ū U+016B, ū
LATIN SMALL LETTER U WITH MACRON
Composition:u [U+0075] + ◌̄ [U+0304]
Ū
[U+016A]
Latin Extended-A Ŭ
[U+016C]

Translingual edit

Symbol edit

ū

  1. (phonetics) A common convention for a long vowel u
  2. (international standards) transliterates Indic (or equivalent).

English edit

Symbol edit

ū

  1. (lexicography) A dictionary transcription for the USE vowel; also an orthographic ⟨u⟩ with a diacritic that marks it as having that value, as in the word "tune".
  2. (lexicography) A dictionary transcription for the GOOSE vowel
    Synonyms: ü, o͞o

Hawaiian edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Polynesian *susu (compare Maori ū, Tongan huhu) from Proto-Oceanic *susu (compare with Fijian sucu), from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *susu (compare with Malay susu), from Proto-Austronesian *susu (compare with Tagalog suso).

Noun edit

ū

  1. breast
  2. udder
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-Polynesian *su. Compare Tongan .

Verb edit

ū

  1. (stative) to drip
  2. (stative) moist, soaked, oozing
Derived terms edit

References edit

  • Ross Clark and Simon J. Greenhill, editors (2011), “huhu”, in POLLEX-Online: The Polynesian Lexicon Project Online[3]
  • Pukui, Mary Kawena; Elbert (1986), “ū”, in Hawaiian Dictionary, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press

Japanese edit

Romanization edit

ū

  1. Rōmaji transcription of うう
  2. Rōmaji transcription of うー
  3. Rōmaji transcription of ウー

Latgalian edit

Letter edit

ū (upper case Ū)

  1. The thirty-second letter of the Latgalian alphabet, called ū and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Latvian edit

 
Latvian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia lv

Etymology edit

Proposed in 1908 as part of the new Latvian spelling by the scientific commission headed by K. Mīlenbahs, which was accepted and began to be taught in schools in 1909. Prior to that, Latvian had been written in German Fraktur, and sporadically in Cyrillic.

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs an audio pronunciation. If you are a native speaker with a microphone, please record this word. The recorded pronunciation will appear here when it's ready.

Letter edit

 
Ū

ū (lower case, upper case Ū)

  1. The thirtieth letter of the Latvian alphabet, called garais u and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Lithuanian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

ū (upper case Ū)

  1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Lithuanian alphabet, called u ilgoji and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Livonian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

ū (upper case Ū)

  1. The thirty-sixth letter of the Livonian alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Maori edit

Letter edit

ū (upper case Ū)

  1. The seventeenth letter of the Maori alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Polynesian *susu (compare Hawaiian ū, Tongan huhu) from Proto-Oceanic *susu (compare with Fijian sucu), from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *susu (compare with Malay susu),[1][2] from Proto-Austronesian *susu (compare with Tagalog suso).

Noun edit

ū

  1. breast
  2. udder, teat
Derived terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb edit

ū

  1. to strike home, to hit the mark (as of a weapon)
  2. to land (as of a vessel), to come ashore
  3. to comply
  4. (stative) to be firm, fixed, unyielding

References edit

  1. ^ Tregear, Edward (1891) Maori-Polynesian Comparative Dictionary[1], Wellington, New Zealand: Lyon and Blair, page 569-70
  2. ^ Ross Clark and Simon J. Greenhill, editors (2011), “huhu”, in POLLEX-Online: The Polynesian Lexicon Project Online[2]

Min Nan edit

For pronunciation and definitions of ū – see (“to have; to possess; there is; to exist; etc.”).
(This term, ū, is the Pe̍h-ōe-jī form of ).

Samogitian edit

Letter edit

ū (upper case Ū)

  1. The twenty-ninth letter of the Samogitian alphabet, called ėlguojė ū and written in the Latin script.

See also edit

See also edit

Tausug edit

Noun edit

ū

  1. Alternative spelling of u