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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From puss +‎ -y.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pussy (plural pussies)

  1. (informal) An affectionate term for a cat. [from 17th c.]
    • 2007, Liz Jones, "Are cats the new dogs?", The Independent, 17 Nov 07:
      And although, as someone recently said to me, they are not "designer" (she had expected my pussies to be expensive, with a pedigree), to me my cats are the most beautiful in the world.
  2. (colloquial, now rare) An affectionate term for a woman or girl, seen as having characteristics associated with cats such as sweetness. [from 16th c.]
    • 2010, Jojo Moyes, "Why love letters are better left unread", The Telegraph, 3 Jun 2010:
      If Lloyd George’s endearments to mistress Frances Stevenson – “My darling Pussy. You might phone… on Friday if you can come. Don’t let Hankey see you” – had been made similarly public, would he have maintained his own reputation as a towering statesman?
  3. (vulgar, slang) The female genitalia; the vulva and/or vagina. [from 17th c.]
    You have a lovely pussy!
    • 2016, Alexandra Sirowy, The Telling (young adult fiction), Simon & Schuster, page 6:
      There's a lot of disagreement about where that word came from. Pussy is actually a diminutive of pusillanimous, meaning cowardly. Although maybe the origin doesn't matter, since everyone equates it with the female anatomy anyway?
  4. Anything soft and furry; a bloom form, or catkin, as on the pussy willow. [from 19th c.]
  5. (vulgar, slang, uncountable) Sexual intercourse with a woman. [from 20th c.]
    I’m gonna get me some pussy tonight.
  6. (derogatory, vulgar, slang, chiefly Canada, US) A weak, cowardly, or effeminate man. [from 20th c.]
    You're such a pussy!
    • 1925, Sinclair Lewis, Martin Arrowsmith (fiction), Harcourt Brace & Company:
      You ought to hear some of the docs that are the sweetest old pussies with their patients—the way they bawl out the nurses. But labs—they seem sort of real. I don't suppose you can bluff a bacteria—what is it?—bacterium?
    • 2007 November 26, Matt Keating, “Do everyone a favour and don't bring your cold to work”, in The Guardian[1], archived from the original on 6 Oct 2014:
      I couldn't carry the burden of shame engendered by the bully-boy advertising of "max-strength" cold and flu remedies, the obvious subtext of which is "Get to work, you pussy."
  7. (dated) A game of tip-cat.
SynonymsEdit
HypernymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From pus +‎ -y.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: pŭs'i, IPA(key): /ˈpʌsi/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

pussy (comparative pussier, superlative pussiest)

  1. (medicine) Containing pus.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

AdjectiveEdit

pussy (comparative more pussy, superlative most pussy)

  1. (slang, dated) Alternative form of pursy

Further readingEdit

  • pussy at OneLook Dictionary Search

ReferencesEdit