See also: reposé

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English reposen (to be at rest), from Middle French reposer from Old French repauser from Late Latin repausō (to lay to rest, quiet; comfort, soothe; lie down, be at rest, rest), from re- (again, back) +‎ pausō (to halt, cease, pause, rest), from Latin pausa (pause, halt, stop, rest) from Koine Greek παῦσις (paûsis, stopping, ceasing; pause) from Ancient Greek παύω (paúō, to make to rest; cease, stop, hinder, halt).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

repose (countable and uncountable, plural reposes)

  1. (dated) Rest; sleep.
    • 1582 – 1610, Douay Rheims Bible, Book of Ecclesiasticus (Wisdom of Sirach) XL.1–11:
      Great trauail is created to al men, and an heauie yoke vpon the children of Adam, from the day of their comming forth of their mothers wombe, vntil the day of their burying, into the mother of al. Their cogitations, and feares of the hart, imagination of things to come, and the day of their ending: from him that ſitteth vpon the glorious ſeate, vnto him that is humbled in earth & aſhes. From him that weareth hyacinth, and beareth the crowne, euen to him that is couered with rude linen: furie, enuie, tumult, wauering, and the feare of death, anger perſeuering, and contention, and in time of repoſe in bed, the ſleepe of night changeth his knowledge. A litle is as nothing in reſt, and afterward in ſleepe, as in the day of watch. He is troubled in the viſion of his hart, as he that hath eſcaped in the day of battel. In the time of his ſafetie he roſe vp, and merueleth at no feare: with al fleſh, from man euen to beaſt, and vpon ſinners ſeuenfold. Beſides theſe things, death, bloud, contention, and ſword, oppreſſions, famine, and contrition, and ſcourges: for the wicked al theſe were created, and for them the floud was made. Al things that are of the earth, ſhal turne into the earth, and al waters ſhal returne into the ſea.
    • 1908, Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows
      Dark and deserted as it was, the night was full of small noises, song and chatter and rustling, telling of the busy little population who were up and about, plying their trades and vocations through the night till sunshine should fall on them at last and send them off to their well-earned repose.
    • 1945 August 17, George Orwell [pseudonym; Eric Arthur Blair], chapter 6, in Animal Farm: A Fairy Story, London: Secker & Warburg, OCLC 3655473:
      You would not rob us of our repose, would you, comrades? You would not have us too tired to carry out our duties?
  2. quietness; ease; peace; calmness.
  3. (geology) The period between eruptions of a volcano.
  4. (art) A form of visual harmony that gives rest to the eye.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

repose (third-person singular simple present reposes, present participle reposing, simple past and past participle reposed)

  1. (intransitive) To lie at rest; to rest.
  2. (intransitive) To lie; to be supported.
    trap reposing on sand
  3. (transitive) To lay, to set down.
  4. (transitive) To place, have, or rest; to set; to entrust.
  5. (transitive) To compose; to make tranquil.
  6. (intransitive) To reside in something.
  7. (intransitive, figurative) To remain or abide restfully without anxiety or alarms.
    • 1832, Isaac Taylor, Saturday Evening
      It is upon these that the soul may repose.
  8. (intransitive, Eastern Orthodox Church) To die, especially of a saint.
    Simon reposed in the year 1287.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

re- +‎ pose

VerbEdit

repose (third-person singular simple present reposes, present participle reposing, simple past and past participle reposed)

  1. (transitive) To pose again.

Further readingEdit


AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

repose

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of reposar

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

repose

  1. inflection of reposer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

repose

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of reposar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of reposar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of reposar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of reposar.