EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

VerbEdit

quo

  1. (transitive, obsolete) quoth

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

quo (plural quos)

  1. This term needs a definition. Please help out and add a definition, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.
    • 1886 May 19, Report from the Select Committee of the House of Lords on the Electric Lighting Act (1882) Amendment (No. 1) Bill [H.L.]; the Electric Lighting Act (1882) Amendment (No. 2) Bill [H.L.]; Together with the Proceedings of the Committee, Minutes of Evidence, and Appendix, London: [] Henry Hansard and Son, page 208:
      []; but what is the quo for which they ought to give the quid? you say they ought to give a quid pro quo; what is the quo? []; the quo there was the taking up of the streets? []; did not they give you a pretty handsome quid for the quo there?
    • 1993, Richard Edwards, Rights at Work: Employment Relations in the Post-Union Era, Brookings Institution, →ISBN, page 29:
      Quid pro quo benefits are by nature differentially available to individuals, depending upon the quo—upon what promise has been made or performance provided.
    • 2000, Andrew Stark, Conflict of Interest in American Public Life, →ISBN, pages 163–164:
      Indeed, asymmetry precludes the possibility of pointing to any particular quo that is meant to recompense the quid. If an erstwhile case of criminal bribery bleeds into a lesser violation of the prophylactic gift rules as an identifable[sic] quo moves beyond view, then in similar fashion the quid pro quos we popularly debate descend into tokens of affection and regard as the quos begin to fluctuate wildly in value. If there exists any kind of inequity between quid and quo, then—on this line of argument—the expansive category of “friendship” emerges to account for it, siphoning the situation away from the class of objectionable quid pro quo. The claim officials here make—that for a quid to have a quo there must be some equivalency between the two—draws theoretical sustenance from the objective, exclusionary approach that critics of classical contract law apply to disproportionate exchanges.
    • 2009, George G. Brenkert and Tom L. Beaucham, editor, The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics, Oxford University Press, page 504:
      Corruption, the Court declared in Buckley v. Valeo, involves a quid pro quo: an officeholder doing something in office in return for money or some other favor provided by another individual or entity (for our purposes, a corporation). The problem, however, is that in principle there can be a quid—the money or favor offered by the business to the official—and a quo—the action taken by the official that benefits the business—without any clear evidence of a pro, that is, that the two are connected. [] The “pro,” the connection between quid and quo, might take place only inside the minds of the official and businessperson concerned. [] What this means is that we cannot use the quo itself as indirect evidence for the pro.
    • 2020, John Yoo, Defender in Chief: Donald Trump’s Fight for Presidential Power, New York, N.Y.: All Points Books, St. Martin’s Publishing Group, →ISBN:
      It is hard to pull off a quid pro quo if the holder of the quo doesn’t know about the quid.

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From qua +‎ -o.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

quo (plural qui)

  1. (relative pronoun) which
    Esis tre bona kultelo quo me tranchis per.It was really good knife which I cut with.
  2. (interrogative pronoun) what
    Quo eventis?What (thing) happened?
    (direct question)
    Ka tu povas helpar me decidar quo metar?Can you help me to decide what to wear?
    (indirect question)

Related termsEdit

  • qua (who (person))
  • qui (who (plural))
  • pro quo (why)

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Adverb declined from quī. See also the same meanings in ubī.

AdverbEdit

quō (not comparable)

  1. (interrogative) whither, whereto, where
    ex quosince when
    Quō vādis, domine?
    Where are you going, lord?
  2. (relative / interrogative) To or in which place, whither, where
  3. To what end, for what purpose, wherefore, why
  4. To the end that, in order that, so that, that
    Multum currit, quō validior fīat.
    He runs a lot to become healthier.
    Quo expeditiore re frumentaria utereturin order that he might make use of the looser supplies of provisions
    (Caesar, de Bello Gallico, VII, 11)

(This replaces ut when there is a comparative in the subordinate clause of purpose.)

Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Inflection of quī (who, which).

PronounEdit

quō

  1. ablative masculine/neuter singular of quī

AdjectiveEdit

quō

  1. ablative masculine/neuter singular of quī

Etymology 3Edit

Inflection of quis (who?, what?).

PronounEdit

quō

  1. ablative masculine/feminine/neuter singular of quis

ReferencesEdit

  • quo”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • quo”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • quo in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) where are you going: quo tendis?
    • (ambiguous) since the time that, since (at the beginning of a sentence): ex quo tempore or simply ex quo
    • (ambiguous) Pericles, the greatest man of his day: Pericles, quo nemo tum fuit clarior
    • (ambiguous) how are you getting on: quo loco res tuae sunt?
    • (ambiguous) from this point of view; similarly: quo in genere
    • (ambiguous) by some chance or other: nescio quo casu (with Indic.)
    • (ambiguous) to determine the nature and constitution of the subject under discussion: constituere, quid et quale sit, de quo disputetur
    • (ambiguous) to bring forward a proof of the immortality of the soul: argumentum afferre, quo animos immortales esse demonstratur
    • (ambiguous) it follows from this that..: sequitur (not ex quo seq.) ut
    • (ambiguous) it follows from this that..: ex quo, unde, hinc efficitur ut
    • (ambiguous) the point at issue: id, de quo agitur or id quod cadit in controversiam
    • (ambiguous) to set some one a theme for discussion: ponere alicui, de quo disputet
    • (ambiguous) from this it appears, is apparent: ex quo intellegitur or intellegi potest, debet
    • (ambiguous) from this it appears, is apparent: ex quo perspicuum est

Middle EnglishEdit

PronounEdit

quo

  1. Alternative form of who (who, nominative)

YolaEdit

VerbEdit

quo

  1. Alternative form of co
    • 1867, GLOSSARY OF THE DIALECT OF FORTH AND BARGY:
      Quo hea; Quo shoo; Quo Ich.
      Saith he; Says she; Say I.

ReferencesEdit

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith, page 63