English

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Portuguese ama (female nurse), from Medieval Latin amma (wet nurse, amma), perhaps an alteration of mamma, of imitative origin, or from Ancient Greek.

Noun

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ama (plural amas)

  1. Alternative spelling of amah
    • 1910, Mary F. Roulet, The Spaniard at Home, page 14:
      Not only does the baby have a jewel then, or some handsome gift, but his ama (nurse) is remembered with a bright gold doubloon (sixteen dollars).
    • 2007, Ondina E. González, Bianca Premo, Raising an Empire, page 143:
      Again as with Juan, shortly after the religious rite the children would be transferred to the care of wet nurses, or amas, who would take them into their individual homes.
    • 2013, Maria Aurora Couto, Filomena's Journey:
      It was rumoured that she had been his ama, the wet nurse who then became part of the family, taking charge so effectively that she ruled the household.
Translations
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Etymology 2

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From Japanese あま.

Noun

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ama (plural amas)

  1. A traditional Japanese pearl diver, typically female.

Etymology 3

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From Polynesian.

Noun

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ama (plural amas)

  1. (nautical) The float on the outrigger of a proa or trimaran.
Translations
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Etymology 4

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From Sanskrit अम (ama, disease).

Noun

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ama (countable and uncountable, plural amas)

  1. (Ayurveda) A toxic byproduct of improper or incomplete digestion.

Etymology 5

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Unknown.

Noun

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ama (plural amas)

  1. Fabric made from the hair of a camel or goat.
Translations
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Etymology 6

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From Hokkien 阿媽阿妈 (a-má, paternal grandmother).

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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ama (plural amas)

  1. (Philippines, Chinese Filipino, colloquial) paternal grandmother; paternal grandma
    • 2012, Andrew Drilon, “Two Women Worth Watching”, in Charles Tan, editor, Lauriat: A Filipino-Chinese Speculative Fiction Anthology[1], Maple Shade, New Jersey: Lethe Press, Inc., page 8:
      "Perhaps," her grandmother had said. She was nearing death at that point, Mia's ama. Her body was wracked with arthritis, rheumatism, Parkinson's, osteoporosis and more. The maids said she was crazy with pain, and perhaps too far gone to even think properly.
  2. (Philippines, Chinese Filipino, colloquial) term of address for one's paternal grandmother
    • 2017, Ari C. Dy, “Introduction”, in Chinese Buddhism in Catholic Philippines: Syncretism as Identity[2], Anvil Publishing, Inc.:
      There would always be some food offerrings there, and every morning, Amma would burn some incense. More elaborate offerings were made on the anniversaries of his birth and death, and the Chinese festivals for the dead such as Qingming in April and the Hungry Ghosts on the seventh lunar month.
Coordinate terms
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Etymology 7

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Initialism.

Prepositional phrase

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ama

  1. Alternative form of AMA (against medical advice)

Anagrams

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Afar

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /aˈma/ [ʔʌˈmʌ]
  • Hyphenation: a‧ma

Determiner

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amá

  1. this, that, these, those (masculine; near the spoken to)

See also

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References

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  • E. M. Parker, R. J. Hayward (1985) “ama”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN
  • Mohamed Hassan Kamil (2015) L’afar: description grammaticale d’une langue couchitique (Djibouti, Erythrée et Ethiopie)[3], Paris: Université Sorbonne Paris Cité (doctoral thesis)

Aklanon

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax.

Noun

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ama

  1. father

Albanian

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Ottoman Turkish اما (ammâ).

Pronunciation

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Conjunction

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ama

  1. but, however
    Synonyms: megjithatë, mirëpo, por

Alladian

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Noun

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ama

  1. village

References

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  • Marc Augé, Le rivage alladian: organisation et évolution des villages alladian

Amis

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Noun

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ama

  1. grandmother

References

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Asoa

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Etymology

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Compare Mangbetu àmà.

Pronoun

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ama

  1. we

Further reading

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Basque

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Etymology

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Nursery-word, first attested in the 15th century.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ama anim

  1. mother
  2. origin

Declension

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Derived terms

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Further reading

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  • ama”, in Euskaltzaindiaren Hiztegia [Dictionary of the Basque Academy], Euskaltzaindia
  • ama”, in Orotariko Euskal Hiztegia [General Basque Dictionary], Euskaltzaindia, 1987–2005

Bikol Central

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ʔaˈmaʔ/ [ʔaˈmaʔ]
  • Hyphenation: a‧ma
  • Audio:(file)

Noun

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amâ (Basahan spelling ᜀᜋ)

  1. father
    Synonyms: papa, tatay, papay

Bolinao

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Noun

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ama

  1. father

Catalan

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Late Latin amma, q.v.

