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See also: Rot, ROT, rót, rôt, röt, and rot-

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Wikipedia has articles on:
Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English rotten, roten, from Old English rotian (to rot, become corrupted, ulcerate, putrefy), from Proto-Germanic *rutōną (to rot), from Proto-Indo-European *rewd- (to tear). Cognate with West Frisian rotsje (to rot), Dutch rotten (to rot), German verrotten (to rot) and regional rößen (to steep flax), Icelandic rotna (to rot). See rotten.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rot (third-person singular simple present rots, present participle rotting, simple past and past participle rotted)

  1. (intransitive) To suffer decomposition due to biological action, especially by fungi or bacteria.
    • Alexander Pope
      Fixed like a plant on his peculiar spot, / To draw nutrition, propagate, and rot.
  2. (intransitive) To decline in function or utility.
  3. (intransitive) To deteriorate in any way.
    I hope they all rot in prison for what they've done.
    • Macaulay
      Four of the sufferers were left to rot in irons.
    • Thackeray
      Rot, poor bachelor, in your club.
  4. (transitive) To make putrid; to cause to be wholly or partially decomposed by natural processes.
    to rot vegetable fiber
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To spend a long period of time (in an unpleasant place).
    to rot in jail
    to rot in prison
    to rot in Hell
  6. (transitive) To expose, as flax, to a process of maceration, etc., for the purpose of separating the fiber; to ret.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

rot (countable and uncountable, plural rots)

  1. The process of becoming rotten; putrefaction.
  2. Any of several diseases in which breakdown of tissue occurs.
    • Milton
      His cattle must of rot and murrain die.
  3. Verbal nonsense.

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

NounEdit

rot (plural rotte)

  1. rat

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ructus.

NounEdit

rot m (plural rots)

  1. belch

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rot (comparative rotter, superlative rotst)

  1. rotten, spoiled, decayed, putrid
  2. rotten, tedious, unkind, mean

InflectionEdit

Inflection of rot
uninflected rot
inflected rotte
comparative rotter
positive comparative superlative
predicative/adverbial rot rotter het rotst
het rotste
indefinite m./f. sing. rotte rottere rotste
n. sing. rot rotter rotste
plural rotte rottere rotste
definite rotte rottere rotste
partitive rots rotters

NounEdit

rot n (plural rotten, diminutive rotje n)

  1. rot, something rotten, something rotting
  2. (military) a file (of men)

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ructus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rot m (plural rots)

  1. (colloquial) belch, burp

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ruptus.

AdjectiveEdit

rot (feminine rote)

  1. broken

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


GermanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle High German rōt (red, red-haired), from Old High German rōt (red, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós, from *h₁rewdʰ-. Compare Low German root, rod, rot, Dutch rood, English red, West Frisian read, Danish rød.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rot (comparative röter or roter, superlative am rötesten or am rotesten)

  1. red (colour)
  2. (politics) red; pertaining to Marxism in the widest sense; social democratic; socialist; communist
    1. (politics, Germany, in particular) pertaining to the social democratic SPD or the more rigidly socialist Linke
  3. (possibly mildly offensive) red-haired
  4. (historical, possibly offensive) redskin; Native American; Indian

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • rot in Duden online

German Low GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rot

  1. Alternative spelling of root

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

rot n (genitive singular rots, no plural)

  1. unconsciousness, insensibility
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

rot n (genitive singular rots, nominative plural rot)

  1. rot, decay, putrefaction
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

rot

  1. rafsi of rotsu.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds.

NounEdit

rot m, f (definite singular rota or roten, indefinite plural røtter, definite plural røttene)

  1. root (part of a plant normally below ground level)
  2. root (of a tooth)
  3. root (of a hair)
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

rot

  1. imperative of rote

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

From Old Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds. Akin to English root.

NounEdit

rot f (definite singular rota, indefinite plural røter, definite plural røtene)

  1. root (of a plant)
  2. root (of a tooth)
  3. root (of a hair)

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse rót

NounEdit

rot n (definite singular rotet, uncountable)

  1. a mess, untidiness, chaos
    Det er for mykje rot på loftet. Me må rydda.
    The attic is a mess. We have to tidy it up.
    Når me prøver å samarbeida med dei, blir det berre rot.
    When we try working with them, it just turns into chaos.

ReferencesEdit


Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *raudaz (compare Old Saxon rōd, Old English rēad, Old Norse rauðr, Gothic 𐍂𐌰𐌿𐌸𐍃 (rauþs)), from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós, from *h₁rewdʰ-.

AdjectiveEdit

rōt

  1. red

DescendantsEdit


Old SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts.

NounEdit

rōt f

  1. root

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Pennsylvania GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old High German rōt, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz. Compare German rot, Dutch rood, English red.

AdjectiveEdit

rot

  1. red

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish rōt, from Old Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rot c

  1. root; the part of a plant under the surface.
  2. the part of a tooth extending into the bone holding the tooth in place
  3. source; an underlying cause
    Kärleken till pengar är roten till allt ont.
    The love of money is the root of all evil.
  4. (mathematics) of a number n, a positive number which, when raised to a specified power, yields n; the square root is understood if no power is specified
    Kubikroten ur 27 är 3.
    The cube root of 27 is 3.
    Multiplicera med roten ur 2.
    Multiply by root 2.
  5. (mathematics) a zero (of a function).
  6. (mathematics) a designated node in a tree.
  7. (mathematics) curl; a measure on how fast a vector field rotates: it can be described as the cross product of del and a given vectorial field
  8. (computing) root directory
  9. (philology) a word from which another word is derived.

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit


Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English road.

NounEdit

rot

  1. road, street
    • '2003, Mühlhäusler et al., Tok Pisin texts, John Benjamins Publishing Company, page 9:
      Planti liklik rot i stap long ailan hia.
      Many little roads exist on this island.

ReferencesEdit

Tok Pisin texts: from the beginning to the present / edited by Peter Mühlhäusler, Thomas E. Dutton, Suzanne Romaine. / John Benjamins Publishing Company / Copyright 2003 / ISBN 90 272 4718 8 / page 106

This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. This language is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

VilamovianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

rōt f (plural rota)

  1. installment (a kind of payment)