Open main menu

Wiktionary β

See also: Jag and JAG

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

The noun is from late Middle English jagge, the verb is from jaggen.

NounEdit

jag (plural jags)

  1. A sharp projection.
    • Holland
      garments thus beset with long jags
    • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, lines 323-7, [1]
      The thick black cloud was cleft, and still / The Moon was at its side; / Like waters shot from some high crag, / The lightning fell with never a jag, / A river steep and wide.
    • 1909, Arthur Symons, London: A Book of Aspects, self-published, p. 3, [2]
      The especial beauty of London is the Thames, and the Thames is so wonderful because the mist is always changing its shapes and colours, always making its light mysterious, and building palaces of cloud out of mere Parliament Houses with their jags and turrets.
    • 1956, C. S. Lewis, The Last Battle, Collins, 1998, Chapter 16,
      Even if you hadn’t been drowned, you would have been smashed to pieces by the terrible weight of water against the countless jags of rock.
  2. A part broken off; a fragment.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hacket to this entry?)
    • 1852, Walt Whitman, "Song of Myself" section 52 in Leaves of Grass, New York: Modern Library, 1921, p. 77, [3]
      I depart as air, I shake my white locks at the runway sun, / I effuse my flesh in eddies, and drift it in lacy jags.
  3. (botany) A cleft or division.
  4. (Scotland) A medical injection.
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

jag (third-person singular simple present jags, present participle jagging, simple past and past participle jagged)

  1. To cut unevenly.
  2. (Pittsburgh) To tease.

Etymology 2Edit

Circa 1597; originally "load of broom or furze", variant of British English dialectal chag (tree branch; branch of broom or furze), from Old English ċeacga (broom, furze), from Proto-Germanic *kagô (compare dialectal German Kag (stump, cabbage, stalk), Swedish dialect kage (stumps), Norwegian dialect kage (low bush), of unknown origin.

NounEdit

jag (plural jags)

  1. Enough liquor to make a person noticeably drunk; a skinful.
  2. A binge or period of overindulgence; a spree.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin 2011, page 88:
      ‘People who spend their money for second-hand sex jags are as nervous as dowagers who can't find the rest-room.’
  3. A fit, spell, outburst.
    • 1985, Peter De Vries, The Prick of Noon, Penguin, Chapter 9, p. 165,
      Of course she did not lose her sense of humor (not necessarily to be confused with her laughing fits, which are crying jags turned inside out according to the shrinks).
    • 1997, Don DeLillo, Underworld, Simon & Schuster, 2007, Part 4, Chapter 1, p. 396, [4]
      Miles had a cold, he always had a cold, it went unnoticed, went without saying, he had coughing jags and slightly woozy eyes, completely unremarked by people who knew him []
  4. A one-horse cart load, or, in modern times, a truck load, of hay or wood.
  5. (Scotland, archaic) A leather bag or wallet; (in the plural) saddlebags.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jag n (singular definite jaget, plural indefinite jag)

  1. hurry, rush
  2. twinge, (a sudden sharp pain; a darting local pain of momentary continuance; as, a twinge in the arm or side)

InflectionEdit

VerbEdit

jag

  1. imperative of jage

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

jag

  1. Imperative singular of jagen.
  2. (colloquial) First-person singular present of jagen.

LivonianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *jako.

NounEdit

jag

  1. part

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

jag

  1. rafsi of jalge.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

jag

  1. imperative of jage

RomaniEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit अग्नि (agní, fire), from Proto-Indo-Iranian *Hagnís, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁n̥gʷnis. Cognate with Hindi आग (āg), Nepali आगो (āgō), Gujarati આગ (āg), and Punjabi ਅੱਗ (agg).

NounEdit

jag f (plural jaga)

  1. fire

SwedishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish iak, jæk, from Old Norse jak (compare Old West Norse ek), from Proto-Norse ᛖᚲ (ek), from Proto-Germanic *ek, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

jag

  1. I
    Jag läser en bok.
    I'm reading a book.
    Bara du och jag.
    Just you and me.

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

jag n

  1. (psychology) I, self

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


YabongEdit

NounEdit

jag

  1. water

Further readingEdit

  • J. Bullock, R. Gray, H. Paris, D. Pfantz, D. Richardson, A Sociolinguistic Survey of the Yabong, Migum, Nekgini, and Neko (2016)