Noun

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ama f (plural ames)

  1. wet nurse
    Synonym: dida
  2. mistress
    Synonym: mestressa
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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ama

  1. inflection of amar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

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  • “ama” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Cebuano

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax.

Noun

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ama

  1. (obsolete) a male parent; a father
    Synonyms: amahan, papa, tatay

Chayuco Mixtec

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Etymology

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From Proto-Mixtec *awą.

Adverb

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ama

  1. (interrogative) when

Conjunction

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ama

  1. when

References

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  • Pensinger, Brenda J. (1974) Diccionario mixteco-español, español-mixteco (Serie de vocabularios y diccionarios indígenas “Mariano Silva y Aceves”; 18)‎[5] (in Spanish), México, D.F.: El Instituto Lingüístico de Verano en coordinación con la Secretaría de Educación Pública a través de la Dirección General de Educación Extraescolar en el Medio Indígena, pages 3, 86

Domari

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Etymology

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Ultimately from Sanskrit अस्मे (asmé) (locative of वयम् (vayam, we)), from Proto-Indo-Iranian *asmáy, from Proto-Indo-European *n̥smé. Cognate with Hindi हम (ham), Urdu ہَم (ham), Punjabi ਅਸੀਂ (asī̃), Marathi आम्ही (āmhī), Konkani आमि (āmi), Assamese আমি (ami).

Pronoun

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ama (plural eme)

  1. I; first-person singular pronoun

References

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  • Matras, Yaron (2012) A Grammar of Domari (Mouton Grammar Library)‎[6], Walter de Gruyter, →ISBN

Eastern Bontoc

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Noun

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ama

  1. father

Eastern Huasteca Nahuatl

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Adverb

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ama

  1. now

Esperanto

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Etymology

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ami +‎ -a

Pronunciation

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Adjective

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ama (accusative singular aman, plural amaj, accusative plural amajn)

  1. loving, with love, relating to or characterized by love
    ama rememoro / sento.
    loving memory / feeling of love.
    • (Can we date this quote?), Heinrich August Luyken, Stranga Heredaĵo, Ĉapitro 3,
      Per amaj, kunsentaj vortoj Leonardo sukcesis plie firmigi la konfidon de la junulo [...]
      Through loving, sympathetic words Leonardo managed to strengthen the youth’s trust [in him] further.

Galician

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Old Galician-Portuguese ama (mistress), from Hispanic Late Latin amma, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *amma- (mother).[1]

Noun

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ama f (plural amas)

  1. mistress
  2. wet nurse
  3. housekeeper
    • 1448, X. Ferro Couselo, editor, A vida e a fala dos devanceiros, Vigo: Galaxia, page 295:
      Iten, Johán Cortido, vesiño da çidade d'Ourense, et sua ama diseron, por lo dito juramento que feito avyan, que omes de Aluaro de Taboa[da] que lle lleuaron e tomaron do seu lugar de Casa Noua sete mantas e hun alfamare e tres sabaas de cama et hun pano de cabeça et quatro toucas et hun sodario et viinte e duas maranas de fiado delgado et seys bincos de prata et huas doas de viinte pares de doas et hun leitón, por que lle dauan dosentos mrs, et seys sacos et dous coitellos de mesa et çen mrs vellos en diñeiros, et tres capilejos et dous vntos, et dous legóos nouos et hun espeto et hua fouçe et hun caldeiro de cobre et hun manto vermello et hua sabaa, e que todo lle tomaran e que a apancaran e que a encheran de couçes
      Item, Xoán Cortido, citizen of the city of Ourense, and his housekeeper, told, under the oath they'd done, that men of Álvaro de Taboada took from them and took in their place of Casa Nova: seven blankets, a quilt, three bedsheets, a cloth for the head, and four shawls and a shroud and twenty two skeins of thin yarn and six silver earrings and twenty pairs of beads and a sucking piglet, for which they would give two hundred maravedis, and six bags and two table knives and a hundred old maravedis in coins, and three coifs and two lards, and two new hoes and a roasting skewer and a sickle and a copper cauldron and a red robe and a sheet, and that all this they took and that they beat her up and filled her with kicks

Etymology 2

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Verb

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ama

  1. inflection of amar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

References

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  • Ernesto González Seoane, María Álvarez de la Granja, Ana Isabel Boullón Agrelo (20062022) “ama”, in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval (in Galician), Santiago de Compostela: ILG
  • ama” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • ama” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006–2013.
  • ama” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • ama” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.
  1. ^ Joan Coromines, José A. Pascual (1983–1991) “ama”, in Diccionario crítico etimológico castellano e hispánico (in Spanish), Madrid: Gredos

Galoli

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax.

