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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Middle English roten, from Old Norse rotinn (decayed, rotten), past participle of an unrecorded verb related to Old Norse rotna (to rot) and Old English rotian (to rot), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *rutōną (to rot). More at rot.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rotten (comparative rottener or more rotten, superlative rottenest or most rotten)

  1. Of perishable items, overridden with bacteria and other infectious agents.
    If you leave a bin unattended for a few weeks, the rubbish inside will turn rotten.
    • 1596-99?, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act I, scene iii:
      Antonio: Mark you this, Bassanio, / The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose. / An evil soul producing holy witness / Is like a villain with a smiling cheek, / A goodly apple rotten at the heart. / O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!
  2. In a state of decay.
    The floors were damaged and the walls were rotten.
    His mouth stank and his teeth were rotten.
  3. Cruel, mean or immoral.
    That man is a rotten father.
    This rotten policy will create more injustice in this country.
  4. Bad or terrible.
    Why is the weather always rotten in this city?
    It was a rotten idea to take the boat out today.
    She has the flu and feels rotten.

Usage notesEdit

  • Nouns to which “rotten” is often applied: wood, food, egg, meat, fruit, tomato, apple, banana, milk, vegetable, stuff, tooth, smell, person, kid, bastard, scoundrel, weather.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

rotten (comparative more rotten, superlative most rotten)

  1. To an extreme degree.
    That kid is spoilt rotten.
    The girls fancy him something rotten.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch rotten, reformed from earlier roten, from Old Dutch *roton, from Proto-Germanic *rutāną.

VerbEdit

rotten

  1. to rot, to go bad, to decay
InflectionEdit
Inflection of rotten (weak)
infinitive rotten
past singular rotte
past participle gerot
infinitive rotten
gerund rotten n
present tense past tense
1st person singular rot rotte
2nd person sing. (jij) rot rotte
2nd person sing. (u) rot rotte
2nd person sing. (gij) rot rotte
3rd person singular rot rotte
plural rotten rotten
subjunctive sing.1 rotte rotte
subjunctive plur.1 rotten rotten
imperative sing. rot
imperative plur.1 rot
participles rottend gerot
1) Archaic.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

rotten

  1. Plural form of rot

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɔtən/, [ˈʁɔtən], [ˈʁɔtn̩]

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle High German roten, derived from rote (whence modern Rotte), from Old French rote, from Latin rupta.

VerbEdit

rotten (third-person singular simple present rottet, past tense rottete, past participle gerottet, auxiliary haben)

  1. (obsolete) to form into a gang, rout, squad
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle High German roten, roden, from Proto-Germanic *rudōną.

VerbEdit

rotten (third-person singular simple present rottet, past tense rottete, past participle gerottet, auxiliary haben)

  1. (obsolete) Alternative form of roden (to clear woods, to make arable)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle Low German rotten, alteration (perhaps intensivation) of older rōten, from Old Saxon rotōn, from Proto-Germanic *rutōną. Cognate with Dutch rotten, English rot.

VerbEdit

rotten (third-person singular simple present rottet, past tense rottete, past participle gerottet, auxiliary haben)

  1. to rot, to decay
Usage notesEdit
  • As a simplex chiefly with certain adverbs, like vor sich hin. More common in compounds.
Derived termsEdit

ConjugationEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

rotten

  1. Alternative form of roten (to rot)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

rotten m or f

  1. definite masculine singular of rotte

West FrisianEdit

NounEdit

rotten

  1. plural of rôt