idem

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin idem ‎(the same).

AdjectiveEdit

idem ‎(not comparable)

  1. The same.

Derived termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • Used almost exclusively in footnotes of academic or scholarly papers, especially those of the legal profession, to indicate that the source referred to in a footnote is the same as the source in the preceding footnote; usually abbreviated when so used.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

idem

  1. idem, ditto

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdverbEdit

idem

  1. idem, likewise

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈidem/
  • Hyphenation: ì‧dem

AdverbEdit

idem

  1. ditto, and so, likewise, also

PronounEdit

idem

  1. ditto, the same

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From pronominal stem i + -dem (demonstrative ending). Confer Latin īs.

DeterminerEdit

īdem m, eadem f, idem n

  1. the same (usually with ablative)
    • 29 bc. Vergil. Georgics, III
      amor omnibvs idem
      Sex is the same for all of them [viz., every form of man, beast, aquatic or winged life, and livestock]

InflectionEdit

Irregular declension. Similar to the declension of is, ea, id.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative īdem eadem idem īdem eaedem eadem
genitive eiusdem eiusdem eiusdem eōrundem eārundem eōrundem
dative eīdem eīdem eīdem eīsdem, īsdem eīsdem, īsdem eīsdem, īsdem
accusative eundem eandem idem eōsdem eāsdem eadem
ablative eōdem eādem eōdem eīsdem, īsdem eīsdem, īsdem eīsdem, īsdem

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ idem” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.

PortugueseEdit

PronounEdit

idem

  1. (demonstrative) the aforesaid; ditto

Serbo-CroatianEdit

VerbEdit

idem (Cyrillic spelling идем)

  1. first-person singular present tense form of ići.
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