See also: SNAP

EnglishEdit

 snap on Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch snappen (to bite; seize) or Low German snappen (to bite; seize), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *snappōną (to snap; snatch; chatter), intensive form of *snapāną ("to snap; grab"; > Old Norse snapa (to get; scrounge)), from Proto-Indo-European *ksnew- (to scrape; scratch; grate; rub). Cognate with West Frisian snappe (to get; catch; snap), German schnappen (to grab), Swedish snappa (to snatch).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /snæp/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æp

NounEdit

snap (countable and uncountable, plural snaps)

  1. A quick breaking or cracking sound or the action of producing such a sound.
  2. A sudden break.
  3. An attempt to seize, bite, attack, or grab.
  4. The act of making a snapping sound by pressing the thumb and an opposing finger of the same hand together and suddenly releasing the grip so that the finger hits against the palm.
  5. A fastening device that makes a snapping sound when used.
  6. (informal) A photograph; a snapshot.
    We took a few snaps of the old church before moving on.
  7. The sudden release of something held under pressure or tension.
  8. A thin circular cookie or similar baked good.
    a ginger snap
  9. A brief, sudden period of a certain weather; used primarily in the phrase cold snap.
  10. A very short period of time (figuratively, the time taken to snap one's fingers), or a task that can be accomplished in such a period.
    It'll be a snap to get that finished.
    I can fix most vacuum cleaners in a snap.
  11. A snap bean such as Phaseolus vulgaris.
  12. (American football) A backward pass or handoff of a football from its position on the ground that puts the ball in play; a hike.
    • 2020 April 24, Ken Belson and Ben Shpigel, “Full Round 1 2020 N.F.L. Picks and Analysis”, in New York Time[1]:
      According to Pro Football Focus, Simmons, listed at 6-foot-4 and 238 pounds, played at least 100 snaps at five positions — slot cornerback, edge rusher, linebacker and both safety spots — and finished with 16½ tackles for a loss, eight sacks, eight pass deflections and three interceptions.
  13. (somewhat colloquial) A rivet: a scrapbooking embellishment.
  14. (Britain, regional) A small meal, a snack; lunch.
    • 1913, D H Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, Penguin 2006, page 89:
      When I went to put my coat on at snap time, what should go runnin' up my arm but a mouse.
  15. (uncountable) A card game, primarily for children, in which players cry "snap" to claim pairs of matching cards as they are turned up.
  16. (obsolete) A greedy fellow.
  17. That which is, or may be, snapped up; something bitten off, seized, or obtained by a single quick movement; hence, a bite, morsel, or fragment; a scrap.
    • 1625 (first performance), Ben[jamin] Jonson, The Staple of Nevves. [], London: [] I[ohn] B[eale] for Robert Allot [], published 1631, OCLC 81096167, (please specify the act number in uppercase Roman numerals, and the scene number in lowercase Roman numerals):
      He's a nimble fellow, / And alike skill'd in every liberal science, / As having certain snaps of all.
  18. briskness; vigour; energy; decision
  19. (slang, archaic) Any circumstance out of which money may be made or an advantage gained. used primarily in the phrase soft snap.
    • 1876, New Shakspere Society (London, England), Publications (page 169)
      A Sea Soldier is certaine of victuals and wages, where the Land Soldiers pay will hardly find him sustenance. A Sea Soldier may now and than chaunce to haue a snapp at a bootie or a price, which may in an instant make him a fortune []
    • 1920, Cornell Forester (volumes 1-6)
      The Profs they lead a jolly life, jolly life, / They're free from every care and strife, care and strife. / They make the studes, poor studes fall into line; / I wish the Profs' soft snap were mine.
  20. (slang) Something that is easy or effortless.
    • 2003, Clive Selwood, All the Moves (but None of the Licks) (page 33)
      The job was a snap. I travelled the country averaging a thousand miles a week and, since the previous incumbent had been a lazy bugger, managed to treble the business. It was a cinch.
  21. A snapper, or snap beetle.
  22. (physics, humorous) jounce (the fourth derivative of the position vector with respect to time), followed by crackle and pop
  23. A quick offhand shot with a firearm; a snap shot.
  24. (colloquial) Something of no value.
    not worth a snap
  25. (Internet) A visual message sent through the Snapchat application.
    • 2014, Newton Lee, Facebook Nation: Total Information Awareness, p. 51:
      By April 2014, over 700 million snaps are shared per day on Snapchat — more than Facebook, WhatsApp, and other social networks.
    • 2015, Suse Barnes, Like, Follow, Share: Awesome, Actionable Social Media Marketing to Maximise Your Online Potential, p. 238:
      The oldest snaps will be deleted after 24 hours, and to keep the story going you'll have to add new content regularly.
    • 2015, Yuval Karniel, Amit Lavie-Dinur, Privacy and Fame: How We Expose Ourselves across Media Platforms, p. 120:
      While Snapchat bases its whole product marketing on the auto-deletion of the snaps (images and videos) so that they are not stored, recent reports indicate otherwise.
  26. (Linux) A package provided for the application sandboxing system snapd developed by Canonical.
  27. (uncountable) A crisp or pithy quality; epigrammatic point or force.
  28. A tool used by riveters.
  29. A tool used by glass-moulders.
  30. (slang, dated) A brief theatrical engagement.
  31. (slang, dated) A cheat or sharper.
  32. A newsflash.
    • 2013, Paul Chantler, ‎Peter Stewart, Basic Radio Journalism (page 159)
      A 'snap' usually becomes a 'newsflash' on air. Keep snaps short, only run them when news is really 'hot', and try not to break a story within a few minutes of the bulletin unless it is top priority.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

snap (third-person singular simple present snaps, present participle snapping, simple past and past participle snapped or (obsolete) snapt)

