Open main menu

AfrikaansEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch jou. Also related to English you.

PronounEdit

jou (subject jy)

  1. you (singular, object)

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch jouw.

DeterminerEdit

jou

  1. your (singular)
    • 2016, “In Jou Atmosfeer”, in Sal Jy Met My Dans?[1], South Africa, performed by Kurt Darren:
      In jou atmosfeer.
      In your atmosphere.

See alsoEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan (compare Occitan jo), from Latin jugum, iugum (compare French joug, Italian giogo), from Proto-Italic *jugom, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

jou m (plural jous)

  1. yoke

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch jou, from Old Dutch *jū, a northern (Frisian?) variant of *iu, from Proto-Germanic *iwwiz, a West Germanic variant of *izwiz. Doublet of u.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

jou

  1. objective form of jij (you (singular)): you
    Ik zal dit wel even doen voor jou.I'll do this for you.

InflectionEdit


Alternative formsEdit

  • a (Brabantian)

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Afrikaans: jou

VerbEdit

jou

  1. first-person singular present indicative of jouen
  2. imperative of jouen

FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

< English yo

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈjou̯/, [ˈjo̞u̯]

InterjectionEdit

jou

  1. (slang) yo (greeting)

AnagramsEdit


Haitian CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French jour.

NounEdit

jou

  1. day

Kalo Finnish RomaniEdit

PronounEdit

jou

  1. he

ReferencesEdit

  • jou” in Finnish Romani-English Dictionary, ROMLEX – the Romani Lexicon Project, 2000.

Old FrenchEdit

PronounEdit

jou

  1. # Alternative form of je

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun) jau
  • (Sursilvan) jeu
  • (Surmiran) ia
  • (Puter) eau
  • (Vallader) eu

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *eo, from Latin ego, from Proto-Indo-European *éǵh₂.

PronounEdit

jou

  1. (Sutsilvan) I

TernateEdit

NounEdit

jou

  1. lord

ReferencesEdit

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001). A Descriptive Study of the Language of Ternate, the Northern Moluccas, Indonesia. University of Pittsburgh.

West FrisianEdit