CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (letter name): IPA(key): [ˈxaː]
  • (phoneme): IPA(key): [ˈx]

LetterEdit

Ch (mixed case, lower case ch, upper case CH)

  1. A digraph, the eleventh letter of the Czech alphabet, after H and before I.
    • 2006 November 2, Libor Kult, “S novým trenérem jsme nenašli společnou řeč”, in Hokej.cz[1], retrieved 2015-11-24:
      Chtěl jsem do Chomutova.
      I wanted to go to Chomutov.

Usage notesEdit

Mixed case Ch is usually used in the beginning of a proper name or of a sentence (e. g. in Chrudim).


LatvianEdit

LetterEdit

Ch (mixed case, upper case CH, lower case ch)

  1. a letter used in older, pre-World-War-II Latvian spelling, but now replaced everywhere by H (lower case h).

Usage notesEdit

This letter can still be found in older books, or in books written by the Latvian diaspora prior to the fall of the Soviet Union. It used to represent the sound of IPA symbol /x/, as distinct from /h/; but since these sounds have merged as /x/ in current Latvian pronunciation, <h> (= /x/) is now used in all cases.


SpanishEdit

LetterEdit

Ch (mixed case, upper case CH, lower case ch)

  1. che, the fourth letter of the Spanish alphabet, after C and before D

Usage notesEdit

Since 1994, this letter has been treated as if it were C followed by h for collation purposes only. In 2010, this letter was officially removed by the RAE from the Spanish alphabet.


VietnameseEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [se˧˧ haːt̚˧˦], [t͡ɕəː˨˩], [t͡ɕəː˨˩ ɲɛ˧˨ʔ]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [sej˧˧ haːk̚˦˧˥], [t͡ɕəː˦˩], [t͡ɕəː˦˩ ɲɛ˨˩ʔ]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [sej˧˧ haːk̚˦˥], [cəː˨˩], [cəː˨˩ ɲɛ˨˩˨]
  • Phonetic: xê hát, chờ, chờ nhẹ

LetterEdit

Ch (mixed case, upper case CH, lower case ch)

  1. (dated) Xê hát, traditionally the sixth letter of the Vietnamese alphabet, quốc ngữ, after C but before D.

See alsoEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

LetterEdit

Ch (upper case, lower case ch)

  1. The fourth letter of the Welsh alphabet, called èch and written in the Latin script. It is preceded by C and followed by D.

Usage notesEdit

Like the other Welsh digraphs, Ch is considered a distinct letter of the Welsh alphabet for all purposes, including collation. Thus, Chwilog is alphabetically sorted after Cydweli.

MutationEdit

  • Ch cannot be mutated in Welsh.

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “Ch”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies