◌́

(Redirected from ́)
See also: ´ [U+00B4 ACUTE ACCENT], ˊ [U+02CA MODIFIER LETTER ACUTE ACCENT], ʹ [U+02B9 MODIFIER LETTER PRIME], and ̋ [U+030B COMBINING DOUBLE ACUTE ACCENT]

◌́ U+0301, ́
COMBINING ACUTE ACCENT
◌̀
[U+0300]
Combining Diacritical Marks ◌̂
[U+0302]
◌́ U+0341, ́
COMBINING ACUTE TONE MARK
◌̀
[U+0340]
Combining Diacritical Marks ◌͂
[U+0342]

Translingual edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. (IPA) a high tone.
  2. (IPA, obsolete) a rising tone, or, in contrast to low ◌̗, a high rising tone.
  3. (Lithuanian dialectology) Marks a stressed syllable with "falling tone".

Usage notes edit

The Unicode code point U+0341 COMBINING ACUTE TONE MARK is canonically equivalent to U+0301 COMBINING ACUTE ACCENT.

Compare grave accent: ◌̀.

Synonyms edit

[1]: ˥

Further reading edit

English edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. Used on loan words to mark e's (mostly final) that are pronounced rather than silent, e.g. animé, café, exposé, maté, resumé, paté, saké; Malé, Pokémon. (Cf. expose, mate, resume, pate, sake, male.)
  2. (lexicography) Used in glossaries, such as for Latinate technical terms or Classical names, to mark stressed syllables when full pronunciations are not given, as the pronunciation is largely predictable once stress-placement is known.
  3. (poetry, rare) Used to show an unexpectedly stressed syllable, or where the choice of stress is metrically important, e.g. idiosyncratic caléndar; noun rébel as opposed to verb rebél; áll trádes as a spondee rather than iamb.
  4. Alternative form of ◌̀
  5. (obsolete) Used in the digraph ⟨ée⟩.
    • 1567, Ovid, “The Twelfth Booke”, in Arthur Golding, transl., The XV. Bookes of P. Ouidius Naso, Entytuled Metamorphosis, [], London: [] Willyam Seres [], →OCLC, folio 152, recto:
      And in his wound the seared blood did make a gréeuous sound,
      As when a peece of stéele red who tane vp with tongs is drownd
      In water by the smith, it spirts and hisseth in the trowgh.
    • 1577, William Harrison, The Description of England in Holinshed’s Chronicles, Volume 1, Book 3, Chapter 12 “Of venemous beastes &c.,”[1]
      Our hony alſo is taken and reputed to be the beſt bycauſe it is harder, better wrought & clenlyer veſſelled vp, thẽ that which cõmeth from beyond the ſea, where they ſtampe and ſtraine their combes, Bées, & young Blowinges altogither into the ſtuffe, as I haue béene informed.
    • 1580, Iohn Stow (collector), The Chronicles of England, from Brute vnto This Present Yeare of Christ 1580., London: [] Ralphe Newberie, [], page 512:
      The King ſent to the Londoners requeſting to borrowe of them one thouſande pounde, whiche they ſtoutely denyed, and alſo euil entreated, bette and néere hand ſlew a certain Lumbard that woulde haue lent the King the ſayde ſumme, which when the King heard he was maruellouſly angried, and calling togither almoſt all the nobles of the lande, hée opened to them the malitiouſneſſe of the Londoners, and cõplayned of theyr preſumption, the whyche noble men gaue counſell, that their inſolencie ſhoulde with ſpéede be oppreſſed, and theyr pride abated.
    • 1582, Stephen Batman (translator), Batman vppon Bartholome his booke De proprietatibus rerum, London: Thomas East, Book 5, Chapter 26, “Of the shoulders,”[2]
      The twisted forkes be néedfull to binde the shoulders, and to depart them from the breast.
    • 1587, Raphaell Holinshed, Iohn Hooker, “Of the food and diet of the Engliſh”, in The firſt and ſecond volumes of Chronicles [] , volume I, London: Henry Denham, page 169:
      The raueled cheat therfore is generallie ſo made that out of one buſhell of meale, after two and twentie pounds of bran be ſifted and taken from it (wherevnto they ad the gurgeons that riſe from the manchet) they make thirtie cast, euerie lofe weighing eightéene ounces into the ouen and ſixteene ounces out []
