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See also: sublimé

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪm

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English sublimen, borrowed from Old French sublimer, from Latin sublimō (to raise on high; to sublimate (in Medieval Latin)).

VerbEdit

sublime (third-person singular simple present sublimes, present participle subliming, simple past and past participle sublimed)

  1. (chemistry, physics, transitive, intransitive) To sublimate.
  2. (transitive) To raise on high.
    • (Can we date this quote?) E. P. Whipple
      a soul sublimed by an idea above the region of vanity and conceit
  3. (transitive) To exalt; to heighten; to improve; to purify.
    Synonym: sublimate (archaic)
    • (Can we date this quote?) Alexander Pope
      The sun [] / Which not alone the southern wit sublimes, / But ripens spirits in cold, northern climes
  4. (transitive) To dignify; to ennoble.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Jeremy Taylor
      An ordinary gift cannot sublime a person to a supernatural employment.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French sublime, from Latin sublīmis (high), from sub- (up to, upwards) + a root of uncertain affiliation often identified with Latin līmis, ablative singular of līmus (oblique) or līmen (threshold, entrance, lintel)

AdjectiveEdit

sublime (comparative sublimer, superlative sublimest)

  1. Noble and majestic.
  2. Impressive and awe-inspiring, yet simple.
    sublime scenery
    a sublime deed
    • (Can we date this quote?) Matthew Prior
      Easy in words thy style, in sense sublime.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
      Know how sublime a thing it is / To suffer and be strong.
    • 1993, Richard Klein, Cigarettes are sublime, London: Picador, published 1995, →ISBN, page 62:
      Cigarettes are poison and they taste bad; they are not exactly beautiful, they are exactly sublime.
  3. (obsolete) Lifted up; high in place; exalted aloft; uplifted; lofty.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Dryden
      Sublime on these a tower of steel is reared.
  4. (obsolete) Elevated by joy; elated.
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      Their hearts were jocund and sublime, / Drunk with idolatry, drunk with wine.
  5. Lofty of mien; haughty; proud.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Edmund Spenser
      countenance sublime and insolent
    • (Can we date this quote?) John Milton
      His fair, large front and eye sublime declared / Absolute rule.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

sublime (plural sublimes)

  1. Something sublime.
TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sublime

  1. definite of sublim
  2. plural of sublim

FrenchEdit

GermanEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sublime

  1. inflected form of sublim

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin sublimis.

AdjectiveEdit

sublime (masculine and feminine plural sublimi)

  1. sublime

Related termsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sublīme

  1. vocative masculine singular of sublīmus

ReferencesEdit

  • sublime in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • sublime in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • sublime in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meissner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) to fly aloft; to be carried into the sky: sublimem or sublime (not in sublime or sublimiter) ferri, abire

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin sublīmus.

AdjectiveEdit

sublime m or f (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime (noble, majestic, magnificent, etc.)

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin sublīmis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

sublime m or f (plural sublimes, comparable)

  1. sublime

NounEdit

sublime m, f (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime

VerbEdit

sublime

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of sublimar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of sublimar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of sublimar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of sublimar

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin sublimis.

AdjectiveEdit

sublime (plural sublimes)

  1. sublime

VerbEdit

sublime

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of sublimar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of sublimar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of sublimar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of sublimar.