Noun

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ama

  1. father

Garo

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Etymology

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

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ama

  1. mother

Synonyms

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References

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  • Burling, R. (2003) The Language of the Modhupur Mandi (Garo) Vol. II: The Lexicon[7], Bangladesh: University of Michigan, page 375

Guaraní

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Noun

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ama

  1. rain

Etymology

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Cognate with Saxwe Gbe ama, Adja ama, Fon ama.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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amà (plural amà lẹ)

  1. leaf

Hawaiian

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Etymology

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From Proto-Polynesian *hama. Cognates include Tongan hama and Maori ama.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈa.ma/, [ˈɐ.mə]

Noun

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ama

  1. outrigger float

References

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  • Pukui, Mary Kawena, Elbert, Samuel H. (1986) “ama”, in Hawaiian Dictionary, Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press

Hoyahoya

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Noun

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ama

  1. man

References

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Hungarian

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Pronunciation

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Determiner

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ama

  1. (archaic, literary) Alternative form of amaz before consonants: that (as in yon or yonder)
    Coordinate term: eme

Usage notes

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See at eme.

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Further reading

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  • ama in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (‘The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’, abbr.: ÉrtSz.). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • ama, redirecting to amaz in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (‘A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress)

Icelandic

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Etymology

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From Old Norse ama.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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ama (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative amaði, supine amað)

  1. to trouble

Conjugation

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Derived terms

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Ilocano

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Noun

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ama

  1. father

Interlingua

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Pronunciation

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Verb

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ama

  1. present of amar
  2. imperative of amar

Irish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

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ama m (genitive singular ama, nominative plural amaí)

  1. yoke
  2. (in the plural) hames
Declension
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

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ama m

  1. genitive singular of am

Mutation

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Irish mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ama n-ama hama not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

References

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Italian

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈa.ma/
  • Rhymes: -ama
  • Hyphenation: à‧ma

Verb

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ama

  1. inflection of amare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Japanese

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Romanization

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ama

  1. Rōmaji transcription of あま

Jarai

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax.

Noun

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ama (classifier čô)

  1. father

Javanese

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Romanization

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ama

  1. Romanization of ꦲꦩ

Kamayurá

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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ama

  1. mother

References

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  • Meinke Salzer (1976) “Fonologia Provisória da Língua Kamayurá”, in Série Linguística, volume 5, pages 131–170

Kankanaey

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Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈʔama/, [ˈʔaː.mʌ]

Noun

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ama

  1. father

Laboya

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax.

Noun

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ama

  1. father

References

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  • Rina, A. Dj., Kabba, John Lado B. (2011) “ama”, in Kamus Bahasa Lamboya, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat [Dictionary of Lamboya Language, West Sumba Regency], Waikabubak: Dinas Kebudayaan dan Pariwisata, Kabupaten Sumba Bakat, page 5
  • Blust, Robert; Trussel, Stephen; et al. (2023) “*amax”, in the CLDF dataset from The Austronesian Comparative Dictionary (2010–), →DOI

Ladino

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Etymology

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From Turkish ama, from Ottoman Turkish اما (ammâ), from Arabic أَمَّا (ʔammā).

Conjunction

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ama

  1. but
    Synonyms: ma, pero

Latin

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Etymology 1

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See hama.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ama f (genitive amae); first declension

  1. Alternative spelling of hama
Declension
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First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative ama amae
Genitive amae amārum
Dative amae amīs
Accusative amam amās
Ablative amā amīs
Vocative ama amae

References

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Etymology 2

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A regularly conjugated form of amō (I love, verb).

Pronunciation

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Verb

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amā

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of amō

Conjunction

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ama

  1. Latin spelling of ამა (ama)

Limos Kalinga

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Noun

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amá

  1. father

Lolopo

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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ama

  1. (Yao'an) mother, mom

Lubuagan Kalinga

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Noun

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ama

  1. father

Maguindanao

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Noun

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ama

  1. father

Maltese

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Etymology

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From Italian amare.

Pronunciation

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Verb

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ama (imperfect jama, past participle amat, verbal noun amar)

  1. to love, like

Conjugation

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    Conjugation of ama
singular plural
1st person 2nd person 3rd person 1st person 2nd person 3rd person
perfect m amajt amajt ama amajna amajtu amaw
f amat
imperfect m nama tama jama namaw tamaw jamaw
f tama
imperative ama amaw
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Mansaka

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax.

