See also: -ος, -ός, and ὅσ'

Ancient Greek edit

Pronunciation edit

 

Etymology 1 edit

PIE word
*yós

From Proto-Hellenic *yós, from Proto-Indo-European *yós, *yéh₂, *yód (who, which), from the relative stem *yo-, from the anaphoric stem *i-, *ey-.

Cognates include Sanskrit यद् (yás, yā, yad), Avestan𐬫𐬋(), and Phrygian ιος (ios /⁠jos⁠/). See also οἷος (hoîos), ὅσος (hósos).

Pronoun edit

ὅς (hósm,  f (hḗ),  n ()

  1. (in Homeric Greek, often demonstrative pronoun) this
  2. (relative) who, which, that
Inflection edit
Derived terms edit
See also edit
References edit
  • ὅς, ἥ, ὅ”, in Liddell & Scott (1940) A Greek–English Lexicon, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Smyth, Herbert Weir (1920), “Part II: Inflection”, in A Greek grammar for colleges, Cambridge: American Book Company, § 338: relative pronoun
  • William Bedell Stanford (1959) [1947]. "Introduction, Grammatical Introduction". Homer: Odyssey I-XII 1 (2nd ed.). Macmillan Education Ltd. p. lxiii, § 12.1 12.2.

Etymology 2 edit

PIE word
*swé

Like (, him), from Proto-Indo-European *swé (reflexive pronoun). Cognate with Sanskrit स्व (svá). See also ἑός (heós).

Alternative forms edit

Determiner edit

ὅς (hósm (feminine , neuter ὅν); first/second declension (third person singular possessive determiner)

  1. (with noun) his, her, its
  2. (as substantive, sometimes with article) his, hers
    1. (in the plural) his or her people, friends, family; his possessions
Inflection edit

Further reading edit

  • ὅς, ἥ, ὅν”, in Liddell & Scott (1940) A Greek–English Lexicon, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • William Bedell Stanford (1959) [1947]. "Introduction, Grammatical Introduction". Homer: Odyssey I-XII 1 (2nd ed.). Macmillan Education Ltd. p. lxiii, § 12.1.
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN