See also: QUA, quá, quà, quả, quạ, and qu'à

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin qua(in the capacity of).

PronunciationEdit

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AdverbEdit

qua ‎(not comparable)

  1. As [a/an]; in the capacity of.
    • 1954: Gilbert Ryle, Dilemmas: The Tarner Lectures, 1953, dilemma vii: Perception, page 99 (The Syndics of the Cambridge University Press)
      As anatomy, physiology and, later, psychology have developed into more or less well-organized sciences, they have necessarily and rightly come to incorporate the study of, among other things, the structures, mechanisms, and functionings of animal and human bodies qua percipient.
    • 1962: Norman Malcolm; Dreaming; chapter nine: “Judgments in Sleep”, page 39{1}; chapter twelve: “The Concept of Dreaming”, page 68{2} (1977 paperback reprint; Routledge & Kegan Paul; ISBN 0‒7100‒3836‒4 (c), 0‒7100‒8434‒X (p))
      {1} For sleep qua sleep has no experiential content: it cannot turn out, as remarked before, that a man was not asleep because he was not having some experience or other.
      {2} I am denying that a dream qua dream is a seeming, appearance or ‘semblance of reality’.
    • 2003: Roy Porter, Flesh in the Age of Reason, page 458 (Penguin, 2004)
      It was qua poet that Byron resurrected the exploded and discarded immortal Christian soul by bodying it forth through the notion of soul conceived as poetic imagination.
    • 2005: Ulfelder, Jay.Collective Action and the Breakdown of Authoritarian Regimes. International Political Science Review, 26(3), p318. Retrieved 1615 240810 from http://www.jstor.org.ezproxy1.library.usyd.edu.au/stable/pdfplus/30039035.pdf?acceptTC=true.
      "In essence, military regimes are autocracies in which the military qua organization performs many of the functions performed by the ruling party in single-party regimes."
    • 2009: Ken Levy, Killing, Letting Die, and the Case for Mildly Punishing Bad Samaritanism, Georgia Law Review, p. 24.
      Blame qua attitude is the feeling or belief that an individual has committed a wrongdoing, usually a wrongful action and/or harm, and can be reasonably expected not to have committed this wrongdoing. Blame qua practice is the public expression of this attitude – usually by means of censure (written or verbal criticism) or punishment. Generally, the morally worse the wrongdoing, the more severe the censure/punishment.

TranslationsEdit

PrepositionEdit

qua

  1. in the capacity of

AnagramsEdit


Classical NahuatlEdit

VerbEdit

qua

  1. Alternative spelling of cua

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /kvaː/, [kʰvæːˀ]

ConjunctionEdit

qua

  1. as, qua (in the capacity of)
  2. (as a preposition) by virtue of (because of)

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

qua

  1. regarding, concerning, in terms of
    Qua gezondheid ben ik helemaal in orde.
    In terms of health, I'm perfectly fine.

SynonymsEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French qui, que, Italian che, Spanish que, ultimately from Latin quī / quid.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

qua ‎(plural qui)

  1. (relative pronoun) which
    Esis tre jentila homo qua helpis ni.‎ ― It was a nice man who helped us.
  2. (interrogative pronoun) who
    Qua esas ita kerlo?‎ ― Who is that guy? (direct question)
    Me ne konocas qua ita esas.‎ ― I don't know who that is. (indirect question)

DeterminerEdit

qua

  1. (interrogative determiner) what
    Qua kamizo vu portos?‎ ― What shirt are you going to wear?

Derived termsEdit

  • quo(what (thing))
  • qui(who (plural))
  • pro quo(why)

See alsoEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *(ec)cu hac, from Latin eccum + hac.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

qua

  1. here (relatively close to the speaker)

See alsoEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Adverb declined from quī.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

quā ‎(not comparable)

  1. On which side, at or in which place, in what direction, where, by what way (qua...ea...)
  2. as; in the capacity or character of
  3. In so far as
    ens qua ens ("being as being")
  4. In what way, how, by what method; to what degree or extent

Etymology 2Edit

Inflection of quī(who, which).

PronounEdit

quā

  1. ablative feminine singular of quī

Etymology 3Edit

Inflection of quis(who?, what?).

PronounEdit

quā

  1. ablative feminine singular of quis

ReferencesEdit

  • qua in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • qua in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette, s.v.qua”.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) how old are you: qua aetate es?
    • (ambiguous) moral science; ethics: philosophia, in qua de bonis rebus et malis, deque hominum vita et moribus disputatur
    • (ambiguous) the connection of thought: ratio, qua sententiae inter se excipiunt.
    • (ambiguous) to let those present fix any subject they like for discussion: ponere iubere, qua de re quis audire velit (Fin. 2. 1. 1)
    • (ambiguous) the question at issue: res, de qua nunc quaerimus, quaeritur

Min NanEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

The suffix has been used since around the 17th and 18th century. It is most likely an early attempt at Romanizing the Min Nan for (POJ: koaⁿ) official. Since "hong" () merchants were technically officials of the lowest (9th) rank, the suffix "qua" was added to their names in honour of their positions in the Qing government.

SuffixEdit

qua ‎(poj koaⁿ, traditional and simplified )

  1. official

Usage notesEdit

  • Formerly added to names of hong merchants (i.e. "Powqua," "Chinqua").

See alsoEdit


RomanschEdit

AdverbEdit

qua

  1. here

VietnameseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Sino-Vietnamese word from (“pass”)

PronunciationEdit

PrepositionEdit

qua

  1. through, across, by

AdjectiveEdit

qua

  1. last

VerbEdit

qua

  1. (intransitive) To be gone.
  2. (intransitive) To cross.

Derived termsEdit