Translingual edit

Symbol edit

ty

  1. (international standards) ISO 639-1 language code for Tahitian.

English edit

Interjection edit

ty

  1. (Internet slang, text messaging) Alternative letter-case form of TY.

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): [tə̟i̯]
  • (file)

Noun edit

ty (plural tye)

  1. (poetic, literary) tide
    Synonym: gety

Derived terms edit

Albanian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Albanian *tuu̯an, from earlier *tuu̯ān, from earlier *tuu̯ām, from Proto-Indo-European *tuu̯ēm (*twé, accusative of *túh₂ (you)). Compare Latin te.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ty

  1. (personal) accusative of ti, you (singular)

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Schumacher, Stefan; Matzinger, Joachim (2013) Die Verben des Altalbanischen: Belegwörterbuch, Vorgeschichte und Etymologie (Albanische Forschungen; 33) (in German), Wiesbaden: Otto Harrassowitz, →ISBN, page 216

Cornish edit

Alternative forms edit

  • te (Standard Cornish)

Pronoun edit

ty

  1. you (informal second person singular pronoun)
  2. thou
  3. thee

Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Czech ty, from Proto-Slavic *ty, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *tūˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *túh₂.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ty

  1. (personal) you, thou (second person singular)
    Kdybych byl tebou, udělal bych to samé.If I were you, I would do the same.

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Pronoun edit

ty

  1. inflection of ten:
    1. animate masculine accusative plural
    2. inanimate masculine nominative/accusative plural
    3. feminine nominative/accusative plural

Further reading edit

  • ty in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ty in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989
  • ty in Internetová jazyková příručka

Danish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse þýða (to make friends), Proto-Germanic *þiudijaną, cognate with Gothic 𐌸𐌹𐌿𐌸𐌾𐌰𐌽 (þiuþjan, to bless). It may originally be the same verb as *þiudijaną (to interpret), which is the source of Old Norse þýða (whence Danish tyde) and German deuten.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

ty (imperative ty, present tyr or tyer, past tense tyede, past participle tyet)

  1. to turn to, resort to

Eastern Katu edit

Adjective edit

ty

  1. ancient

Derived terms edit

Guaraní edit

Noun edit

ty

  1. urine

Hungarian edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (phoneme): IPA(key): [ˈc]
  • (letter name): IPA(key): [ˈceː]

Letter edit

ty (lower case, upper case Ty)

  1. The thirty-third letter of the Hungarian alphabet, called tyé and written in the Latin script.

Declension edit

Inflection (stem in long/high vowel, front unrounded harmony)
singular plural
nominative ty ty-k
accusative ty-t ty-ket
dative ty-nek ty-knek
instrumental ty-vel ty-kkel
causal-final ty-ért ty-kért
translative ty-vé ty-kké
terminative ty-ig ty-kig
essive-formal ty-ként ty-kként
essive-modal
inessive ty-ben ty-kben
superessive ty-n ty-ken
adessive ty-nél ty-knél
illative ty-be ty-kbe
sublative ty-re ty-kre
allative ty-hez ty-khez
elative ty-ből ty-kből
delative ty-ről ty-kről
ablative ty-től ty-ktől
non-attributive
possessive - singular
ty-é ty-ké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
ty-éi ty-kéi
Possessive forms of ty
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. ty-m ty-im
2nd person sing. ty-d ty-id
3rd person sing. ty-je ty-i
1st person plural ty-nk ty-ink
2nd person plural ty-tek ty-itek
3rd person plural ty-jük ty-ik

See also edit

Further reading edit

  • ty in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Lower Sorbian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *ty, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *tūˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *túh₂.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ty sg

  1. you (singular, informal)

Declension edit

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Noun edit

ty

  1. Alternative form of teye (chest, enclosure)

Etymology 2 edit

Determiner edit

ty

  1. (chiefly Northern dialectal) Alternative form of þi (thy)

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Old Norse þýða.[1]

Verb edit

ty (present tense tyr, past tense tydde, past participle tytt/tydd, passive infinitive tyast, present participle tyande, imperative ty)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Norse týja.[1]

Verb edit

ty (present tense tyr, past tense tydde, past participle tytt/tydd, passive infinitive tyast, present participle tyande, imperative ty)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.