    • 1588, John Harvey, A Discoursive Probleme concerning Prophesies, how far they are to be valued or credited, page 8:
      I take it néedles, and booteles to make ouer déepe, or ſcrupulous enquiry into euery moſt auncient, and obſolete antiquitie: I preſuppoſe it ſufficient to peruſe, and examine the moſt famous, and moſt autentique ſuppoſed propheſies, that haue curranteſt paſſage, and repaſſage in moſt mouthes, and bookes: conſidering how eaſily euerie indifferent man may proportionably make eſtimation of the woorſe, by the better, and ratably value the one by the other.
    • 1589, Thomas Nashe, The Anatomie of Absurditie[3]:
      [] euen ſo it fareth with mee, who béeing about to anatomize Abſurditie, am vrged to take a view of ſundry mens vanitie, a ſuruey of their follie, a briefe of their barbariſme []
    • 1590, T[homas] L[odge], “Alindas Comfort to Perplexed Rosalynd”, in Rosalynde. Euphues Golden Legacie: [], London: [] Thomas Orwin for T. G[ubbin] and John Busbie, →OCLC; republished [Glasgow]: [ [] Hunterian Club], [1876], →OCLC, folio 13, verso, page 34:
      If thou grieueſt that beeing the daughter of a Prince, and enuie thwarteth thée with ſuch hard exigents, thinke that royaltie is a faire marke; that Crownes haue croſſes when mirth is in Cottages; that the fairer the Roſe is, the ſooner it is bitten with Catterpillers; []
    • 1591, T[homas] L[odge] of Lincolns, Catharos Diogenes in his Singularitie: Wherein is comprehended his merrie baighting fit for all mens benefits: Christened by him, A Nettle for Nice Noſes, London: Iohn Busbie, page 12; republished [Glasgow]: [Hunterian Club], [1875]:
      I appoynt thée no more continencie, than to eate while thy bellie is full, nor conſtancie, but to brawle rather than burne: a filbert is better than a faggot, except it be an Athenian ſhe handfull: you know that Coſmoſophos, euer ſince your laſt mariage, how doth the father of your ſonne in law?
    • 1603, Thomas Dekker, “The VVonderfull Yeare”, in The Non-Dramatic Works of Thomas Dekker, volume I, published 1884, pages 123–124:
      As for the Tapſter, he fled into the Cellar, rapping out fiue or ſixe plaine Country oathes, that hée would drowne himſelfe in a moſt villanous Stand of Ale, if the ſicke Londoner ſtoode at the doore any longer.
  6. Retained in foreign loan words (mostly French é), particularly when unassimilated:
    (non-final) ancien régime, coup d'état, décor, déjà vu, détente, élite, résumé, séance.
    (final) attaché, blasé, canapé, cliché, communiqué, entrée, mêlée, fiancé, fiancée, papier-mâché, passé, pâté, plié, résumé, risqué, naïveté, toupée, touché, as well as café, exposé above.

Usage notes edit

The first and last uses are not always distinct, but can be differentiated in words such as pâté ~ paté and résumé ~ resumé, where the final acute is retained even when the other French diacritics are dropped.

Ancient Greek edit

 
A gray lowercase alpha with a red acute accent.

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Greek script, called ὀξύς (oxús, sharp) in Ancient Greek, and found on Ά (Á)/ά (á), Έ (É)/έ (é), Ή ()/ή (), Ί (Í)/ί (í), Ό (Ó)/ό (ó), Ύ (Ú)/ύ (ú) and Ώ ()/ώ ().

See also edit

Catalan edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called accent agut (acute accent) in Catalan, and found on É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó and Ú/ú.

Usage notes edit

Czech edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called čárka (line) in Czech, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó, Ú/ú and Ý/ý.

Usage notes edit

The acute accent indicates that a vowel is pronounced long. The letter Ů/ů also indicates a long vowel and is pronounced the same as Ú/ú.

Dutch edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called accent aigu (acute accent) in Dutch, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó, Ú/ú, Ý/ý and ÍJ́/íj́.

Usage notes edit

The acute accent is used to disambiguate words when the placement of stress is important to distinguish meanings (e.g., één in its numerical sense of “one”). It is also used to place emphasis on a specific word or syllable. It is also retained in some French loanwords, mostly to distinguish /eː/ from /ə/.

Esperanto edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called dekstra korno (right horn) in Esperanto, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó and Ú/ú.

Usage notes edit

This diacritic is used to mark stress in phonetic transcriptions of foreign words.

Faroese edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called strika (line) in Faroese, and found on Á/á, Í/í, Ó/ó, Ú/ú and Ý/ý.

Usage notes edit

The line is not seen as a diacritic, and all the letters are considered separate letters of the alphabet each having its own name. Other diacritic letters like É/é and Ć/ć appear in names of foreign origin.

French edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called accent aigu (acute accent) in French, and found on É/é.

Greek edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. (orthography) The Greek tonos (τόνος) stress mark used in modern Greek.

Coordinate terms edit

See also edit

#Ancient Greek for the oxia (οξεία) diacritic.

Hokkien edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. Represents the second tone of Taiwanese Hokkien in Pe̍h-ōe-jī.
  2. Represents the fifth tone of Taiwanese Hokkien in Taiwanese Phonetic Symbols.

Hungarian edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called éles ékezet (sharp accent) in Hungarian, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó and Ú/ú.

Icelandic edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called broddur (accent) in Icelandic, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó, Ú/ú and Ý/ý.

Irish edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called síneadh fada (long mark) in Irish, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó and Ú/ú. It is used to indicate a long vowel, but a vowel without the mark can also be a long vowel in some circumstances.

Italian edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. Used to distinguish /e o/ from /ɛ ɔ/.

Latin edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called apex (apex) in Latin, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó and Ú/ú. It indicates that the vowels are long.
    • c. 100 CE Roman inscription (image):
      C[aius]·AVRELIVS / PARTꟵENIVS / ÓRNÁMENTꟾS·DEC[urionalibus] / HONÓRÁTVS·COL[oniae]·AVG[ustae] / NEMAVSꟾ·ꟾIIIIꟾVIR·AVG[ustalis] / COL[onia]·CÓPIA·CLAVD[ia]·AVG[usta]·LVGVD[uni] / ITEM·NÁRBÓNE·MÁRTIO / ET·FIR[ma]·IVL[ia]·SECVND[anorum] ARAVSIÓNE / ET·FORO·IVLIꟾ·PÁCÁTO / VBꟾQVE·GRÁTVITꟾS·HONÓRIBVS

Usage notes edit

In Classical Latin, an apex is not used with the letter ⟨I⟩; rather, the letter is written taller, as ⟨⟩.

Synonyms edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Ligurian edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called acénto acûto (acute accent) in Ligurian, and found on É/é and Ó/ó.
    1. Used to denote stressed /e/, /u/

See also edit

Macedonian edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. (lexicography) stressed-syllable indicator. Not used in everyday writing.
    А́ а́ Е́ е́ И́ и́ О́ о́ У́ у́ Л́ л́ Р́ р́

See also edit

Mandarin edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called 尖音符 (jiānyīnfú, acute tone mark) in Mandarin, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó, Ú/ú and Ǘ/ǘ, representing the 陽平阳平 (yángpíng shēng, light level tone), also known as the 第二聲第二声 (second tone), in Pinyin.

Usage notes edit

Not to be confused with ◌ˊ, which represents the second tone in the Mandarin Zhuyin script.

See also edit

Navajo edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́ • (wódahí)

  1. high tone

Norwegian edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called akutt aksent (acute accent) in Norwegian, and found on É/é and Ó/ó.

Polish edit

 
Two typographical varieties of Ć and ć.

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called kreska (line) in Polish, and found on Ć/ć, Ń/ń, Ó/ó, Ś/ś and Ź/ź.

