See also: Jag and JAG

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • enPR: jăg, IPA(key): /d͡ʒæɡ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -æɡ

Etymology 1 edit

The noun is from late Middle English jagge, the verb is from jaggen.

Noun edit

jag (plural jags)

  1. A sharp projection.
    • 1659, T[itus] Livius [i.e., Livy], “(please specify the book number)”, in Philemon Holland, transl., The Romane Historie [], London: [] W. Hunt, for George Sawbridge, [], →OCLC:
      garments thus beset with long jagges and pursles
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner[1], lines 323–7:
      The thick black cloud was cleft, and still / The Moon was at its side; / Like waters shot from some high crag, / The lightning fell with never a jag, / A river steep and wide.
    • 1909, Arthur Symons, London: A Book of Aspects, self-published, page 3:
      The especial beauty of London is the Thames, and the Thames is so wonderful because the mist is always changing its shapes and colours, always making its light mysterious, and building palaces of cloud out of mere Parliament Houses with their jags and turrets.
    • 1956, C. S. Lewis, chapter 16, in The Last Battle, Collins, published 1998:
      Even if you hadn’t been drowned, you would have been smashed to pieces by the terrible weight of water against the countless jags of rock.
  2. A part broken off; a fragment.
    • 1693, John Hacket, Scrinia Reserata:
      some Jaggs will ſuffice to be recited
    • 1855, Walt Whitman, “Song of Myself”, in Leaves of Grass, page 56:
      I depart as air .... I shake my white locks at the runway sun, / I effuse my flesh in eddies and drift it in lacy jags.
  3. A flap, a tear in a clothing
  4. (botany) A cleft or division.
  5. (Scotland) A medical injection, a jab.
  6. (Western Pennsylvania, dialectal) A thorn from a bush (see jaggerbush).
  7. (Western Pennsylvania, dialectal, derogatory) Ellipsis of jagoff.: An irritating, inept, or repugnant person.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Verb edit

jag (third-person singular simple present jags, present participle jagging, simple past and past participle jagged)

  1. To cut unevenly.
  2. (Western Pennsylvania) To tease.
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

Circa 1597; originally "load of broom or furze", variant of British English dialectal chag (tree branch; branch of broom or furze), from Old English ċeacga (broom, furze), from Proto-Germanic *kagô (compare dialectal German Kag (stump, cabbage, stalk), Swedish dialect kage (stumps), Norwegian dialect kage (low bush), of unknown origin.

Noun edit

jag (plural jags)

  1. Enough liquor to make a person noticeably drunk; a skinful.
  2. A binge or period of overindulgence; a spree.
    • 1919 August, P. G. Wodehouse, “Prohibition and the Drama”, in Vanity Fair, page 21:
      Consider, the pessimists argue, the vast number of plays which it is only possible to sit through with the assistance of what Ella Wheeler Wilcox would call a mild jag.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin, published 2011, page 88:
      ‘People who spend their money for second-hand sex jags are as nervous as dowagers who can't find the rest-room.’
  3. A fit, spell, outburst.
    • 1985, Peter De Vries, chapter 9, in The Prick of Noon, Penguin, page 165:
      Of course she did not lose her sense of humor (not necessarily to be confused with her laughing fits, which are crying jags turned inside out according to the shrinks).
    • 1997, Don DeLillo, Underworld[2], Simon & Schuster, published 2007, Part 4, Chapter 1, p. 396:
      Miles had a cold, he always had a cold, it went unnoticed, went without saying, he had coughing jags and slightly woozy eyes, completely unremarked by people who knew him []
  4. A one-horse cart load, or, in modern times, a truck load, of hay or wood.
  5. (Scotland, archaic) A leather bag or wallet; (in the plural) saddlebags.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Afrikaans edit

Etymology edit

From Dutch jacht.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

jag (plural jagte)

  1. hunt, pursuit
  2. yacht

Verb edit

jag (present jag, present participle jagtende, past participle gejag)