Etymology 3 edit

From Old Norse tygi (tool).

Noun edit

ty n (definite singular tyet, indefinite plural ty, definite plural tya or tyi)

  1. (pre-2012) alternative form of tøy

References edit

  1. 1.0 1.1 “ty” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams edit

Old Czech edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *ty, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *tūˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *túh₂.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ty (second person)

  1. (personal) second person singular; you

Declension edit

Descendants edit

  • Czech: ty

References edit

Old Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Slavic *ty. First attested in the 13th century.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ty

  1. Singular non-formal second person pronoun thou, you

Declension edit

Descendants edit

  • Masurian: ti
  • Polish: ty
  • Silesian: ty

References edit

Old Tupi edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-Tupi-Guarani *tɨ (liquid, urine), from Proto-Tupian *tˀɨ (liquid, urine). Doublet of y.[1][2]

Cognate with Sateré-Mawé (river), Guaraní ty (urine).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɨ/
  • Rhymes:
  • Hyphenation: ty

Noun edit

ty (possessable)

  1. urine

Noun edit

ty

  1. absolute of y
  2. R2 of y

Adjective edit

ty

  1. R2 of y

References edit

  1. ^ Beatriz Carretta Corrêa da Silva (2010) Mawé/Awetí/Tupí-Guaraní: relações linguísticas e implicações históricas[1] (in Portuguese), Brasília: UnB, archived from the original on 2023-08-19, pages 403–404
  2. ^ Andrey Nikulin (2020) Proto-Macro-Jê: um estudo reconstrutivo[2] (in Portuguese), Brasília: UnB

Further reading edit

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish ty.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ty

  1. you (second person singular pronoun)

Usage notes edit

  • Ty is the T-form; it is used to address friends, family, children, teenagers, and often peers. The V-forms are pan m and pani f.

Declension edit

See also edit

Trivia edit

According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), ty is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 6 times in scientific texts, 0 times in news, 2 times in essays, 250 times in fiction, and 1034 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 1292 times, making it the 31st most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[1]

References edit

  1. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990), “ty”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language] (in Polish), volume 2, Kraków; Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 617

Further reading edit

Silesian edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Polish ty.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈtɨ/
  • Rhymes:
  • Syllabification: ty

Pronoun edit

ty

  1. you singular second person pronoun

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • ty in silling.org

Slovak edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old Slovak ty, from Proto-Slavic *ty.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

ty

  1. you (personal, singular)

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • ty”, in Slovníkový portál Jazykovedného ústavu Ľ. Štúra SAV [Dictionary portal of the Ľ. Štúr Institute of Linguistics, Slovak Academy of Science] (in Slovak), https://slovnik.juls.savba.sk, 2024

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish þy, from Old Norse því.

Pronunciation edit

Conjunction edit

ty

  1. (archaic, poetic, biblical) for (because)
    Synonyms: därför att, eftersom, emedan, för
    Ty riket är dittFor the kingdom is yours

Usage notes edit

ty as well as för always introduces a main clause, while the other given synonyms all introduces secondary clauses. Compare:

  • Hon gick inte och lade sig, ty/för hon var inte trött.
  • Hon gick inte och lade sig, därför att/eftersom/emedan hon inte var trött.

Verb edit

ty (present tyr, preterite tydde, supine tytt, imperative ty)

  1. to cling to, to turn to [someone/something] for protection or comfort.
    När barn blir rädda tyr de sig oftast till sina föräldrar
    When children get scared, they usually turn to their parents for comfort.

Conjugation edit

Further reading edit

Tapayuna edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Northern Jê *ˀcy (seed) < Proto-Cerrado *cym (seed) < Proto-Jê *cym (seed).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

ty

  1. seed

Upper Sorbian edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Slavic *ty, from Proto-Balto-Slavic *tūˀ, from Proto-Indo-European *túh₂.

Pronoun edit

ty

  1. you, thou

Declension edit

Xhosa edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

ty (upper case Ty)

  1. A digraph in Xhosa orthography.

Yola edit

Etymology edit

Perhaps cognate with English tea (a cup or glass of any of these drinks).

Noun edit

ty

  1. drink
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Ty o' letch.
      A drink of small beer.

References edit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 73