Noun

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ama

  1. father

Maori

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Etymology

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From Proto-Polynesian *hama. Cognates include Tongan hama and Hawaiian ama.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ama

  1. outrigger (of a canoe)
  2. bargeboard support

References

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  • ama” in John C. Moorfield, Te Aka: Maori–English, English–Maori Dictionary and Index, 3rd edition, Longman/Pearson Education New Zealand, 2011, →ISBN.

Matal

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Conjunction

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ama

  1. but
    Dza uwana asal matəf gəl aŋha, adàziŋ ala, ama dza uwana az gəl aŋha ala kà gi, adàɓəl gəl aŋha. (Mata 16:25)[1]
    For whoever wants to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life on account of me will find it. (Matthew 16:25)

References

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Nias

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Noun

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ama (mutated form nama)

  1. father
    amagumy father
    amadaour (and also your) father[1]

References

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  1. ^ Brown, Lea (1997) "Nominal Mutation in Nias." In Odé, Cecilia & Wim Stokhof Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Austronesian Linguistics, p. 398. Amsterdam: Rodopi. →ISBN

Nyimang

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Noun

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ámá

  1. human beings, people
  2. members of the Nyimang people who speak the Ama dialect

References

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  • Afrikanistische Arbeitspapiere, issues 61-64, page 103: From the accompanying notes, I have these self-names: Nyimang ama-du wada 'ama (people)-of language' and [...]
  • Claude Rilly, Alex de Voogt, The Meroitic Language and Writing System (2012), page 80 (in notes)

Old Norse

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Etymology

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From Proto-Germanic *ammōną (to irritate, bother). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃emh₃- (to insist, urge).

Pronunciation

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  • Hyphenation: am‧a

Verb

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ama

  1. to bother
  2. to wound

Conjugation

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Noun

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ama f (genitive ǫmu, plural ǫmur)

  1. a large amount, a ton

References

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  • ama in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Ometepec Nahuatl

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Noun

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ama

  1. paper

Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Old Galician-Portuguese ama, from Late Latin amma, q.v.

Noun

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ama f (plural amas)

  1. female nurse
  2. female housekeeper
  3. governess
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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ama

  1. inflection of amar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Quechua

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Adverb

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ama

  1. (imperative) do not, used with -chu
    Ama mikhuychu!
    Don't eat!

Derived terms

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See also

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Noun

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ama

  1. old ruin

Declension

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Rade

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Etymology

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From Proto-Chamic *ʔama, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *t-ama, from Proto-Austronesian *t-ama.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ama

  1. a father

Rapa Nui

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Etymology

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From Proto-Polynesian *hama. Cognates include Tongan hama and Hawaiian ama.

Noun

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ama

  1. outrigger

Rukai

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *t-ama.

Noun

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ama

  1. father
  2. father's brother

Sakizaya

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *t-ama.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ama

  1. father

Scottish Gaelic

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Noun

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ama m

  1. genitive singular of àm

Mutation

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Scottish Gaelic mutation
Radical Eclipsis with h-prothesis with t-prothesis
ama n-ama h-ama t-ama
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Serbo-Croatian

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Etymology

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From Ottoman Turkish اما (ammâ), in turn from Arabic أَمَّا (ʔammā).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /âma/
  • Hyphenation: a‧ma

Conjunction

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ȁma (Cyrillic spelling а̏ма)

  1. (regional) but [from 18th c.]

Synonyms

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Interjection

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ama (Cyrillic spelling ама)

  1. (regional) Used to express impatience.; ugh, blah

Sicilian

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Verb

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ama

  1. inflection of amari:
    1. third-person singular present active indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Sidamo

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Etymology

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From Proto-Cushitic. Cognates include Burji ama and Hadiyya ama.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈama/
  • Hyphenation: a‧ma

Noun

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ama f (plural amuwa f)

  1. mother

Declension

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References

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  • Kazuhiro Kawachi (2007) A grammar of Sidaama (Sidamo), a Cushitic language of Ethiopia, page 82
  • Gizaw Shimelis, editor (2007), “ama”, in Sidaama-Amharic-English dictionary, Addis Ababa: Sidama Information and Culture department

Somali

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Conjunction

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ama

  1. or

Spanish

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Pronunciation

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Etymology 1

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From Late Latin amma, q.v.