Usage notes edit

On a consonant, the kreska indicates that the consonant is pronounced with a palatal articulation. It is used only when the consonant is not followed by a vowel. A palatal consonant followed by a vowel is indicated by I/i after the consonant instead.

On the letter Ó/ó, the kreska indicates that it is pronounced as U/u but may alternate with O/o in inflections.

Further reading edit

  • ◌́ in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called acento agudo (acute accent) in Portuguese, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó and Ú/ú.

Usage notes edit

  • In the letter a, forms á with the stressed sound /a/, as in and sabiá.
  • In the letter e, forms é with the stressed sound /ɛ/, as in and maré.
  • In the letter i, forms i with the stressed sound /i/, as in índio and íntimo.
  • In the letter o, forms ó with the stressed sound /ɔ/, as in avó and faraó.
  • In the letter u, forms ú with the stressed sound /u/, as in último and único.
  • Some words end in -ém (stressed /ẽj̃/) or -éns (stressed /ẽj̃s/), as in alguém, também and parabéns.

Romani edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script in Romani, and found on Ć/ć, Ćh/ćh, /, Ŕ/ŕ, Ś/ś and Ź/ź.

References edit

  • “Phonemic Values”, in ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project[4], 2000, archived from the original on 2005-02-26
  • Marcel Courthiade (2009), “DECISION : "THE ROMANI ALPHABET"”, in Melinda Rézműves, editor, Morri angluni rromane ćhibǎqi evroputni lavustik = Első rromani nyelvű európai szótáram : cigány, magyar, angol, francia, spanyol, német, ukrán, román, horvát, szlovák, görög [My First European-Romani Dictionary: Romani, Hungarian, English, French, Spanish, German, Ukrainian, Romanian, Croatian, Slovak, Greek] (in hu,en), Budapest: Fővárosi Onkormányzat Cigány Ház--Romano Kher, →ISBN, page 499
  • Introduction 3. How to read Rromani”, in R.E.D-RROM[5], accessed October 2, 2021
  • Yūsuke Sumi (2018) ニューエクスプレスプラス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Plus Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, published 2021, →ISBN, →OCLC, pages 13-15

Russian edit

 
Russian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ru

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. (lexicography) stressed-syllable indicator

Related terms edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. (lexicography) A diacritical mark, both in the Cyrillic and Latin script, used to denote a long-rising accent. Not used in everyday writing. Can be used on vowels and the syllabic R:
    • Cyrillic: А́а́ Е́е́ И́и́ О́о́ У́у́ Р́р́
    • Latin: Áá Éé Íí Óó Úú Ŕŕ

Slovak edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called dĺžeň (lengthener) in Slovak, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ĺ/ĺ, Ó/ó, Ŕ/ŕ, Ú/ú and Ý/ý.

Spanish edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called acento agudo (acute accent) in Spanish, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó and Ú/ú. Used to indicate stress patterns not predictable from orthographic rules.

Vietnamese edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called dấu sắc (sharp mark) in Vietnamese, and found on Á/á, /, /, É/é, /ế, Í/í, Ó/ó, /, /, Ú/ú, / and Ý/ý. Used to indicate mid-rising, tense tone.

Usage notes edit

In Vietnamese handwriting and signmaking, this tone mark may be written as a vertical line, like a combining ', and the letter I/i retains its tittle.

In earlier versions of Unicode, this tone mark was encoded as U+0341 rather than U+0301. Unicode compliant processes do not intentionally distinguish them.

Welsh edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called acen ddyrchafedig (raised accent) in Welsh, and found on Á/á, É/é, Í/í, Ó/ó, Ú/ú, / and Ý/ý.

Yoruba edit

Diacritical mark edit

◌́

  1. A diacritical mark of the Latin script, called àmì ohùn òkè (high-tone mark) in Yoruba, and found on Á/á, É/é, Ẹ́/ẹ́, Í/í, Ó/ó, Ọ́/ọ́, Ú/ú, Ń/ń and /ḿ. Used to indicate high-tone, or rising-tone when after ◌̀

See also edit

tone marks

ǃXóõ edit

Article edit

◌́

  1. The definite article
    tùù 'people', tùú 'the people'