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BalineseEdit

RomanizationEdit

pasar

  1. Romanization of ᬧᬲᬃ

CebuanoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish pasar (to pass).

NounEdit

pasar

  1. A passing grade; a pass mark, a passing mark, a passing score.

AdjectiveEdit

pasar

  1. passed
  2. qualified

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese passar, from Vulgar Latin *passāre, from Latin passum, supine of pando (I stretch, I spread out).

VerbEdit

pasar (first-person singular present paso, first-person singular preterite pasei, past participle pasado)

  1. to pass, cross
  2. first/third-person singular future subjunctive of pasar
  3. first/third-person singular personal infinitive of pasar

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Esperanto pasiEnglish passFrench passerGerman passierenItalian passareSpanish pasar, ultimately from Vulgar Latin *passāre.

VerbEdit

pasar (present pasas, past pasis, future pasos, conditional pasus, imperative pasez)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) to pass (through, above something)
  2. (transitive) to pass (one’s life, time, etc.)
  3. (intransitive) to pass away

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

  • pasajo (anything which is passed, gone)
  • pasanta (passing, transitory)
  • pasanto (passer-by, passenger)
  • pasema (passing, transitory)
  • pasero (passer-by, passenger)
  • paseyo (pass; passage)
  • pasigar (to cause to pass; to cause or allow to pass)
  • pasinta (past, gone)
  • pasinto (one who has passed; dead, vanished person)
  • paso (passing, passage)
  • paso-letro (pass: permit for transit)
  • paso-vorto (password)
  • pas-permiso (pass: permit for transit)
  • preterpasar (to pass by)
  • ripasar (to repass, pass by again)
  • superpasar (to rise above, surmount)
  • transpasar (to go by or beyond; to exceed)

See alsoEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Malay pasar, Borrowed from Persian بازار(bâzâr, market).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pasar (plural pasar-pasar, first-person possessive pasarku, second-person possessive pasarmu, third-person possessive pasarnya)

  1. market

Derived termsEdit


MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Persian بازار(bâzâr, market).

NounEdit

pasar

  1. market

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish, from Vulgar Latin *passāre, from Latin passum, supine of pando (I stretch, I spread out). Compare English pass, Italian passare, French passer, Portuguese passar.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

pasar (first-person singular present paso, first-person singular preterite pasé, past participle pasado)

  1. to pass
  2. (intransitive) to happen
    ¿qué pasa?
    what's up?
    estas cosas pasan
    these things happen
  3. (transitive) to pass (go past, by, over)
  4. (transitive) to spend time
    pasarlo bien
    to have a good time
    pásalo en grande
    have a great time
  5. (intransitive) to enter a room
  6. (reflexive) to go too far, exaggerate
  7. (reflexive) to exceed, surpass
  8. (reflexive) to ripen too much, become rotten, become off (food)
  9. (transitive) to pass (filter)
  10. (transitive) to strain, to sieve, to sift
    Synonyms: cerner, cribar, tamizar
  11. (transitive) to break the law, rule, order
  12. (transitive) to trespass (enter on someone's property without permission)
  13. to puree (crush or grind food into a puree)
  14. to omit, leave out
    ¡pasa de ellos!
    pay no attention to them!; just ignore them!; forget them! forget about them!
  15. (transitive) to send, transmit
    Synonyms: enviar, transmitir
  16. (transitive) to stand, tolerate, bear
    Synonyms: sufrir, tolerar, soportar
  17. to pass an exam
    Synonym: aprobar

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *passāre (compare Italian passare), from Latin passum, supine of pando (I stretch, I spread out).

VerbEdit

pasar

  1. (transitive) to journey
  2. (transitive) to filter
  3. (transitive) to pass, cross
  4. (transitive) to thread (through)

ConjugationEdit

  • Venetian conjugation varies from one region to another. Hence, the following conjugation should be considered as typical, not as exhaustive.

Related termsEdit