EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Abbreviation of simultaneous.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

simul (plural simuls)

  1. (gaming) A simultaneous exhibition: one player, typically very strong, plays several games at the same time against different opponents, typically weaker.
    • 1969, Anthony Glyn, The Dragon Variation, p96
      We're not just starting with Round 1. We're kicking off with a simul. Four simuls to be exact.
    • 1985, Daryl Lane, William Vernon, & David Carson, The Sound of Wonder, p80
      He could have organized a simul with a rat without blinking an eye.
    • 2003, J.C. Hallman, The Chess Artist, p275
      I saw Glenn wrapping up his speech, and told Baynes to come back that evening for the simul.

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

sima (smooth) +‎ -ul (verb-forming suffix)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ ˈʃimul]
  • Hyphenation: si‧mul
  • Rhymes: -ul

VerbEdit

simul

  1. (intransitive, of a surface, material) to become smooth
  2. (intransitive, of clothing, hair, skin) to fit something tight
  3. (intransitive) to snuggle up, cuddle up, to cling (to someone: -hoz/-hez/-höz)
  4. (intransitive, figurative) to conform, accommodate, adapt to, fit in somewhere

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

Further readingEdit

  • simul in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’An Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old Latin neuter of similis (with u before l-pinguis).

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

simul (not comparable)

  1. At the same time; simultaneously.
  2. As soon as.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

NounEdit

simul f (genitive simlar)

  1. (poetic) a hag, witch

ReferencesEdit

  • simul in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press