Translingual edit

Symbol edit

oss

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-2 & ISO 639-3 language code for Ossetian.

English edit

Noun edit

oss (plural osses)

  1. Alternative spelling of 'oss.

Anagrams edit

Icelandic edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse oss.

Pronoun edit

oss

  1. accusative and dative form of the word vér.
    Þetta kemur oss ekki við.
    This does not affect us.

Declension edit

Icelandic honorific pronouns
plural first person second person
nominative vér þér
accusative oss yður
dative oss yður
genitive vor yðar

Lombard edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ossum, popular variant of os, ossis, from Proto-Italic *ōs, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃ésth₁ (bone), *h₂óst.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

oss

  1. bone

References edit

  • AIS: Sprach- und Sachatlas Italiens und der Südschweiz [Linguistic and Ethnographic Atlas of Italy and Southern Switzerland] – map 90: “le ossa; un osso” – on navigais-web.pd.istc.cnr.it
  • Arrighi, Cletto (1896) Dizionario milanese-italiano, col repertorio italiano-milanese: [] [1] (in Italian), Milan: Hoepli, page 489

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

oss

  1. us
  2. (reflexive; also oss selv) ourselves

See also edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse accusative and dative oss of vér, from Proto-Germanic accusative *uns, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥smé.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

oss

  1. (personal) us; me and at least one other person; objective case of me and vi
  2. (reflexive) ourselves
  3. (dialectal, Gudbrandsdal, Romsdal, Trøndelag, personal) we
    Når va det oss skoillj fårrå te skævven?
    When we were supposed to go to the forest?
    • 1770, Edvard Storm, “Guten aa Jenta paa Fjøshjellen”, in Den fyrste morgonblånen, Oslo: Novus, published 1990, page 233:
      Dæmæ venda os aat Bygden
      thus we turn towards the village

References edit

  • “oss”, in Norsk Ordbok: ordbok over det norske folkemålet og det nynorske skriftmålet, Oslo: Samlaget, 1950-2016

Old Norse edit

Pronoun edit

oss

  1. accusative of vér
  2. dative of vér

Declension edit


Descendants edit

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin ossum, popular variant of os.

Noun edit

oss m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) bone

Noun edit

oss m (plural ossa)

  1. (Sutsilvan) bone

Swedish edit

Alternative forms edit

  • (obsolete typography)

Etymology edit

From Old Norse oss, from Proto-Germanic *uns, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥smé.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ɔs/
  • (file)

Pronoun edit

oss

  1. us (objective case)
    Såg du oss där?
    Did you see us there?
    • 1981, X Models (lyrics and music), “Två av oss [Two of us]”:
      Det finns bara en av mig och det är jag. Det finns bara en av dig och det är du. Det finns bara två av oss, och det är vi.
      There is only one of me and that is I. There is only one of you [object] and that is you [subject]. There are only two of us, and that is us [we – subject]. [Swedish has some of the same subject/object fuzziness as English, but a standalone "Det är <pronoun>" idiomatically (through intuition rather than being taught) uses the subject form]
  2. reflexive case of vi; compare ourselves
    Vi skulle vilja lära oss jonglera.
    We would like to learn how to juggle.

Usage notes edit

Note that some verbs have special senses when used reflexively. For example, do not confuse vi lär oss att... ("we learn to...") [reflexive] with de lär oss att... ("they teach us to...") and vi lär oss själva att... ("we teach ourselves to..."). Here, lär means teach(es) if it is not reflexive, but learn(s) if it is reflexive. Hence the need for the separate pronoun "oss själva" to be used when object and subject agree, but the verb nevertheless should not be used in the reflexive case.

Declension edit

See also edit

References edit

Anagrams edit

Võro edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *oksa.

Noun edit

oss (genitive ossa, partitive ossa)

  1. branch

Inflection edit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.