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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

See feuar.

NounEdit

fiar (plural fiars)

  1. (Scotland, law) One in whom the property of an estate is vested, subject to the estate of a liferenter.
    • 1816, Walter Scott, The Black Dwarf, 1831, A Complete Edition of the Waverley Novels, Volume 13, page 108,
      I say, since ye hae sae muckle consideration for me, I'se be blithe to accept your kindness; and my mother and me (she's a life-renter, and I am fiar, o' the lands o' Wideopen) would grant you a wadset, or an heritable bond, for the siller, and to pay the annual-rent half-yearly; and Saunders Wyliecoat to draw the bond, and you to be at nae charge wi' the writings.
  2. The price of grain in the counties of Scotland, as legally fixed on an annual basis.
    • 1817, Committee members, Report respecting the Striking of the Fiars of Grain for the Crop of 1816 for the County of Lanark, The Farmers Magazine, Volume 18, page 310,
      It seems to be a practice as improper as it is unnecessary, to strike the fiars in three different qualities of the same species of grain; and it should, in our humble opinion, be discontinued.
    • 1842, Fife Fiars, from 1619 to 1841 Inclusive, page vi,
      It was answered by the Sheriff. 1st, That the Act of Sederunt did not impose any positive injunction on Sheriffs to strike Fiars; that if the Fiars were substantially just, the Court could have no power to reduce them; and that the Act of Sederunt had never been observed in East Lothian; [] .
    • 1852, George Paterson, Historical Account of the Fiars in Scotland, page 7,
      In further confirmation that this is not the date of the origin, it may be stated, that there is very early mention of Commissaries' Fiars, Sir John Connell tracing the commencement of these so far back as the Reformation, when Commissary or Consistorial Courts were established, in place of those of the bishops or their officials; and notice is taken of the Fiars prices of grain in the records of the Commissary Court so far back as 1564—somewhat earlier than the statute above quoted.

Derived termsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for fiar in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Vulgar Latin *fidō, from Latin fīdō, fīdere (to trust).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fiar (first-person singular present fio, past participle fiat)

  1. to sell on credit
  2. (reflexive, fiar-se de) to trust
    Synonym: confiar

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


DalmatianEdit

GalicianEdit

 
Fiando

Etymology 1Edit

From Late Latin fīlāre, from fīlum (thread). Compare Portuguese fiar, Spanish hilar, Italian filare, French filer.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fiar (first-person singular present fío, first-person singular preterite fiei, past participle fiado)

  1. to spin (make yarn)
  2. to string together, put together (words or ideas)
ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Vulgar Latin *fidare, from Latin fīdō, fīdere (to trust).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fiar (first-person singular present fío, first-person singular preterite fiei, past participle fiado)

  1. to guarantee
  2. to sell on credit, give credit
  3. to entrust
  4. to confide
ConjugationEdit
Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • fiar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • fiar” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • fiar” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • fiar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • fiar” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • fiar” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish fiar, from Proto-Celtic *wēros (compare Welsh gŵyr), from Proto-Indo-European *weh₁i-ro-s (turned, twisted) (compare English wire), from *weh₁-y (turn, twist) (compare Old Church Slavonic вити (viti), Latin vieō).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fiar m (genitive singular fiair, nominative plural fiara)

  1. slant, tilt, bias, obliquity
  2. bend, twist; crookedness, perverseness

DeclensionEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fiar

  1. slanting, tilted, oblique, diagonal, crosswise
  2. bent, warped, crooked, perverse

DeclensionEdit

VerbEdit

fiar (present analytic fiarann, future analytic fiarfaidh, verbal noun fiaradh, past participle fiartha)

  1. slant, tilt, veer, turn
  2. bend, twist, distort

ConjugationEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
fiar fhiar bhfiar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ferus (compare French fier).

AdjectiveEdit

fiar m

  1. (Guernsey) pleased

PortugueseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Late Latin fīlāre < Latin fīlum. Compare Spanish hilar, Italian filare, French filer.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fiar (first-person singular present indicative fio, past participle fiado)

  1. to spin (thread)
  2. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of fiar
  3. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of fiar
  4. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of fiar
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of fiar
ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Vulgar Latin *fidare, from Latin fidere, present active infinitive of fidō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fiar (first-person singular present indicative fio, past participle fiado)

  1. (Portugal) to trust
  2. first-person singular (eu) personal infinitive of fiar
  3. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) personal infinitive of fiar
  4. first-person singular (eu) future subjunctive of fiar
  5. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) future subjunctive of fiar
ConjugationEdit

Scottish GaelicEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Irish fiar, from Proto-Celtic *wēros (compare Welsh gŵyr), from Proto-Indo-European *weh₁i-ro-s (turned, twisted) (compare English wire), from *weh₁-y (turn, twist) (compare Old Church Slavonic вити (viti), Latin vieō).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fiar (comparative fiara)

  1. bent, crooked
  2. slanting, oblique
  3. squinting (of an eye)
  4. cunning, sly

VerbEdit

fiar (past dh'fhiar, future fiaraidh, verbal noun fiaradh, past participle fiarte)

  1. bend (become bended)
  2. bend, slant, twist

MutationEdit

Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Lenition
fiar fhiar
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *fidare, from Latin fīdere, present active infinitive of fīdō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fiar (first-person singular present fío, first-person singular preterite fie, past participle fiado)

  1. to guarantee
  2. to sell on credit, give credit, put on the slate
  3. to entrust
  4. to confide
  5. (reflexive, fiarse de) to trust
    Synonym: confiar

ConjugationEdit

  • Rule: stressed í in certain conjugations; monosyllabic infinitives receive no written accent in certain conjugations. This change was put into effect in the 2010 spelling reforms by the RAE, so some other forms are still commonly seen.

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit