Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 22:15
See also: Don, đơn, and DON

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin dominus, "lord", "head of household", akin to Spanish don and Italian dom; from domus, "house", + diminutive suffix -inus. Compare dominie.

NounEdit

don (plural dons)

  1. A university professor, particularly one at Oxford or Cambridge.
  2. A mafia boss.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

A contraction of Middle English do on. Compare also doff.

VerbEdit

don (third-person singular simple present dons, present participle donning, simple past and past participle donned)

  1. (clothing) to put on, to dress in
    To don one's clothes.
AntonymsEdit
  • (put on clothes): doff
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

AdjectiveEdit

don

  1. deep

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin donum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

don m (plural dons)

  1. gift, talent
  2. gift (present)
  3. donation

External linksEdit


IrishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronunciationEdit

ContractionEdit

don

  1. Contraction of do an.
    Thug mé don bhuachaill é. — I gave it to the boy.
    Tá mé ag dul don Spáinn. — I'm going to Spain.
Usage notesEdit

This contraction is obligatory, i.e. *do an never appears uncontracted. It triggers lenition of a following consonant other than d, s, or t.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Irish don (misfortune, evil).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

don

  1. misfortune
Usage notesEdit

Used only in a few stock maledictions such as Do dhon is do dhuais ort!, Don is duais ort!, Mo dhon is mo dhograinn ort! (all basically "bad luck to you!") and Don d'fhiafraí ort! "Don't be so inquisitive!".

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
don dhon ndon
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a shortening of an earlier donno, from dom'no (used by Dante), from Latin domnus < dominus.

NounEdit

don m (inv)

  1. Father (a title given to priests)
  2. A title of respect to a man.

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

don

  1. rafsi of do.

Nigerian PidginEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English done.

VerbEdit

don

  1. have (perfect aspect auxiliary)
    Wi don chop = "We have eaten"

Northern SamiEdit

PronounEdit

don

  1. you (thou)

InflectionEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *dōną (to do), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁- (to make, do, place). Cognate with Old Frisian dūa, duā, dwā (West Frisian dwaan), Old Saxon dōn, doan, duan, duon, Old Dutch duon (Dutch doen), Old High German tuon (German tun); and, outside the Germanic languages, with Ancient Greek τίθημι (títhēmi), Latin faciō, Old Irish dorat (Irish déan), Old Church Slavonic дѣти (děti).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dōn

  1. to do

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle English: don
    • English: to do
    • Scots: dae

Old IrishEdit

NounEdit

don ?

  1. misfortune, evil

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *dōną. Compare Old English dōn, Old Frisian dūa, duā, dwā, Old Dutch duon, Old High German tuon.

VerbEdit

dōn

  1. to do

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit


Scottish GaelicEdit

EtymologyEdit

do + an

Alternative formsEdit

PrepositionEdit

don

  1. to the (singular)
    Chaidh i don bhùth. - She went to the shop.
  2. for the (singular)

Usage notesEdit

  • Without the definite article and in the plural the form do is used.
  • Lenites words beginning with b, c, f, g, m and p.

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Late Latin dom (a courtesy title for monks and abbots), from domnus (master, sir), from Classical Latin dominus, from domus (a house), from Proto-Indo-European *dṓm (a house), from root Proto-Indo-European *demh₂- (to build)

NounEdit

don m (plural dones, feminine doña)

  1. (obsolete) sir, master, lord
  2. A title of respect to a man, prefixed to Christian names
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin donum (a gift), from do (to give), from Proto-Indo-European *deh₃- (to give)

NounEdit

don m (plural dones)

  1. gift, present
  2. gift, talent, knack
See alsoEdit

SwedishEdit

NounEdit

don n

  1. a tool, a means

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


TurkishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Turkic ton, from Proto-Turkic *tōn.

NounEdit

don

  1. underpants

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Turkic toŋ, from Proto-Turkic *tong, *doŋ.

NounEdit

don

  1. frost

ZazakiEdit

NounEdit

don

  1. kind of bread