English edit

Etymology edit

From Latin aliter (otherwise), from alius (other).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

aliter (not comparable)

  1. otherwise

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

From a- +‎ lit +‎ -er.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

aliter

  1. (reflexive) to be bedridden
  2. (transitive) to cause to become bedridden

Conjugation edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Latin edit

Alternative forms edit

  • alter (Late Latin, Vulgate)

Etymology edit

Adverb from alius (other).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

aliter (not comparable)

  1. otherwise
    sin aliter/minus/secusotherwise, if not
  2. differently, wrongly, poorly
    aliter quam ego velimIn a manner different from what I want
  3. badly, negatively
  4. mis-
    aliter exceptummisunderstood

Related terms edit

References edit

  • aliter”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • aliter”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • Enrico Olivetti. Dizionario Latino
  • aliter in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • this is quite another matter: hoc longe aliter, secus est
    • the result has surprised me; I was not prepared for this development: res aliter cecidit ac putaveram
    • to think one thing, say another; to conceal one's opinions: aliter sentire ac loqui (aliud sentire, aliud loqui)
    • the matter stands so (otherwise): res ita (aliter) se habet
  • Dizionario Latino, Olivetti