æ

(Redirected from 𐞃)

æ U+00E6, æ
LATIN SMALL LETTER AE
å
[U+00E5]
Latin-1 Supplement ç
[U+00E7]
𐞃 U+10783, 𐞃
MODIFIER LETTER SMALL AE
𐞂
[U+10782]
Latin Extended-F 𐞄
[U+10784]

Translingual edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Symbol edit

æ

  1. (IPA) a near-open front unrounded vowel.
    (superscript ⟨𐞃⟩) [æ]-coloring or a weak, fleeting, epenthetic or echo [æ].

See also edit

English edit

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /iː/, /ɛ/, or speaker's approximation of Latin ae.

Symbol edit

æ (lower case, upper case Æ, plural æs or æ's)

  1. (chiefly dated) The letter ash, a ligature of vowels a and e.
    Synonyms: ae, e

Usage notes edit

  • Mostly used for words of either Ancient Greek or Latin origin, though also used when referencing Old English texts or using recently derived Old English loanwords.
  • Often absent in American English (reduced to e) whenever it has the sound /ɛ/ or /iː/, but sometimes retained (in this form, or as ae) when it has a different sound, as in formulæ/formulae.

See also edit

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

æ (upper case Æ)

  1. Antepenultimate letter of the Danish alphabet.
Inflection edit
See also edit


References edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Old Danish thæn (Modern Danish den).

Article edit

æ

  1. (dialectal) the (definite article)

Further reading edit

Faroese edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

æ (upper case Æ)

  1. The twenty-eighth letter of the Faroese alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

French edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (letter name) IPA(key): /ø dɑ̃ l‿a/
  • (file)

Letter edit

æ (lower case, upper case Æ)

  1. Ligature of the letters a and e
    Synonym: e dans l’a

German edit

Symbol edit

æ (lower case, upper case Æ)

  1. Obsolete form of ä (used, alongside other graphemes, until ca. 1700, since then very rarely).

Icelandic edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

æ (upper case Æ)

  1. The thirty-first letter of the Icelandic alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit

Interjection edit

æ

  1. ah!, oh!
    Æ, já nú man ég!Ah, now I remember!
  2. indicating annoyance
    Æ, hvað heitir lagið aftur?Remind me again, what that song's called?
    Æææ, ég er kominn með bólu.Darn it, I have a zit.
  3. indicating compassion; alas
    Æ, það er leitt að heyra.That's sad to hear.
    Æ, því miður.Unfortunately not.
  4. indicating affection; aww!
    Æææ, en sætt!Aww, how cute!
  5. indicating pain; ouch!, ow!
    Synonyms: ái, áts, á
    Æ! Hann beit mig!Ouch! He bit me!

Usage notes edit

Can be arbitrarily lengthened and written as ææ, æææ and so on.

Adverb edit

æ

  1. always, forever

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Jutish edit

Etymology edit

From Old Norse ek.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

æ

  1. (Fjolde) I (first-person singular pronoun)

References edit

  • æ” in Anders Bjerrum and Marie Bjerrum (1974), Ordbog over Fjoldemålet, Copenhagen: Akademisk Forlag.

Kawésqar edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

æ (upper case Æ)

  1. A letter of the Kawésqar alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Ligurian edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

æ

  1. second-person singular present indicative of avéi: you have (singular)

Middle English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English ēa, ǣ.

Noun edit

æ

  1. a waterway; a stream or river.

Descendants edit

  • English: ea, Eau, eau, yeo

Norwegian edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

æ (upper case Æ)

  1. Antepenultimate letter of the Norwegian alphabet, coming after Z and before Ø.

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

Variant of eg, from Old Norse ek.

Pronunciation edit

Pronoun edit

æ (accusative )

  1. (dialectal, Trøndelag, Northern Norway, Southern Norway) I (first-person singular personal pronoun)

See also edit

Old English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

Letter edit

ǣ (upper case Æ)

  1. letter of the Old English (Anglo-Saxon) alphabet, listed in 24th and final position by Byrhtferð (1011); Called æsc (ash tree) after the Anglo-Saxon rune

Etymology 2 edit

From Proto-West Germanic *aiwi. Cognate with Old Frisian and Old High German ēwa ~ ē, Old Saxon ēo.

Alternative forms edit

Noun edit

ǣ f

  1. law
  2. marriage
  3. rite
Declension edit
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit

Etymology 3 edit

Noun edit

ǣ f

  1. Alternative form of ēa: river, running water

Old Norse edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Proto-Germanic *aiwi (forever), *aiwaz. Cognate with Old English ā, āwa, ǣ, Old Saxon eo, io, ia, Old High German eo, io.

Alternative forms edit

Adverb edit

æ (not comparable)

  1. ever, eternally, at any time
    • Vǫluspá, verse 19, lines 7-8, in 1867, S. Bugge, Norrœn fornkvæði: Sæmundar Edda hins fróða. Christiania, page 4:
      [] stendr æ yfir grœnn / Urðar brunni
      [] stands ever green, over / the well of Urd
Descendants edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

æ

  1. inflection of æja:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

Old Swedish edit

Pronunciation edit

Letter edit

æ

  1. a letter of the Old Swedish alphabet, written in the Latin script.

Verb edit

æ

  1. second-person present imperative of vara

Swedish edit

Letter edit

æ (upper case Æ)

  1. An archaic form of ä, a letter of the Swedish alphabet, written in the Latin script.

See also edit