  1. to hunt

Related terms edit

Dalmatian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun edit

jag

  1. needle

References edit

  • Bartoli, Matteo (1906) Il Dalmatico: Resti di un’antica lingua romanza parlata da Veglia a Ragusa e sua collocazione nella Romània appenino-balcanica (in Italian), Rome: Istituto della Enciclopedia Italiana, published 2000

Danish edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

jag n (singular definite jaget, plural indefinite jag)

  1. hurry, rush
  2. twinge, (a sudden sharp pain; a darting local pain of momentary continuance; as, a twinge in the arm or side)

Inflection edit

Verb edit

jag

  1. imperative of jage

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

jag

  1. singular imperative of jagen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of jagen

Livonian edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Proto-Finnic *jako.

Noun edit

jag

  1. part

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

jag

  1. imperative of jage

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Verb edit

jag

  1. imperative of jaga

Romani edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Sauraseni Prakrit 𑀅𑀕𑁆𑀕𑀺 (aggi), from Ashokan Prakrit 𑀅𑀕𑀺 (agi), from Sanskrit अग्नि (agni, fire), from Proto-Indo-Iranian *Hagnís, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁n̥gʷnis. Cognate with Hindi आग (āg), Nepali आगो (āgo), Gujarati આગ (āga), and Punjabi ਅੱਗ (agga).

Noun edit

jag f inan (nominative plural jaga)

  1. fire

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Kalo Finnish Romani: jang

References edit

  • Turner, Ralph Lilley (1969–1985), “agní1”, in A Comparative Dictionary of the Indo-Aryan Languages, London: Oxford University Press, page 3
  • Boretzky, Norbert; Igla, Birgit (1994), “jag”, in Wörterbuch Romani-Deutsch-Englisch für den südosteuropäischen Raum : mit einer Grammatik der Dialektvarianten [Romani-German-English dictionary for the Southern European region] (in German), Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz Verlag, →ISBN, page 127
  • Marcel Courthiade (2009), “i/e jag, -a- ʒ. -a, -en-”, in Melinda Rézműves, editor, Morri angluni rromane ćhibǎqi evroputni lavustik = Első rromani nyelvű európai szótáram : cigány, magyar, angol, francia, spanyol, német, ukrán, román, horvát, szlovák, görög [My First European-Romani Dictionary: Romani, Hungarian, English, French, Spanish, German, Ukrainian, Romanian, Croatian, Slovak, Greek] (in Hungarian; English), Budapest: Fővárosi Onkormányzat Cigány Ház--Romano Kher, →ISBN, page 179
  • Yūsuke Sumi (2018), “jag”, in ニューエクスプレス ロマ(ジプシー)語 [New Express Romani (Gypsy)] (in Japanese), Tokyo: Hakusuisha, →ISBN, pages 58-59

Swedish edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old Swedish iak, jæk, from Old Norse jak (compare Old West Norse ek), from Proto-Norse ᛖᚲ (ek), from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

jag

  1. I
    Jag läser en bok.
    I'm reading a book.
    Bara du och jag.
    Just you and I.
    • 1981, X Models (lyrics and music), “Två av oss [Two of us]”:
      Det finns bara en av mig och det är jag. Det finns bara en av dig och det är du. Det finns bara två av oss, och det är vi.
      There is only one of me and that is I. There is only one of you [object] and that is you [subject]. There are only two of us, and that is us [we – subject]. [Swedish has some of the same subject/object fuzziness as English, but a standalone "Det är <pronoun>" idiomatically (through intuition rather than being taught) uses the subject form]

Declension edit

Noun edit

jag n

  1. (psychology) I, self

Declension edit

Declension of jag 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative jag jaget
Genitive jags jagets

Related terms edit

References edit

Yabong edit

Noun edit

jag

  1. water

Further reading edit

  • J. Bullock, R. Gray, H. Paris, D. Pfantz, D. Richardson, A Sociolinguistic Survey of the Yabong, Migum, Nekgini, and Neko (2016)

Zaniza Zapotec edit

Noun edit

jag

  1. tree