Noun

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ama f (plural amas, masculine amo, masculine plural amos)

  1. lady of the house
  2. proprietress
  3. landlady
  4. housekeeper, head maid
  5. nursemaid, nanny
  6. wetnurse
  7. mistress
Usage notes
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  • Feminine nouns beginning with stressed /ˈa/ like this one regularly take the singular articles el and un, usually reserved for masculine nouns.
    el ama, un ama
  • They maintain the usual feminine singular articles la and una if an adjective intervenes between the article and the noun.
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

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ama

  1. inflection of amar:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

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Sumerian

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Romanization

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ama

  1. Romanization of 𒂼 (ama)

Swahili

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Etymology

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From Arabic أَم (ʔam).

Pronunciation

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Conjunction

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ama

  1. or
    Synonym: au

Tagalog

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Etymology 1

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax. Compare Bikol Central ama, Cebuano ama, Fijian tama, Higaonon amay, Hiligaynon amay, Ibanag yama, Maranao ama', Malay rama, Saaroa ama'a, Taivoan ama', and Yami ama.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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amá (Baybayin spelling ᜀᜋ)

  1. (formal, literary) father
    Synonyms: tatay, papa, itay, (idiomatic) haligi ng tahanan
  2. (figurative) founder; organizer
    Synonym: tagapagtatag
  3. senior; older
  4. sire
Derived terms
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Etymology 2

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Borrowed from Spanish ama.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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ama (Baybayin spelling ᜀᜋ)

  1. mistress; housewife
  2. governess; caretaker of children

Etymology 3

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From Chinese [Term?].

Pronunciation

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Adverb

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ama (Baybayin spelling ᜀᜋ)

  1. rarely; seldom
    Synonyms: bihira, madalang, manaka-naka

Etymology 4

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Borrowed from Hokkien 阿媽阿妈 (a-má, paternal grandmother).

Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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amá (Baybayin spelling ᜀᜋ) (Chinese Filipino, colloquial)

  1. paternal grandmother; paternal grandma
    Synonym: lola
    Coordinate term: angkong
    • 2006, Christine S. Bellen, “Trese”, in Carla M. Pacis, Eugene Y. Evasco, editors, Bagets: an anthology of Filipino young adult fiction[8], UP Press, page 11:
      Mestisang Tsina naman si Nanay. Negosyante sina Ama at Angkong ko. Purong Tsino si Angkong. Lumikas mula sa Macao ang pamilya nila at dito sa Pilipinas nagtayo ng isang maliit na tindahan hanggang sa lumago ito at naging isang grocery.
      Mom is a Chinese mestiza. My grandmother and grandfather are businesspeople. Grandpa is a pure Chinese. Their family evacuated from Macau and it was here in the Philippines where they started a small store until it flourished and became a grocery.
  2. term of address for one's paternal grandmother
    • 2006, Christine S. Bellen, “Trese”, in Carla M. Pacis, Eugene Y. Evasco, editors, Bagets: an anthology of Filipino young adult fiction[9], UP Press, page 11:
      Sa Pilipinas na napangasawa ni Angkong si Ama. Pilipina ang nanay ni Ama pero sila ang mas mahigpit sa mga pamahiing Tsino.
      It was in the Philippines already where Grandpa married Grandma. Grandma's mother is a Filipina but they are the ones who are stricter in Chinese superstitions.

Anagrams

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Tausug

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax.

Noun

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ama

  1. father

Thao

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Noun

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ama

  1. father
  2. paternal uncle

Torres Strait Creole

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Noun

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ama

  1. mother
  2. maternal aunt; one's mother's sister
  3. mother-in-law; one's spouse's mother

Turkish

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Etymology 1

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Inherited from Ottoman Turkish اما (ammâ), from Arabic أَمَّا (ʔammā).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈɑ.mɑ]
  • Hyphenation: a‧ma

Conjunction

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ama

  1. but; however
    Synonyms: ancak, amma, lakin, velakin
Descendants
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  • Ladino: ama

Etymology 2

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From am (cunt, pussy) +‎ -a (dative suffix).

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [äˈmä]
  • Hyphenation: a‧ma

Noun

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ama

  1. dative singular of am

See also

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Further reading

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Tzotzil

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Pronunciation

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  • (Zinacantán) IPA(key): /ˈʔämä/

Noun

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ama

  1. flute

References

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Noun

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ama

  1. water

References

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Wayuu

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Noun

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ama

  1. horse

Yale

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Noun

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ama

  1. dog

Yami

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Etymology

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From Proto-Austronesian *amax.

Noun

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ama

  1. father