  1. (intransitive, transitive) To fracture or break apart suddenly.
    He snapped his stick in anger.
    If you bend it too much, it will snap.
  2. (intransitive) To give forth or produce a sharp cracking noise; to crack.
    Blazing firewood snaps.
  3. (intransitive) To attempt to seize or bite with the teeth, beak, etc.
    A dog snaps at a passenger. A fish snaps at the bait.
  4. (intransitive) To attempt to seize with eagerness.
    She snapped at the chance to appear on television.
  5. (intransitive) To speak abruptly or sharply.
    He snapped at me for the slightest mistake.
  6. (intransitive) To give way abruptly and loudly.
  7. (intransitive) To suffer a mental breakdown, usually while under tension.
    She should take a break before she snaps.
  8. (intransitive) To flash or appear to flash as with light.
  9. (intransitive) To fit or fasten together with a snapping sound.
  10. (intransitive, computing, graphical user interface) To jump to a fixed position relative to another element.
    The floating toolbar will snap to the edge of the screen when dragged towards it.
  11. (transitive) To snatch with or as if with the teeth.
    • 1698, Robert South, Twelve Sermons upon Several Subjects and Occasions:
      He, by playing too often at the mouth of death, has been snapped by it at last.
  12. (transitive) To pull apart with a snapping sound; to pop loose.
  13. (transitive) To say abruptly or sharply.
  14. (transitive, dated) To speak to abruptly or sharply; to treat snappishly; usually with up.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Granville to this entry?)
  15. (transitive) To cause something to emit a snapping sound, especially by closing it rapidly.
    • 1886, Peter Christen Asbjørnsen, H.L. Brækstad, transl., Folk and Fairy Tales, page 71:
      Three more birds came in, and as each took up his roosting place, the old bird repeated his challenge by snapping his beak at them.
    • 1926, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, The Land of Mist[2]:
      "Time's up!" said Mr. Peeble, snapping his watch.
    to snap a fastener
    to snap a whip
  16. (transitive) To close something using a snap as a fastener.
  17. (transitive)
    A video of a person snapping their fingers.
    Alternative snapping technique
    To snap one's fingers: to make a snapping sound, often by pressing the thumb and an opposing finger of the same hand together and suddenly releasing the grip so that the finger hits against the palm; alternatively, by bringing the index finger quickly down onto the middle finger and thumb.
  18. (transitive) To cause to move suddenly and smartly.
  19. (transitive) To take a photograph; to release a camera's shutter (which may make a snapping sound).
    He snapped a picture of me with my mouth open and my eyes closed.
    • 2020 December 2, Paul Bigland, “My weirdest and wackiest Rover yet”, in Rail, page 64:
      I arrive at the station in time to snap a few pictures and observe my fellow passengers.
  20. (transitive, American football) To put (a football) in play by a backward pass or handoff from its position on the ground; to hike (a football).
    He can snap the ball to a back twenty yards behind him.
  21. To misfire.
    The gun snapped.
  22. (cricket, transitive) To catch out sharply (a batsman who has just snicked a bowled ball).

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

snap!

  1. The cry used in a game of snap when winning a hand.
  2. (Britain, Australia) By extension from the card game, "I've got one the same!", "Me too!"
    Snap! We've both got pink buckets and spades.
  3. (Britain) Ritual utterance of agreement (after the cry in the card game snap).
  4. (Canada, US) Used in place of expletive to express surprise, usually in response to a negative statement or news; often used facetiously.
    "I just ran over your phone with my car." "Oh, snap!"
  5. (Britain, Australia, New Zealand) Ritual utterance used after something is said by two people at exactly the same time.
    "Wasn't that John?" "Wasn't that John?" "Snap!"

SynonymsEdit

  • (used after simultaneous utterance): jinx

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

snap (not comparable)

  1. (informal, attributive) Done, made, performed, etc., quickly and unexpectedly, or without deliberation.
    a snap judgment or decision    a snap political convention
    • 1889, The Kansas City Medical Index-Lancet, volume 10, issue 8:
      Now I should consider it a very snap judgment or a snap diagnosis for anybody to come into a medical society

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • snap at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

snap

  1. first-person singular present indicative of snappen
  2. imperative of snappen

AnagramsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

snap m (genitive singular snaip, plural snapan)

  1. trigger (of a gun)
  2. morsel

Derived termsEdit

  • snapach (having a trigger; that misses fire; that fires; that strikes fast)

VerbEdit

snap (past snap, future snapaidh, verbal noun snapadh, past participle snapta)

  1. pull a trigger
  2. misfire

Derived termsEdit

  • snapaireachd (snapping, snapping sound, as that caused by pulling the trigger of a gun)

ReferencesEdit

  • snap” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

snap m (plural snaps)

  1. snap (photograph)