See also: Idem, IDEM, and ídem

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English idem, borrowed from Latin idem (the same).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪ.dɛm/, /ˈaɪ.dɛm/

AdjectiveEdit

idem (not comparable)

  1. The same.

Usage notesEdit

Used almost exclusively in footnotes of academic or scholarly papers, especially those of the legal profession, to indicate that the source or author referred to in a footnote is the same as in the preceding footnote; usually abbreviated when so used.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdverbEdit

idem

  1. idem, ditto

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin idem.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

idem

  1. idem, likewise
    Synonym: id.
    • 1968, Serge Gainsbourg (music), “Requiem pour un con”, performed by Serge Gainsbourg:
      Pour moi c'est idem / Que ça te plaise ou non / J'te l'rejoue quand même / Pauvre con
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    pour moi c'est idemit's all the same to me

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

idem

  1. ditto, and so, likewise, also

PronounEdit

idem

  1. ditto, the same

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ idem in Luciano Canepari, Dizionario di Pronuncia Italiana (DiPI)

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *izdim; equivalent to is (he) + Proto-Italic *-im (emphatic marker) (whence Sabellic *-om, Oscan 𐌝𐌔𐌝𐌃𐌖𐌌 (ísídum), 𐌄𐌔𐌝𐌃𐌖𐌌 (esídum)), from Proto-Indo-European *im (whence also Old Latin im, em), accusative singular of *éy (so both parts are from the same source). The s was lost and the i lengthened by compensatory lengthening.[2]

When the ablative cases eōd, eād became , , the true forms eōd-em, eād-em were interpreted as eō-dem, eā-dem. The neuter nominative singular id-em is natural and gives earlier emem (= later eundem). The new marker -dem then served to create totidem, tantumdem, ibīdem, etc. Compare tam-en with its later doublet: tan-dem (← *tam-dem).

PronunciationEdit

DeterminerEdit

īdem (feminine eadem, neuter idem); demonstrative pronoun (with m optionally → n in compounds) with an indeclinable portion

  1. the same
    • 29 bc. Virgil. Georgics, III
      amor omnibus īdem
      Love is the same for all

DeclensionEdit

Irregular declension. Similar to the declension of is, ea, id. Demonstrative pronoun (with m optionally → n in compounds) with an indeclinable portion.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
Nominative īdem eadem idem īdem1 eaedem eadem
Genitive eiusdem eōrundem
eōrumdem
eārundem
eārumdem
eōrundem
eōrumdem
Dative eidem2
ēīdem
īsdem1
iīsdem
eīsdem
Accusative eundem
eumdem
eandem
eamdem
idem eōsdem eāsdem eadem
Ablative eōdem eādem eōdem īsdem1
iīsdem
eīsdem

1The nom./dat./abl. plural forms regularly developed into a monosyllable /iː(s)/, with later remodelling - compare the etymology of deus. This /iː/ was normally spelled as EI during and as II after the Republic; a disyllabic , spelled II, Iꟾ, apears in Silver Age poetry, while disyllabic eīs is only post-Classical. Other spellings include EEI(S), EIEI(S), IEI(S).
2The dat. singular is found spelled EIEI (here represented as ēī) and scanned as two longs in Plautus, but also as a monosyllable. The latter is its normal scansion in Classical. Other spellings include EEI, IEI.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • idem in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • idem in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • idem in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to hold the same views: idem sentire (opp. dissentire ab aliquo)
    • to agree with a person: consentire, idem sentire cum aliquo
    • to have the same meaning: idem valere, significare, declarare
    • synonyms: vocabula idem fere declarantia
    • to have the same political opinions: idem de re publica sentire
  • Sihler, Andrew L. (1995) New Comparative Grammar of Greek and Latin, Oxford, New York: Oxford University Press, →ISBN
  1. ^ idem in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  2. ^ De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “-dem”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 166

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

idem

  1. (demonstrative) idem, ditto (the aforesaid, the same)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

VerbEdit

idem (Cyrillic spelling идем)

  1. first-person singular present of ići