true religion.
    2. An enemy combatant or armed force.
    3. (Christianity) Satan; the enemy of mankind.
  2. A harmful or ruinous force; that which causes terror.
Descendants edit
  • English: foe
  • Scots: fae
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old English , a form of fāh, from Proto-West Germanic *faih, from Proto-Germanic *faihaz.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fo

  1. (rare) combative, opposed, inimical
  2. (rare) dangerous, foreboding
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • English: foe (obsolete as an adjective)
References edit

Adverb edit

fo

  1. (rare) In a way showing unfriendliness or opposition.
Descendants edit
  • English: foe (obsolete as an adverb)
References edit

Murui Huitoto edit

Adverb edit

fo

  1. Alternative spelling of foo

References edit

  • Shirley Burtch (1983) Diccionario Huitoto Murui (Tomo I) (Linguistica Peruana No. 20)‎[1] (in Spanish), Yarinacocha, Peru: Instituto Lingüístico de Verano, page 91

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French fol, from Latin follis.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Noun edit

fo m (plural fos)

  1. (Jersey) madman

Nupe edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

fo

  1. (transitive) to wash
    Synonym:
    Ǹdá á èwò fo.Father washed the garment.

Old Irish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Celtic *uɸo, from Proto-Indo-European *upo (under, up from under).

Preposition edit

fo (with accusative or dative)

  1. under, beneath
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 109d5
      Ní taít Día fo tairṅgere conid·chumscaiged.
      God does not come under a promise that he should alter it.
  2. to, towards
    • c. 850-875, Turin Glosses and Scholia on St Mark, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 484–94, Tur. 110c
      Ba bés leusom do·bertis dá boc leu dochum tempuil, ⁊ no·léicthe indala n‑aí fon díthrub co pecad in popuil, ⁊ do·bertis maldachta foir, ⁊ n⟨o⟩·oircthe didiu and ó popul tar cenn a pecthae ind aile.
      It was a custom with them that two he-goats were brought by them to the temple, and one of the two of them was let go to the wilderness with the sin of the people, and curses were put upon him, and thereupon the other was slain there by the people for their sins.
  3. through, throughout
  4. in the capacity of
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 20b13
      indidit a·tá irascemini sunt .i. irascemini fercaigthe-si, acht is fo imchomarc a·tá.
      It is not in affirmation that irascemini is here, i.e. irascemini you pl are angry, but it is in interrogation. [In other words, irascemini is here a question, not a statement. The Latin verb is actually in the future tense, but the Old Irish gloss of it is in the present tense.]
  5. according to
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 38c3
      Ní hé apstal cita·rogab in testimin so. Aliter: Ní fóu da·uc int apstal fon chéill fuand·rogab in fáith.
      It is not (the) apostle who first uttered this text. Otherwise: The apostle did not apply it in the sense in which the prophet uttered it.

Inflection edit

*Late forms

Combinations with a definite article:

  • fon, fun (under the (accusative m/f sg))
  • fua (under the (accusative n sg))
  • fon(d), fun(d) (under the (dative sg))
  • fonna (under the (accusative pl))

Combinations with a possessive determiner:

  • fom (under my)
  • fot (under your sg)
  • foa, fua, (under his/her/its/their)
  • fóar (under our)

Combinations with a relative pronoun:

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Irish: faoi
  • Manx: fo
  • Scottish Gaelic: fo

Further reading edit

Scottish Gaelic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Irish fo. Cognates include Irish faoi and Manx fo.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /fɔ/
  • Hyphenation: fo

Preposition edit

fo (+ dative, triggers lenition, combined with the singular definite article fon)

  1. under, below, beneath
  2. under the influence of

Inflection edit

Personal inflection of fo
Number Person Simple Emphatic
Singular 1st fodham fodhamsa
2nd fodhad fodhadsa
3rd m fodha fodhasan
3rd f fòidhpe fòidhpese
Plural 1st fodhainn fodhainne
2nd fodhaibh fodhaibhse
3rd fòdhpa fòdhpasan

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Colin Mark (2003), “fo”, in The Gaelic-English dictionary, London: Routledge, →ISBN, page 307

Sranan Tongo edit

Etymology edit

From English four.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

fo

  1. four

Venetian edit

Verb edit

fo

  1. first-person singular present indicative of far

Volapük edit

Preposition edit

fo

  1. in front of; before (place)

Antonyms edit

Welsh edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Reduction of efô, emphatic form of ef (he (literary)).

Pronoun edit

fo

  1. he, him.
Usage notes edit

Fo is used in north Wales and a variant of o. The choice between o and fo is dependent on grammatical and euphonic considerations. The forms e and fe are used in the south.

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

fo

  1. Soft mutation of bo.

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
bo fo mo unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Yola edit

Pronoun edit

fo

  1. Alternative form of fho
    • 1867, CONGRATULATORY ADDRESS IN THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY, page 114, lines 12-14[1]:
      az avare ye trad dicke londe yer name waz ee-kent var ee vriene o' livertie, an He fo brake ye neckarès o' zlaves.
      for before your foot pressed the soil, your name was known to us as the friend of liberty, and he who broke the fetters of the slave.
    • 1927, “LAMENT OF A WIDOW”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 130, lines 1[2]:
      Ochone! to fo shul Ich maak mee moan,
      Ochone, to whom shall I make my moan,
    • 1927, “ZONG O DHREE YOLA MYTHENS”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 131, lines 2[2]:
      Fo naar had looke var to be brides,
      Who never had luck to be brides,
    • 1927, “PAUDEEN FOUGHLAAN'S WEDDEEN”, in THE ANCIENT DIALECT OF THE BARONIES OF FORTH AND BARGY, COUNTY WEXFORD, page 133, lines 2[2]:
      Fo laately got tackled to Kakeen Lurkaan,
      Who lately got tackled to Catherine Larkin,

References edit

  1. ^ Jacob Poole (d. 1827) (before 1828), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, published 1867
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Kathleen A. Browne (1927) The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland Sixth Series, Vol.17 No.2, Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland

Yoruba edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (intransitive) to jump, or leap in an upwards direction
  2. (intransitive) to fly
  3. (idiomatic) to miss, to escape one's attention, to forget
    ọkàn mí óMy mind missed it
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to decapitate
    Synonyms: bẹ́, bẹ́rí, bẹ́lórí
    wọ́n fi idà fo orí olèThey used a sword to decapitate the head of the thief
Derived terms edit
  • ìfò (decapitation)
  • afò (executioner)

Etymology 3 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to omit
    Synonym: yọ
  2. (intransitive) to become omitted
Derived terms edit

Etymology 4 edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

  1. (transitive) to shrink (as of clothes)
  2. (intransitive) to become shortened in dimension; to contract; to no longer be able to fit
    aṣọ yìí The clothes no longer fits me
Derived terms edit
  • ìfò (the act of shrinking; contraction)